Posts Tagged ‘health technology’

Infographic: The Connected Health Opportunity

February 12th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

While a recent Scripps Institute study found that connected healthcare devices had no discernible impact on healthcare utilization, and little impact on health self-management, there are several healthcare organizations reporting costs savings and improved clinical outcomes from such programs, highlighted in a new infographic by Chilmark Research.

The infographic examines five case studies of healthcare organizations using technology and the impact the programs have had on costs and utilization.

The Connected Health Opportunity

Real-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels.

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Infographic: Caregivers Key to Patient Engagement

January 8th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

While non-professional caregivers realize technology for seniors can enrich the lives of older adults in their care, many of these caregivers are the unintentional barriers to the actual technology’s adoption, according to a new infographic by Philips.

The infographic looks at how caregivers help improve the lives of older adults in their care, how caregivers and older adults are using technology and the potential benefits of technology in the care of older adults.

From home sensors that track daily motion and sleep abnormalities to video visits via teleconferencing, Humana’s nine pilots of remote patient monitoring test technologies to keep the frail elderly at home as long as possible. When integrated with telephonic care management, remote monitoring has helped to avert medical emergencies and preventable hospitalizations among individuals with serious medical and functional challenges.

In Remote Patient Monitoring for Enhanced Care Coordination: Technology to Manage an Aging Population, Gail Miller, vice president of telephonic clinical operations in Humana’s care management organization, Humana Cares/SeniorBridge, reviews Humana’s expanded continuum of care aimed at improving health outcomes, increasing satisfaction and reducing overall healthcare costs with a more holistic approach.

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Infographic: Technology Use, Prices Drive High U.S. Healthcare Costs

December 7th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

The United States spent more per person on healthcare than 12 other high-income nations in 2013, while seeing the lowest life expectancy and some of the worst health outcomes among this group, according to a Commonwealth Fund report. The analysis shows that in the United States, which spent an average of $9,086 per person annually, life expectancy was 78.8 years. Switzerland, the second-highest-spending country, spent $6,325 per person and had a life expectancy of 82.9 years. Mortality rates for cancer were among the lowest in the United States, but rates of chronic conditions, obesity, and infant mortality were higher than those abroad.

U.S. healthcare spending per person is highest not because Americans go to doctors and hospitals more often, but because of greater medical technology use and healthcare prices that are higher than in other nations, according to the report. Some of the reports findings are depicted in a new infographic by The Commonwealth Fund, including a comparison of: bypass surgery costs in the United States and the Netherlands; MRI exams per 1,000 people in the United States and Canada; and annual physician visits in the United States and in 34 high-income countries.

From cost pressures, consumerism and consolidation to a proliferation of patient-centered, value-based delivery and payment models, the state of healthcare continues to challenge organizations in the industry.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2016: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN’s 12th annual business forecast, pins down the trends destined to impact the industry in the year to come and proposes tactics C-suite executives can employ to distinguish their operations in a dynamic marketplace.

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Infographic: Leveraging Healthcare Technology

August 26th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Leveraging Healthcare TechnologyTechnology has the potential to transform the healthcare delivery system by improving communication, streamlining workflows, simplifying information-sharing and allowing patients to engage in their healthcare, according to an infographic by XIFIN.

The infographic looks at how to optimize economics in the healthcare system and the potential impact of this optimization.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based SystemEncouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

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Infographic: The Connected Patient

April 17th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

The healthcare industry is still lagging behind patient expectations in terms of technology use and accessibility, according to a new report by Salesforce.com

The report found millennials prefer to engage with their providers through modern technology, and this will pressure healthcare providers to embed more social, mobile, and cloud technologies in their day-to-day interactions with patients. An infographic by Salesforce.com examines how patients currently connect with providers and what the future of health will look like.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

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Infographic: HealthTech Trends

March 25th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Data, connectivity and innovation are changing the healthcare landscape, according to a new infographic by Philips.

In the infographic, Philips examines the potential of wearable technologies, connected devices, electronic health records, telehealth, predictive analytics, population health management, mobile health apps, data security, partnerships and cloud-based technology in healthcare.

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care ManagementReal-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels.

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11 Statistics About Remote Patient Monitoring

December 23rd, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

Remote monitoring of individuals with multiple chronic conditions reduced hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted disease self-management for nearly all of these monitored patients, according to the 119 respondents who participated in the Healthcare Intelligence Network’s inaugural survey on Remote Patient Monitoring in March 2014. Other targets of a remote monitoring strategy included frequent utilizers of hospitals and emergency rooms (ERs) (62 percent) and the recently discharged (52 percent).

Following are seven more statistics from the Remote Patient Monitoring survey:

  • Fifty percent of respondents rely on specific diagnoses sets to identify candidates for remote monitoring.
  • More than a quarter of respondents (27 percent) target the frail and/or home-bound with remote monitoring programs.
  • Reimbursement for remote monitoring, followed by the education of patients in this technology, were identified by respondents as the chief challenges of these remote care management efforts.
  • Two-thirds of respondents said remote monitoring reduced bed days.
  • Telephonic case management is a component of remote monitoring efforts for 71 percent of 2014 respondents.
  • About a third of respondents report the use of either a Web interface or a dedicated mHealth app to supplement remote monitoring.
  • A patient-centered touch, such as a follow-up phone reminder to use a monitoring device or a personal coaching session, was frequently cited as a noteworthy supplement to remote monitoring technology.

Source: 2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/2014-Healthcare-Benchmarks-Remote-Patient-Monitoring_p_4868.html

2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring delivers a comprehensive set of metrics from more than 100 healthcare organizations on current practices in and ramifications of remote monitoring for care management of chronic illness, the frail elderly and remote populations.

Infographic: Healthcare Information Technology Trends for 2014

January 20th, 2014 by Jackie Lyons

Patients aren’t the only ones utilizing emerging technology for healthcare purposes. Seventy percent of physicians use their smartphones to research medications at least once a week, according to a new infographic from CDW Healthcare.

This infographic presents healthcare information technology (HIT) trends that will impact healthcare in 2014. These trends include cloud computing, mobile electronic health record apps, remote monitoring, telehealth and more.

Healthcare Information Technology Trends for 2014

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You may also be interested in this related resource: Healthcare Innovation in Action: 19 Transformative Trends.

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Infographic: Doctors Go Digital, State By State

September 12th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

Implementing electronic health records (EHRs) can transform care delivery and reduce potential errors that lead to adverse events.

More than half of all physicians are now using EHRs, but the numbers vary widely by state, according to a new infographic presented by Xerox. This infographic shows nationwide averages for EHRs by state, as well as the use of e-prescribing, by physicians.

Doctors Go Digital, State By State

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You may also be interested in this related resource: Electronic Health Records: Strategies for Long-Term Success.

Q&A: Predicting 2013 Healthcare Trends

January 29th, 2013 by Jessica Fornarotto

“There will be a significant investment in EHRs in 2013,” predicts Dennis Eder, managing director of Strategic Health Group. Eder also expects there will be more physician-run ACOs in 2013 compared to 2012.

Prior to their presentations during an October webinar on Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2013: A Strategic Planning Session, Eder, along with Hank Osowski, managing director of Strategic Health Group, and Steven Valentine, president of The Camden Group, shared the changes they see coming in 2013 for the healthcare industry, including future payment models, ACO administration, and demands for services.

HIN: Physician payment models are getting a lot of retooling — from the addition of pay for performance incentives for hitting quality metrics to care coordination payments for patients and members in medical homes. Is this going to change much in 2013? Are we going to see a shift toward shared savings or another payment model in the coming year?

(Hank Osowksi): Watching the trends over the last year or two and many of the innovations that are being tried, the industry is moving toward value-based purchasing and population risk-based purchasing. We think this is going to accelerate as we look at 2013, 2014 and beyond.

(Dennis Eder): I would agree with Hank. We believe with the events of 2012 and the significant interest in ACO participation, it will mature and continue into the future.

HIN: In comparing some results from our 2011 and 2012 surveys on accountable care organizations, we noticed a sizeable shift in ACO administration from hospital-run to physician-administered. Why do you think so many hospitals backed away from this role when the ACO model seemed so promising?

(Dennis Eder): One of the reasons we think this may be occurring is that hospitals administering ACOs is not part of their core competency. Many of the characteristics of an ACO are a health plan or a management service organization (MSO). And this is not what hospitals do, for the most part. In addition, hospital margins are thin, and have even become thinner, so any overhead that they can offload is a good thing. Physician organizations do this and they’re the ones who are responsible for the medical management and other care management in an ACO. I think it makes logical sense to have the physician organization take on more of an administrative role for an ACO.

(Hank Osowski): I think the point Dennis made is critically important. It is the physician organization that is controlling the array of services that the beneficiary is receiving. It makes sense for them to take a lead in running an ACO. They are the ones who best understand how all the pieces fit together and where the opportunities are to get efficiencies to improve quality and reduce the costs of care.

HIN: The IOM has recommended better and shared use of health data, particularly at the point of care, where key health decisions are made. What will be the technology to invest in or embrace in 2013 to improve data analytics for population health management?

(Dennis Eder): We’re going to continue to see a significant investment in EHRs. We know that it’s an important tool in some health plans. Kaiser, for example, is gaining significant market share. We see further investments in that particular area.

(Hank Osowski): It’s also important to take a self-examination of us as an industry. We have mountains of data. We have very little intelligence about where the value is in our system. Where can we leverage the most efficient of the care providers and change some of the things that are inefficient, that don’t contribute to high quality care and that drive up the costs? It’s digging into that mountain of data and pulling out the real healthcare intelligence that we as a system, and as an industry, can use to provide better care to patients.

HIN: What’s ahead for population health management?

(Steven Valentine): We will begin to see more fierce competition, if you will, around population health management. People are going to try to concur and grab more populations to work with in their delivery systems. We’re expecting that we should have slightly soft demands for services. We would find that even with the population getting older, and with these new delivery systems and lower utilization rates, we don’t expect to see an uptick in volume — stable to a slight decline — which means you have to reduce your expenses and go after an additional market share population.