Posts Tagged ‘wellness’

Infographic: The Journey to Population Wellness

May 21st, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Population health has become a puzzle of processes and technologies to improve health outcomes, enhance the physician-patient experience, and reduce costs. The healthcare industry must work together to chart a path toward interoperability, analytics and care tools that will impact the future of population health and wellness, according to a new infographic by Transcend Insights.

The infographic helps convey this journey in alignment with key findings from a Healthcare Financial Management Association executive survey on population health.

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-LifeWhen acknowledging its position as a top-ranking Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), Memorial Hermann is quick to credit its own physicians—who in 2007 lobbied for a clinically integrated network that formed the foundation of the current Memorial Hermann accountable care organization (ACO). Now, collaboration and integration continue to be the engines driving the ACO’s cost savings, reduced utilization and healthy patient engagement rates associated with Memorial Hermann ACO’s highest-risk population.

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-Life details Memorial Hermann’s carefully executed journey to quality and the culmination of the ACO’s community-based care management program.

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Infographic: How to Make Fitness Resolutions that Stick in the New Year

December 30th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

The failure rate for New Year’s resolutions is truly shocking. Every year some 64 percent of people will resolve to change for the better. Eating healthy food, losing excess pounds or getting fit are the most common goals, according to a new infographic by Fitness Review.

The infographic examines the key factors which can increase the success rate of these goals.

Infographic: How to Make Fitness Resolutions that Stick in the New Year

Increasing demand for quality-based, pay-for-value healthcare has elevated the health coach’s contribution to chronic care management and population health. From supporting ‘rising risk’ populations telephonically to conducting home visits for recently discharged high-risk, high-cost individuals, health coaching offers an essential care management touch point.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Health Coaching is the fifth comprehensive analysis of the health coaching arena by the Healthcare Intelligence Network, capturing key metrics such as populations, health conditions and health risk levels targeted by health coaching programs; risk stratification criteria; prevalence of embedded coaching within care sites; coaching tools and incentives as well as program outcomes and ROI from more than 100 healthcare organizations.

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Infographic: Achieving Wellness Goals

September 2nd, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Choosing the right tools and components for employer-sponsored wellness programs can make the difference in terms of generating healthy behavior change in employees, according to a new infographic by CompPsych.

The infographic examines what motivates employees to achieve wellness goals and compares results from health trackers versus coaches.

Increasing demand for quality-based, pay-for-value healthcare has elevated the health coach’s contribution to chronic care management and population health. From supporting ‘rising risk’ populations telephonically to conducting home visits for recently discharged high-risk, high-cost individuals, health coaching offers an essential care management touch point.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Health Coaching is the fifth comprehensive analysis of the health coaching arena by the Healthcare Intelligence Network, capturing key metrics such as populations, health conditions and health risk levels targeted by health coaching programs; risk stratification criteria; prevalence of embedded coaching within care sites; coaching tools and incentives as well as program outcomes and ROI from more than 100 healthcare organizations.

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Infographic: Shattering the Sick-Care Marketplace

May 11th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

The emergence of an entirely new healthcare business design that ignores the boundaries and economic framework of the existing healthcare system is occurring in response to healthcare consumerism trends and is resulting in new consumer health, wellness, and better-living products and services.

A new infographic by Oliver Wyman describes the circumstances driving this transformation, the expected market of these products and services and essential product and service elements.

Population Health Framework: 27 Strategies to Drive Engagement, Access & Risk StratificationFaith-based integrated delivery system Adventist Health is on a mission to improve population health status with a wellness-based approach it estimates will eventually net $49 million in savings.

Population Health Framework: 27 Strategies to Drive Engagement, Access & Risk Stratification walks through the elements of Adventist’s population health management program that engages individuals to modify behaviors and prevent illness in the future.

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Infographic: The Value of an Investment in Health Management

May 13th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Reduced employee health risk, followed by reduced healthcare costs and improved employee productivity are among the top reasons employer invest in health and wellness programs, according to a study by Optum and the National Business Group on Health, depicted in a new infographic.

The infographic also examines eight other emerging reasons for a health management investment by employers.

Profiting from Population Health Management: Applying Analytics in Accountable CareAs ACA reforms continue to impact healthcare, population health management (PHM) is fast becoming the new buzzword for the management, integration and measurement of all interventions across the health continuum, from the healthiest populations to those with catastrophic illnesses. Rooted in the IHI’s Triple Aim, PHM dives deep into health analytics to reduce risk and associated health spend and provide a strong foundation for accountable care in a value-based system.

Profiting from Population Health Management: Applying Analytics in Accountable Care provides both a primer in PHM, identifying the challenges and opportunities of a robust population health management program, and an advanced case study in the use of analytics in PHM.

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Guest Post: Building the Right Health Management Program

February 10th, 2015 by Ann Wyatt, Regional Vice President, HealthFitness

 Ann Wyatt

Ann Wyatt, Regional Vice President, HealthFitness

While Sibson’s Healthy Enterprise Study found that 40 percent of all health management programs are not effective, research shows that organizations adopting the most effective programs—those in the top 25 percent– experienced 16 percent lower healthcare costs and a 35 percent lower rate of increase in costs than the rest.1,2

Well-designed programs lead to improved retention, better employee morale and increased productivity. Reams of data support that.3,4,5

It would seem the answer is simply to build a good program. However, it’s not that simple; what works varies by workplace, income, age and a host of other factors. The task is to develop the right program for your target group. Research6 published in September found comprehensive workplace programs do work, but their success depends on program goals, design and implementation. The program must fit into the organization’s culture.

For instance, a focus group conducted for a client of HealthFitness – a large manufacturing plant population, found that some of wellness program names sounded too “feminine” to attract the rural, blue-collar, mostly male workers. Messages about the importance of good health weren’t effective, but “Get fit for hunting season” was.

Another example: A technology company with employees making six figures launched a health management program. The incentive to complete a health assessment and attend a biometric screening? A $25 gift card. The participation rates were dismal.

Employees want meaningful and relevant programs.7,8

It needn’t be costly, and success isn’t reserved for the mega-firms. Kramer Beverage, a small company in New Jersey, earned American Heart Association recognition for its efforts to keep employees healthy. The company provides gym membership discounts, offers healthful food options at meetings and in vending machines, and has created a walking track outside the building.

Another small company with a limited budget wanted to test the wellness program waters but was concerned it didn’t have the funds to make a big splash. The company started by putting a bowl of fruit in every break room once per week. The buzz it created revealed that employees were hungry for health.

It comes down to finding out what employees are “hungry” for and “feeding” them the means to reach their goals. That can vary widely, from shaving 10 seconds off a 5K time to being readier to hunt. You don’t have to build the perfect health management program–just the right one.

1Healthy Enterprise Study, Sibson Consulting, (Winter 2011)

2Steven F. Cyboran and Sadhna Paralkar, MD. “Wellness Program ROI Depends on Design and Implementation” Society for Human Resource Management, July 26, 2013

3Parks, K., et al. “Organizational Wellness Programs: A Meta-Analysis.” Journal of Occupational Health Psychology, 2008

4Goetzel RZ, et al. “Do workplace health promotion (wellness) programs work?” J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sep;56(9):927-34

52013 Aflac WorkForces Report conducted by Research Now

6J Occup Environ Med. 2014 Sept. op. cit.

7Aon Consumer Health Mindset,

8“Five voluntary trends to watch in 2014.” BenefitsPro , Dec. 13, 2013

Guest Post: Living Better, Not Just Longer: Worksite Wellness at Any Age

October 27th, 2014 by Tanja Madsen

Population health management

Living healthier, more productive years is the goal of population health management.

Just 20 years ago, about one in 10 workers was over the age of 55; today, it’s one in five. We are aging as a nation. We are living longer than our forebears a century ago, but can effective population health management push back the serious effects from chronic disease so we can live healthier, more productive years?

In the typical lifespan, there is a point at which an individual first becomes chronically ill or disabled, and a further point at which a person dies. On average, the time between those two points is about 20 years, according to healthy aging pioneer James Fries. Fries envisions a world in which we may not add many more years to the end of life, but we can “compress morbidity,” or shorten the number of years we suffer from illness.

The key question is: how can we maximize the healthy years of our lives? It’s not just a question important to individuals; it’s critically important to our economy as well. Population health and a nation’s financial health are inextricably linked. This is the focus of the World Economic Forum’s Healthy Living initiative, which found that more than 60 percent of global deaths are due to diseases associated with preventable lifestyle risk: cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, cancer and chronic respiratory diseases.

Closer to home, CEOs of some of the nation’s largest companies unveiled a new initiative, Building Better Health: Innovative Strategies from America’s Business Leaders, to leverage their market power to identify an evidence-based approach to population health.

As our working-age population grows older, it’s critical that employers seize the opportunity to address the factors that influence health and can enhance productivity in older workers. For those of us who work in health promotion and prevention, that starts with a change in how we define the concept of “health.” Taking a cue from public health research, we must recognize that health is more than the absence of disease and take a whole-person approach to total well-being. Public health literature points to physical, social, economic, environmental and genetic “determinants of health” that combine to affect the health of individuals and populations. Using a more expansive term for this view of health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention notes that well-being includes, at a minimum, positive emotions, satisfaction with life, fulfillment and positive [physical] functioning.

This fuller definition of well-being comes into play as employers focus on the value of this aging workforce. Older workers offer tangible benefits for employers to keep them healthy and productive. Researchers found that older workers (over age 65) make fewer serious errors than their younger colleagues (age 20 – 31); they also offer experience, consistently high motivation, a balanced daily routine and stable mood.

The University of Louisville’s program, “Get Healthy Now,” opens health coaching to all interested employees, regardless of whether they are at low-, medium- or high-risk for chronic disease. Care-giving workshops are designed to help everyone from new parents to sandwich-generation Baby Boomers caring for elderly parents; elements include legal, financial and social factors. Mindfulness, yoga and relaxation are among the many classes offered to promote well-being. ROI analysis found the UofL program returned a benefit cost ratio of 7.16 to 1 after four years, and it has become a model for a statewide strategic wellness initiative called “Get Healthy Kentucky.”

Evidence-based workplace health management programs that offer tools to support healthy aging can help older workers maintain active, productive lives. Some interventions, such as in-person health coaching, are particularly effective for those over age 40. In addition to a continued focus on the key behaviors that can help delay the onset of health problems (avoid tobacco, exercise regularly, and maintain a healthy weight), it becomes more important than ever to invest in programs that enhance the emotional, physical, social and financial well-being of all workers—no matter their age.

Tanja Madsen

Tanja Madsen

About the Author: A veteran of health education and health management product development, Tanja Madsen is director of product management for HealthFitness. She is involved in the development of the innovative HealthFitness technology platform, the Persona™ behavior change model, a short, engaging health assessment and a new approach to coaching. A certified health educator, Tanja works with a team that includes registered dietitians, health educators, exercise physiologists and behavior-change experts who are responsible for the development and management of national programs to improve population health.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

5 Ideas to Improve ACO Performance Results

June 19th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

One step John C. Lincoln network took to improve performance results at the end of its first year as a Medicare Shared Savings Program accountable care organization (MSSP ACO) was to focus on a relatively small number of patients, the top 5 percent of beneficiaries by claims volume who actually account for about 60 percent of medical spend, explains Heather Jelonek, CEO for ACOs at John C. Lincoln Network, who shares additional strategies here.

First, we decided to institute wellness visits across our health system. We’ve worked with several large third party payors here in the valley where they’re now recognizing the Medicare G-codes for wellness visits. We bring those patients in and get a full survey of what’s been going on with them.

Second, we’re engaging in regular population management. We now have our physicians talking about how often they want to see their patients with diabetes or hypertension or cancer.

Third, we’re also starting to focus on those individuals who are ‘aging in;’ those patients who are about 62½. We’re trying to get them in and get them into a routine, making sure they’ve got A1C scores every quarter and every six months, and have had their flu shots and colonoscopies. We’re hoping a healthier generation of individuals coming into the Medicare program improves the quality outcomes that we’ll see long-term.

Fourth, we’ve developed a standardization for our quality reporting. We’ve looked at the top 5 percent of our beneficiaries by claims volume, who actually account for about 60 percent of our medical spend. We’re hoping that by focusing on a relatively small number of patients, we’ll have a drastic impact on outcomes.

Next, we’re also leveraging our electronic medical record (EMR) to the fullest extent; we’re participating in a number of conversations and baseline studies with EPIC®. They are very interested in seeing what we’ve done with the tool and how we’re making it usable for our ACO reporting.

But the one thing that we will continue to struggle with and continue to dive deeply into is integration opportunities: talking to other communities, looking at health information exchanges (HIE’s) as we’re acquiring a new practice or signing a new community physician onto our ACO — bringing everybody to the table so that we’re all speaking the same language.

Excerpted from Beyond the EMR: Mining Population Health Analytics to Elevate Accountable Care.

3 2014 Trends for Health Plans

January 21st, 2014 by Jessica Fornarotto

Influencing primary care, aggregating and mining data, and embracing bundled or episode-based payments are three trends that will influence health plans in 2014, predicts Catherine Sreckovich, managing director in the healthcare practice at Navigant Consulting.

HIN interviewed Sreckovich on these trends prior to her presentation during HIN’s tenth annual webinar on Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2014: A Strategic Planning Session.

HIN: Where will data analytics take health plans in the coming year, and how will this shape population health management offerings?

(Catherine Sreckovich): We’re certainly hearing a lot about big data, and it will be an integral approach to merging this practice’s or population’s health, the ability to aggregate and mine data is going to be an essential capability for health plans for their predictive models. And the outputs of these models are going to enable the health plans to identify and stratify their members or population health. Member and patient demographics can also inform consumer engagement strategies to support population health. And the analytics are going to inform the effectiveness of different care management interventions and consumer engagement strategies.

HIN: Health plan case managers embedded alongside providers has become almost a de facto model. How will payors influence primary care delivery in the year to come?

(Catherine Sreckovich): There is a number of approaches evolving right now and that will continue to evolve as payors attempt to influence primary care delivery. One is the use of patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) and other integrated models to expand the payor’s role as the primary care case manager.

In addition to paying primary care providers to hire case managers and care coordinators, payors are pushing for shared savings arrangements with these primary care providers, such as within an accountable care organization (ACO), and to push them to manage the care for those with chronic conditions.

We’re also seeing payors paying for primary care physicians to become certified PCMHs and to implement electronic health records (EHRs), either by paying directly for the certification of the technology or by adding bonus payments to their FFS rates.

Payors are also paying for incentives for primary care physicians to offer wellness programs such as smoking cessation or weight loss programs and are trying very hard to influence where and to whom primary care physicians refer their patients by giving them information about the cost and quality of other provider types, such as specialists and hospitals.

And we will continue to see that payors will target the larger primary care physician practices with whom they have a critical mass of members to achieve enough savings to offset the added costs of incentives, bonuses and shared savings arrangements. As a result, we expect that some of the smaller primary care practices will likely not receive the same level of support and push from payors.

In another example, we see payors increasingly partnering with non-traditional providers, such as retail-based clinics and community health centers to offer easily accessible primary care at lower costs. And this will certainly be an opportunity to address some of the physician supply shortages that we anticipate seeing in the next year or so as more and more people have access to healthcare insurance and coverage.

Finally, another approach payors are using is to offer members access to virtual doctor visits via webcam, for example, and other telemedicine approaches that are giving individuals access to these primary care providers to increase access to convenient and low cost primary care for their patients.

HIN: CMS and top-performing Pioneer ACOs are heavily invested in bundled or episode-based payments. Will more private payors embrace this reimbursement method as well?

(Catherine Sreckovich): Definitely. The bundled or episodic-based payment approaches are here to stay. We’re starting to see this take off in a number of states. For example, there are state innovation grants that CMS has provided to states like Arkansas, Ohio, Delaware and others looking for opportunities to implement multi-payor bundled payment initiatives. Although these are not necessarily the traditional ACO model, they built off of that ACO model.

We also see that the large health plans in various states are starting to build and develop ACOs. Key to these are the shared savings arrangements that they’re implementing with these payment approaches. So whether they’re bundled or episodic-based payments or whether they look more like a traditional ACO, if there is such a thing, we’re starting to see takeoffs on those kinds of models as payors and health plans become more creative in the development of their alternatives.

Excerpted from: Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2014: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry

HINfographic: 7 Patient-Centered Strategies to Generate Value-Based Reimbursement

December 23rd, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

With time and resources at a premium, healthcare organizations are increasingly selective about allocation of human and financial capital. There are, however, a select group of initiatives and strategies worthy of C-suite investment.

Population health management, care coordination and integrated care delivery are among the top patient-centered healthcare strategies in 2014, according to a new infographic from the Healthcare Intelligence Network. This HINfographic also identifies the other top strategies, as well as metrics from existing programs.

7 Patient-Centered Strategies to Generate Value-Based Reimbursement

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Information presented in this infographic was excerpted from: 7 Patient-Centered Strategies to Generate Value-Based Reimbursement. If you would like to learn more about patient-centered strategies for value-based reimbursement, this resource includes even more information, including hospital-SNF care transitions, closing dual eligible care gaps, and lessons learned and results from some of the most recognizable names in healthcare — Kaiser Permanente, Mayo Clinic Health System, Monarch HealthCare, HealthFitness, and WellCare.

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