Posts Tagged ‘value partnerships’

Infographic: Payer-Provider Partnerships Continue to Deepen

December 11th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Payer-provider partnerships continue to deepen, with 68 percent of partnerships launched in 2017 being joint venture or fully co-branded insurance products, according to a new infographic by Oliver Wyman.

The infographic tracks the growth of partnerships since 2013 and how these partnerships support value-based healthcare models.

2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Community Health PartnershipsIncreasingly, healthcare organizations are forging community partnerships to bridge care gaps and improve population health status. This alignment of care and resources ranges from providing transportation to doctors’ appointments to scheduling EMT visits to visit the homebound elderly following their hospitalization. Working in tandem with community groups addresses social determinants of health (SDOH) and produces clinical and financial benefits that are recognized and rewarded by today’s value-based healthcare reimbursement models.

2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Community Health Partnerships documents the efforts of 81 healthcare organizations to align clinical interventions with neighborhood collaborations to improve health, wellness and socioeconomic factors in the populations they serve. These metrics are compiled from responses to the October 2017 Community Health Partnerships survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Click here for more information.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

BCBS Michigan PGIP Value Partnership Translates to Quality Improvement, Cost Savings

May 6th, 2014 by Patricia Donovan

Donna Saxton: BCBSM's PGIP has resulted in primary care-specialist collaborations that improved care coordination and reduced unnecessary utilization and spend.

Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan’s Physician Group Incentive Program (PGIP) is so studded with acronyms it’s almost a separate language, jokes Donna Saxton, BCBSM’s field team manager of BCBSM’s value partnerships program.

And while not everyone speaks PGIP-tian, it’s easy to translate the savings and benefits the medical home reward and incentives program portends for the insurer, its PCMH practices and its health plan members.

Ms. Saxton described PGIP’s place in BCBSM’s Value Partnerships program during Generating Medical Home Savings and Quality Improvements Through Outcome-Based Measures, including the structure of rewards and incentives that have produced results for the plan, which operates the largest network in Michigan.

“PGIP incentivizes providers to enhance the delivery of care by encouraging them to be responsible and proactive in their behaviors, and ultimately driving better health outcomes and also increasing the fee for value that we also desperately need to get to,” said Ms. Saxton.

In return, BCBSM provides financing tools and support for the nearly 18,500 primary care physicians and specialists who participate—more than half of BCBSM’s physician population.

Aimed at some root causes of high cost healthcare, including a weak primary care foundation, PGIP, which Ms. Saxton described as the organization’s “pinnacle” initiative, expects physician organizations (POs) to take responsibility for developing systems of care, motivating its physicians from within and adopting a culture of process improvement. In return, BCBSM places resources and a PGIP field team representative at the POs’ disposal.

Some PGIP activities eligible for incentives range from e-prescribing and patient registries to specialist referrals and medical homes‘ linkage to community services, Ms. Saxton explained. Further, BCBSM has amped up three key medical home initiatives for its organized systems of care (OSC), “putting them on steroids,” as Ms. Saxton said, to raise the performance bar and offer more chances for POs to earn incentives.

BCBSM coined the term OSC, which, while conceptually aligned with the goals of an accountable care organization (ACO) is designed to give providers more latitude in detemining their priorities, she noted. “The OSC is where the neighborhood concept comes into play, where you focus on implementation of PCMH neighborhood capabilities in your specialty offices to further address fragmented care.” BCBSM specialists are eligible for one-time incentives plus enhanced fees for collaboration with primary care practices.

A counterpart to PGIP incentives is the PGIP PCMH designation program, an opportunity for practices to earn BCBSM’s internally developed medical home designation and the added incentives that go with that distinction, such as increased reimbursement for PCMH office visits. The designation comprises 140 capabiities across a dozen areas.

To date, the biggest challenge of PGIP appears to be its extended access initiative, but practices who adopt more open scheduling often have much lower rates of ED and radiology utilization, noted Ms. Saxton.

Connectivity is also an issue for some, especially practices in rural areas of the state or organizations that have not yet adopted EHRs, which will ultimately be required for participation.

Compared to non-BCBSM-designated PCMHs, the organization’s medical homes have produced some significant results, including an 11.2 percent decrease in primary-care related ED visits and a 6.7 percent reduction in low-tech radiology usage.

Ms. Saxton shares more on physician incentives and rewards and some outstanding primary care collaborations that have resulted from the engagement of specialists in BCBSM’s medical home program in this audio interview.