Posts Tagged ‘social media in healthcare’

Infographic: 5 Healthcare Social Media Facts You Should Know

December 15th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

The role of social media in healthcare is continuing to increase as social media adoption grows.

A new infographic by Health Care Social Media Monitor examines 5 key healthcare social media trends.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

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Infographic: Patient Engagement in the Age of Social Media

June 2nd, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Effective patient engagement has been linked with increased adherence to medical plans, reduced hospitalizations, and higher revenues, according to a new infographic by ChartLogic. One way to generate these results is by meeting patients where they spend the most time, i.e. social media.

When healthcare consumers connect with physicians or healthcare providers through one of the major social channels (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc), their first experience should be a positive one, with good information on how to get in touch. Links to helpful health apps and portals are also appreciated. Developing a social strategy should be a cornerstone of every organization’s patient engagement strategy.

The infographic examines how practices can increase patient engagement, why it’s a good thing, and potential benefits.

Patient-centric interventions like population health management, health coaching, home visits and telephonic outreach are designed to engage individuals in health self-management—contributing to healthier clinical and financial results in healthcare’s value-based reimbursement climate.

But when organizations consistently rank patient engagement as their most critical care challenge, as hundreds have in response to HIN benchmark surveys, which strategies will help to bring about the desired health behavior change in high-risk populations?

9 Protocols to Promote Patient Engagement in High-Risk, High-Cost Populations presents a collection of tactics that are successfully activating the most resistant, hard-to-engage patients and health plan members in chronic condition management. Whether an organization refers to this population segment as high-risk, high-cost, clinically complex, high-utilizer or simply top-of-the-pyramid ‘VIPs,’ the touch points and technologies in this resource will recharge their care coordination approach.

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Infographic: Social Media’s Impact on Health Literacy

July 22nd, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Healthcare costs attributed to wasteful spending are estimated to be $800 million each year, according to a new infographic by iTriage.

Half of that total can be attributed, directly or indirectly, to low health literacy, including missed prevention opportunities; preventable errors; and unnecessary services or patients going to the ER when less expensive yet appropriate care could be obtained at another facility.

The infographic examines the opportunities for social media to improve health literacy.

Advancing Health Literacy: A Framework for Understanding and ActionAdvancing Health Literacy: A Framework for Understanding and Action addresses the crisis in health literacy in the United States and around the world. This book thoroughly examines the critical role of literacy in public health and outlines a practical, effective model that bridges the gap between health education, health promotion, and health communication.

Step by step, the authors outline the theory and practice of health literacy from a public health perspective. This comprehensive resource includes the history of health literacy, theoretical foundations of health and language literacy, the role of the media, a series of case studies on important topics including prenatal care, anthrax, HIV/AIDS, genomics, and diabetes.

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Infographic: The Healthcare Social Shakeup

February 9th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Hospitals, clinical practices and physicians of all ages are becoming more and more active on social media, according to a new infographic by CDW Healthcare.

Patients are using social media channels to search health information and become more informed about their care, rate the quality of care they receive from providers and reach out to their peers to ask for health advice. Physicians are seeing increasing value in social for their own health and research discussions with colleagues — utilizing it to become more informed on patient care resources and for career development and networking. In fact, 60% of doctors say social media improves the quality of care delivered to patients.

This infographic examines how healthcare organizations, physician practices and patients are using social media in healthcare.

The Patient-Centered Payoff: Driving Practice Growth Through Image, Culture, and Patient ExperienceFor the first time medical practices and organizations are about to see their income either increase or decline based on regulations that directly measure patient care and satisfaction. CMS has now made the patient experience its business.

Learn the steps your practice can take to reap the many payoffs of achieving high patient-centered standards without having to make a big financial investment. In The Patient-Centered Payoff: Driving Practice Growth Through Image, Culture and Patient Experience, authors Cheryl Bisera and Judy Capko explain how healthcare professionals and organizations can thrive in the new patient-centered environment.

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Infographic: How Social Networks Predict Epidemics

February 19th, 2013 by Melanie Matthews

In the future, social networks such as Twitter may well help to predict flu outbreaks. Traditional flu tracking performed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) relies on outpatient reporting and virological test results supplied by laboratories nationwide that confirms an outbreak within 2 weeks after it has begun.

Researchers at the University of Rochester in New York have used Twitter to track the outbreak of flu through New York utilizing a learning model to determine when healthy people would get sick with the flu. The study, performed by Adam Sadilek and his team, analyzed 4.4 million tweets that contained GPS location data from some 630,000 users in New York City over one month in 2010, using an algorithm that learned the difference between actual reports of illness and other, non-relative uses of words such as “sick.” The results were then plotted on a heatmap used to predict which people in a certain area were at risk of contagion up to eight days in advance.

Social media website, Sickweather declared that the flu season began October 18th, six weeks before the CDC’s official announcement. Sickweather utilized tracking and analysis via social media to predict the start of the flu season after seeing a 77 percent increase in social media reports mentioning flu between August and September. The CDC has even collaborated with Google using their Google Flu Trends tool as a potential source for early outbreak warnings. Other social media tools such as Flunearyou.org have 20,000 volunteers who are tracking their symptoms, narrowing the spread of flu down to your ZIP code.

MPHProgramsList, an advocate for public health student education has created the infographic visuliazation shown below that highlights the growing influence of social media’s ability to monitor and accurately track public health trends.

how social networks predict epidemics

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You may also be interested in this related resource: Establishing, Managing and Protecting Your Online Reputation: A Social Media Guide for Physicians and Medical Practices.