Posts Tagged ‘remote patient monitoring’

Remote Patient Monitoring Fosters a New Generation of Care Management and Preventive and Value-Based Care

April 5th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Remote Patient Monitoring

Moving healthcare out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into remote patient monitoring.

As healthcare moves out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into patients’ homes and their workplaces, and becomes much more proactive, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) has been expanding its remote patient monitoring program to foster a new generation of care management, preventive care and value-based care, according to Dr. Ravi Ramani, director of UPMC’s Integrative Heart Failure Program.

The remote patient monitoring program at UPMC has its roots in the heart failure program but has since expanded to additional disease states across the integrated delivery system’s continuum of care.

After achieving reductions in all-cause readmission rates from its remote monitoring of heart failure patients, UPMC knew that the clinical processes were effective and, therefore, was ready to scale the program, said Dr. Ramani during Remote Patient Monitoring at UPMC: Creating Early Warning Systems To Reduce Unplanned Healthcare Utilization, a March 2018 webinar now available for replay.

“To really scale the program and get into the population level management,” said Dr. Ramani, “we really need a vastly reduced cost per unit. The only way to really do this is to leverage what the patients already have, which is ‘Bring Your Own Device.'”

UPMC also focused on refining their operational model so that they select the right patients, put them through an appropriate care pathway, and then integrate all of its other resources to work together, including analytics, operations and finances.

During the webinar, Dr. Ramani shared how UPMC: aligned its various stakeholders for remote patient monitoring success; assessed its hardware needs as patients transitioned through high-risk and low-risk stratifications; leveraged its Enterprise Master Patient Index for remote patient monitoring; and developed its clinical process for bringing new disease states into remote patient monitoring. Dr. Ramani also shared the impact of the program on unplanned care, including ED visits and admissions, and patient satisfaction.

Listen to Dr. Ramani share UPMC’s nine-point vision for a sustainable, scalable remote patient monitoring program.

Infographic: Top 5 Digital Healthcare Transformation Trends

March 21st, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Digital transformation is reshaping every industry and the healthcare industry is no exception, according to a new infographic by Estuate Inc.

The infographic examines five key digital transformation trends that are altering the way healthcare is delivered.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient MonitoringArtificial intelligence. Automation. Blockchain. Robotics. Once the domain of science fiction, these telehealth technologies have begun to transform the fabric of healthcare delivery systems. As further proof of telehealth’s explosive growth, the use of wearable health-tracking devices and remote patient monitoring has proliferated, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has added several new provider telehealth billing codes for calendar year 2018.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring delivers the latest actionable telehealth and remote patient monitoring metrics on tools, applications, challenges, successes and ROI from healthcare organizations across the care spectrum. This 60-page report, now in its fifth edition, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and remote patient monitoring initiatives as well as the use of emerging technologies in the healthcare space.

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HINfographic: Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring: No Limit to Where ‘Doctor Will See You Now’

March 14th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

No longer reserved for rural populations, telehealth is proving a game-changer across the care continuum, as telepsychiatry, tele-ERs, tele-ICUs and even telepharmacies proliferate. Telehealth adoption rose from 63 percent in 2015 to 74 percent in 2018, according to the latest Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring Survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

A new infographic by the Healthcare Intelligence Network examines clinical telehealth uses, telehealth-EHR integration and the use of free and/or discounted healthcare wearables.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient MonitoringArtificial intelligence. Automation. Blockchain. Robotics. Once the domain of science fiction, these telehealth technologies have begun to transform the fabric of healthcare delivery systems. As further proof of telehealth’s explosive growth, the use of wearable health-tracking devices and remote patient monitoring has proliferated, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has added several new provider telehealth billing codes for calendar year 2018.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring delivers the latest actionable telehealth and remote patient monitoring metrics on tools, applications, challenges, successes and ROI from healthcare organizations across the care spectrum. This 60-page report, now in its fifth edition, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and remote patient monitoring initiatives as well as the use of emerging technologies in the healthcare space. Click here for more information.

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Infographic: Drivers of Remote Patient Monitoring

June 21st, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Improving care, enhancing patient satisfaction and cost savings are just a few of the drivers of remote patient monitoring, according to statistics cited in a new infographic by CRF Health.

The infographic examines how remote patient monitoring achieves these goals.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

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Infographic: Empowered Digital Patients

November 18th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Today’s empowered digital patients desire smarter, more connected care, according to a new infographic by CDW Healthcare.

The infographic examines the technology making the rounds across healthcare settings to deliver value to patients and providers.

Empowered Digital Patients

Real-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels.

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Infographic: Using Big Data To Save Lives

October 5th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Healthcare organizations are challenged by the large amounts of healthcare data they collect, according to a new infographic by IBM.

The infographic examines the amount of data that healthcare organizations receive and the potential for that data to save lives.

Using Big Data To Save Lives

From home sensors that track daily motion and sleep abnormalities to video visits via teleconferencing, Humana’s nine pilots of remote patient monitoring test technologies to keep the frail elderly at home as long as possible. When integrated with telephonic care management, remote monitoring has helped to avert medical emergencies and preventable hospitalizations among individuals with serious medical and functional challenges.

In Remote Patient Monitoring for Enhanced Care Coordination: Technology to Manage an Aging Population, Gail Miller, vice president of telephonic clinical operations in Humana’s care management organization, Humana Cares/SeniorBridge, reviews Humana’s expanded continuum of care aimed at improving health outcomes, increasing satisfaction and reducing overall healthcare costs with a more holistic approach.

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Infographic: Delivering Quality Care Through Remote Patient Monitoring

September 30th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

With remote patient monitoring, patients can share vital healthcare information using mobile devices at anytime from anywhere.

A new infographic from Vigyanix looks at expected growth in the remote patient monitoring market, the major players in the remote monitoring space, how remote patient monitoring can be used to improve healthcare delivery and the barriers to implementation.

Delivering Quality Care Through Remote Patient Monitoring

Recent market data on telehealth in general and the patient-centered medical home in particular identified home health monitoring as a key care coordination strategy for individuals with complex illnesses as well as a host of vulnerable populations.

2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring delivers a comprehensive set of metrics from more than 100 healthcare organizations on current practices in and ramifications of remote monitoring for care management of chronic illness, the frail elderly and remote populations.

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Telehealth, Wearables Tighten Provider-Patient Connection

June 16th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Remote monitoring of high-risk individuals engages patients in self-care of chronic illness.

It’s become a mantra in healthcare: “Meet patients where they are.”

The emergent field of telehealth helps to make this a reality. Almost two-thirds of respondents to this year’s Telehealth and Telemedicine Survey have a direct connection to patients and health plan members in their homes via remote monitoring—a vital telehealth strategy for management of high-risk, high-cost populations that continues to surge in popularity.

Our fourth comprehensive Telehealth survey captured dozens of data points and trends, including how the use of ‘vintage’ tools like fax machines and land lines for telehealth delivery has given way to wireless and smart phone technologies patients carry on their person 24/7. Wireless telehealth applications jumped 13 percent in two years, respondents tell us, while telemedicine smart phone apps increased by 10 percent.

And let us not forget the wearables: 26 percent of healthcare respondents embrace this category of personal devices that are buckled or strapped onto the individuals whose care they manage and programmed to transmit health and fitness data. We can only speculate how the Apple® Watch, with its three rings that provide a visual snapshot of the wearer’s daily activity, will impact wearables metrics once the device debuts this summer.

High-tech obsessions and gadget-heads aside, telehealth live-streams care to populations needing it most: rural residents requiring specialist diagnostics but perhaps lacking the means or time to travel to the office of an orthopedist or a dermatologist, two specialties that participate in a groundbreaking multi-specialty telehealth collaborative in California.

Though telehealth faces a bandwidth worth of barriers, not the least of which are reimbursement and physician engagement, it’s exciting to visualize what this year’s respondents have in store for populations they serve. If the plans they shared come to fruition, telehealth in 2015 will variously link veterans, the mentally ill, women with high-risk pregnancies, pediatric patients and even employees at work sites to a hub of remote services designed to integrate care and boost population health outcomes.

Stay tuned.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine

Telehealth & Telemedicine

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Overcoming ‘Clinical Inertia’ and 7 Other Barriers to Remote Patient Monitoring

February 26th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

It’s important to identify potential barriers from both patients and providers before implementing a telehealth program, says Susan Lehrer, RN, CDE, associate executive director of the telehealth office for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (NYCHHC), because both groups need to change behaviors. Resistance to change is universal, and if you’re changing any kind of work flow or communication, there will be initial resistance.

  • Slow buy-in and some resistance by clinicians (referrals).
  • Clinicians concerned with appearance of decreased productivity.
  • Resistance to change in clinic work flow.
  • Inability to “integrate” Web site data and electronic medical records (EMRs).
  • Language and literacy.
  • Complexity of chronic disease management.
  • Lack of protocols for use of email in coordination of care.
  • Not all clinicians utilize secure email system.
  • Source: Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management

    http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Remote-Monitoring-of-High-Risk-Patients-Telehealth-Protocols-for-Chronic-Care-Management_p_5008.html

    Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels. Susan Lehrer, RN, BSN, CDE, associate executive director of the telehealth office for NYCHHC, shares key aspects of the real-time monitoring program, including how the program blends telehealth, electronic medical records, electronic communication with providers and direct communication with patients by nurse case managers, and much more.

    11 Statistics About Remote Patient Monitoring

    December 23rd, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

    Remote monitoring of individuals with multiple chronic conditions reduced hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted disease self-management for nearly all of these monitored patients, according to the 119 respondents who participated in the Healthcare Intelligence Network’s inaugural survey on Remote Patient Monitoring in March 2014. Other targets of a remote monitoring strategy included frequent utilizers of hospitals and emergency rooms (ERs) (62 percent) and the recently discharged (52 percent).

    Following are seven more statistics from the Remote Patient Monitoring survey:

    • Fifty percent of respondents rely on specific diagnoses sets to identify candidates for remote monitoring.
    • More than a quarter of respondents (27 percent) target the frail and/or home-bound with remote monitoring programs.
    • Reimbursement for remote monitoring, followed by the education of patients in this technology, were identified by respondents as the chief challenges of these remote care management efforts.
    • Two-thirds of respondents said remote monitoring reduced bed days.
    • Telephonic case management is a component of remote monitoring efforts for 71 percent of 2014 respondents.
    • About a third of respondents report the use of either a Web interface or a dedicated mHealth app to supplement remote monitoring.
    • A patient-centered touch, such as a follow-up phone reminder to use a monitoring device or a personal coaching session, was frequently cited as a noteworthy supplement to remote monitoring technology.

    Source: 2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring

    http://hin.3dcartstores.com/2014-Healthcare-Benchmarks-Remote-Patient-Monitoring_p_4868.html

    2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring delivers a comprehensive set of metrics from more than 100 healthcare organizations on current practices in and ramifications of remote monitoring for care management of chronic illness, the frail elderly and remote populations.