Posts Tagged ‘remote health monitoring’

Remote Patient Monitoring Fosters a New Generation of Care Management and Preventive and Value-Based Care

April 5th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Remote Patient Monitoring

Moving healthcare out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into remote patient monitoring.

As healthcare moves out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into patients’ homes and their workplaces, and becomes much more proactive, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) has been expanding its remote patient monitoring program to foster a new generation of care management, preventive care and value-based care, according to Dr. Ravi Ramani, director of UPMC’s Integrative Heart Failure Program.

The remote patient monitoring program at UPMC has its roots in the heart failure program but has since expanded to additional disease states across the integrated delivery system’s continuum of care.

After achieving reductions in all-cause readmission rates from its remote monitoring of heart failure patients, UPMC knew that the clinical processes were effective and, therefore, was ready to scale the program, said Dr. Ramani during Remote Patient Monitoring at UPMC: Creating Early Warning Systems To Reduce Unplanned Healthcare Utilization, a March 2018 webinar now available for replay.

“To really scale the program and get into the population level management,” said Dr. Ramani, “we really need a vastly reduced cost per unit. The only way to really do this is to leverage what the patients already have, which is ‘Bring Your Own Device.'”

UPMC also focused on refining their operational model so that they select the right patients, put them through an appropriate care pathway, and then integrate all of its other resources to work together, including analytics, operations and finances.

During the webinar, Dr. Ramani shared how UPMC: aligned its various stakeholders for remote patient monitoring success; assessed its hardware needs as patients transitioned through high-risk and low-risk stratifications; leveraged its Enterprise Master Patient Index for remote patient monitoring; and developed its clinical process for bringing new disease states into remote patient monitoring. Dr. Ramani also shared the impact of the program on unplanned care, including ED visits and admissions, and patient satisfaction.

Listen to Dr. Ramani share UPMC’s nine-point vision for a sustainable, scalable remote patient monitoring program.

Infographic: Drivers of Remote Patient Monitoring

June 21st, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Improving care, enhancing patient satisfaction and cost savings are just a few of the drivers of remote patient monitoring, according to statistics cited in a new infographic by CRF Health.

The infographic examines how remote patient monitoring achieves these goals.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Delivering Quality Care Through Remote Patient Monitoring

September 30th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

With remote patient monitoring, patients can share vital healthcare information using mobile devices at anytime from anywhere.

A new infographic from Vigyanix looks at expected growth in the remote patient monitoring market, the major players in the remote monitoring space, how remote patient monitoring can be used to improve healthcare delivery and the barriers to implementation.

Delivering Quality Care Through Remote Patient Monitoring

Recent market data on telehealth in general and the patient-centered medical home in particular identified home health monitoring as a key care coordination strategy for individuals with complex illnesses as well as a host of vulnerable populations.

2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring delivers a comprehensive set of metrics from more than 100 healthcare organizations on current practices in and ramifications of remote monitoring for care management of chronic illness, the frail elderly and remote populations.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Guest Post: With Rise of Remote Healthcare, Are Physicians Equipped for Engaged Patients?

August 13th, 2014 by Scott Zimmerman

More engaged patients will expect more responsive healthcare professionals.

Thanks to a proliferation of wireless health monitoring tools, healthcare providers must prepare for a new breed of patient who is more tech-savvy and engaged in the management of their own health, advises guest blogger Scott Zimmerman, president of TeleVox Software.

Is your healthcare organization ready for a new breed of patient? Individuals who want or need to play a more active part in their health, and who expect their physicians to do the same?

If it’s not, it may be time to start prepping. Think about consumers’ growing interest in smart devices, sensors and mobile apps for tracking fitness levels. IHS Technology has predicted that global market revenue for sports, fitness and activity monitors will rise by 46 percent, to $2.8 billion, from 2013 through 2019.

That trend is accompanied by employers’ trying to lower their own healthcare costs, by having employees take on higher deductibles or paying only fixed amounts for certain tests or procedures. That’s creating a consumer class more conscious of securing the best health services at the best prices. Increasing personal responsibility in this area may well have a spillover effect, motivating people to become better overall managers of their own health. We may see the same result, too, as more businesses offer wellness incentives that give employees rebates for engaging in better health practices.

Also taking on greater healthcare accountability are individuals with chronic conditions, especially those using wireless home health monitoring tools to track and even transmit EKG, sugar levels and other health statistics to their providers’ systems. IHS Technology has studied this area, too, finding that worldwide revenue for telehealth devices and services used for monitoring diseases and conditions will grow to $4.5 billion in 2018, up from $440.6 million in 2013.

What Have You Done For Me Lately?

As consumers become more savvy and more engaged participants in their healthcare, they may have increased expectations about how providers will respond to their efforts. As they become better equipped to remotely transmit healthcare data to their doctors, for example, they may naturally assume providers are equally well-equipped to provide feedback on that information in real-time—or at least something close to it.

After all, while it’s nice to have direct feedback from a wireless activity wristband on daily calorie intake, that data may be even more useful if a physician can analyze it in context with other patient data—such as information in the EMR that the individual has Type 2 diabetes and blood glucose levels recorded by a home health monitoring device. The healthcare practitioner may conclude from all these measurements that calorie intake should actually be reduced now that blood glucose control has improved, in order to avoid weight gain. It’s understandable if the patient would like to be informed of that as soon as the conclusion is reached, rather than waiting for the next scheduled appointment.

Just-in-time patient engagement, then, is the direction in which healthcare providers must move. Consider that three in ten U.S. consumers responding to TeleVox’s Healthy World Research Survey said that receiving text messages, voicemails or e-mails that provide patient care between visits would increase feelings of trust in their provider. Of those who have received such communications, 51 percent reported feeling more valued as a patient, and 34 percent reported feeling more certain about visiting that healthcare provider again.

An Eye Toward the Future

Today, tens of thousands of healthcare providers already have started down that road of between-visit engagement, with automated appointment, prescription and treatment notification and reminder systems that use the patient’s medium of choice—e-mail, text or voice. In fact, TeleVox’s survey showed that more than 35 percent of patients who don’t follow exact treatment plans said they would be more likely to adhere to directions if they received reminders from their doctors via these methods. Though the outreach is automated and one-to-many, the systems feel one-to-one, as they are personalized with the patient’s name and other details drawn from providers’ practice management systems.

Ochsner Health System in Louisiana is among healthcare providers who have successfully leveraged this technology. It deployed an automated phone campaign to 3,000-plus patients who had been ordered to have colonoscopies and upper endoscopies, but had not scheduled the exams. The phone messages even offered patients the option to book the appointment by pressing a key while on the line. Of the patients reached, close to 20 percent made the appointment.

This was a win-win for patients and providers. Colon cancer detected and treated early has a nearly 100 percent success rate. These patients told Ochsner that without the automated notification, they never would have completed the test. As for the health system, Ochsner generated more than $600,000 in revenue from conducting the exams.

Today, the industry is just scratching the surface of how it can use communications technology to help healthcare providers better engage with patients between visits. The future holds the promise for more providers to obtain more data from EMRs, sensors, wearable medical devices, and home health monitoring tools; feed this data into patient engagement systems, and use business rules to trigger just-in-time customized patient engagement communications. A worrisome remote ECG reading transmitted from a heart disease patient’s home monitoring device, for example, can drive a follow-up action such as a time-sensitive outbound call to the first available specialist.

While getting to this level might sound a little daunting, it doesn’t have to be. Providers can take on the project in stages, moving from general reminders about preventive tests to follow-up messages aimed at those with chronic conditions, before they tackle real-time or near real-time responses to data submissions generated via remote healthcare devices. For instance, daily text messages could be scheduled to go out to obese patients querying them about whether they have met their daily walking goal. Or, treatment protocol compliance reminders, such as retinal and foot exams for diabetic patients, could be scheduled at regular intervals.

All that said, I suspect most providers are looking to this future less with trepidation than with excitement. They’re in the healthcare business, after all, because they want to help people. Now, the doors are open for them to have more regular and proactive contact with their patients, as well as respond more quickly to potentially dangerous situations.

About the Author: Scott Zimmerman is a regularly published authority on utilizing technology to engage and activate patients. He also spearheads TeleVox’s Healthy World initiative, which leverages ethnographic research to uncover, understand and interpret both patient and provider points of view with the end goal of creating a healthy world, one person at a time. Healthier World promotes the idea that touching the hearts and minds of patients by engaging with them between healthcare appointments will encourage and inspire them to follow and embrace treatment plans, and that activating these positive behaviors leads to healthier lives. Zimmerman possesses 20 years of proven performance in the healthcare industry, and currently serves as the president of TeleVox Software, Inc, a high-tech engagement communications company that provides automated voice, e-mail, SMS and web solutions that activate positive patient behaviors by applying technology to deliver a human touch. www.televox.com

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.