Posts Tagged ‘primary care physicians’

Infographic: Physician Health and Patient Care Impacted by Practice Demands

October 6th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

The demands of practicing medicine are negatively impacting primary care doctors and their patients, according to a new infographic by MDVIP.

The infographic examines how stress is impacting physicians and how this affects patients, along with details on what’s contributing most to physician stress.

UnityPoint Health has moved from a siloed approach to improving the patient experience at each of its locations to a system-wide approach that encompasses a consistent, baseline experience while still allowing for each institution to address its specific needs.

Armed with data from its Press Ganey and CAHPS® Hospital Survey scores, UnityPoint’s patient experience team developed a front-line staff-driven improvement action plan.

Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action Plan, a 45-minute webinar on July 27th, now available for replay, Paige Moore, director, patient experience at UnityPoint Health—Des Moines, shares how the organization switched from a top-down, leadership-driven patient experience improvement approach to one that engages front-line staff to own the process.

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9 Hospital Discharge Communications Tactics to Curb Readmissions

January 27th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

For heart failure patients making the transition from hospital to home, an effective discharge summary can mean the difference in whether the patient recovers quickly or returns to the hospital, according to two new studies from Yale School of Medicine researchers. To be effective, discharge summaries must have three key factors: they must be timely, be quickly forwarded to the outside physician, and contain detailed and useful information.

We asked the 116 respondents to the fourth annual Healthcare Intelligence Network’s (HIN) Reducing Hospital Readmissions Survey, conducted in December 2013, what hospital discharge communications tools they used to lower their readmissions rate. Following are their responses.

  • Follow-up with patient post-facility discharge by case managers embedded in our physician practices.
  • Improved communication between inpatient (hospital) care coordination and outpatient (medical group) services.
  • Follow-up appointments with the doctor and home care arrangements are made prior to discharge from the facility if appropriate. Discharge information with medications are sent to the doctor’s office by the facility doctor on discharge for availability on follow-up appointment.
  • Increased oversight of high-risk patients; increased communication among clinical teams and health providers.
  • We utilize a transitional care program to engage with patients while in facility and continue to follow with in-home visits on discharge to continue education and teach-back as well as monitor and oversee progress.
  • Post-acute touch (home health) within 24 hours of discharge; medication reconciliation, signs and symptoms education and scheduling primary care physician (PCP) office visit appointment.
  • All discharges are called by our nursing supervisor or other designee to determine their post-discharge status and ensure they keep their follow-up primary care appointment.
  • Reaching the patient within one to two days post-discharge. Assuring the patients have a follow-up appointment and transportation, understand discharge medications, red flag symptoms and who to call if necessary.
  • Follow-up in the home for 35 days post-transition to home.

Source: 2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Reducing Hospital Readmissions

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/2014-Healthcare-Benchmarks-Reducing-Hospital-Readmissions_p_4786.html

2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Reducing Hospital Readmissions documents the latest key initiatives and partnerships to reduce readmissions by patients with these costly conditions and others by more than 100 healthcare organizations.

9 Things to Know About Palliative Care

June 12th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

With an aging population that is living longer—an estimated 10,000 baby boomers become eligible for Medicare each day — and a shortage of specialists trained for the field, palliative care is no longer taking a back seat to more traditional healthcare. The majority of respondents to the Healthcare Intelligence Network’s first annual Palliative Care survey in February 2014 said they have a palliative care program in place, and of those that don’t, more than half said they planned to launch a program within 12 months.

Here are nine benchmarks gleaned from the 2014 Palliative Care survey:

  • Timely referrals of patients to palliative care are one of the biggest challenges to implementing a program, according to 89 percent of respondents.
  • Frailty is a key characteristic of their palliative patient/member population, say 48 percent of respondents; other traits include impaired cognitive capacity (34 percent) and disabilities (15 percent).
  • „„Candidates for palliative care are primarily identified by physician referrals (78 percent).
  • More than half (60 percent) of respondents said that case management assessments were important tools for identifying palliative care candidates.
  • While the majority of respondents (68 percent) administer palliative care on an inpatient basis, more than half (54 percent) say care is conducted on home visits and just under a third offer palliative care at extended care facilities.
  • About 88 percent of respondents with palliative care programs reported an increase in patient satisfaction levels among Medicare participants, while 89 percent saw more satisfaction among caregivers.
  • Overall, the presence of palliative care helped to curb healthcare utilization costs for 70 percent of respondents.
  • Seventy-one percent of respondents with palliative care programs in place reported an uptick in hospice election by Medicare patients.
  • Nearly 20 percent of respondents said it was too early to tell what ROI their palliative care program generated.

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Excerpted from 2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Palliative Care

Nurse Practitioners Slowly Gain More Access to Patients; Could Relieve Anticipated Physician Shortage

June 5th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

Patients are slowly gaining access to care provided by advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs) as a number of states have taken steps to loosen restrictions on highly educated nurse practitioners (NPs).

Minnesota became the 19th state, plus the District of Columbia, tooffer patients full and direct access to NP service. According to the American Association of Nurse Practitioners (AANP), it is an important step that improves access to care and more effectively uses NPs to meet the state’s growing healthcare needs. Officials state the following in a press release:

This comes at a time when the changing demographics of health care, especially primary care, necessitates that states make full use of the nurse practitioner workforce. The nursing community is committed to addressing these challenges in future sessions to ensure that patients have a choice of health provider and receive full access to the health services they need.

Maryland was one of the first states to loosen existing restrictions, according to a story from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF). In 2010 the state replaced its requirement for lengthy collaborative agreements between NPs and physicians with less cumbersome “attestation statements” that identify a physician who is willing to collaborate when clinically necessary but do not require physician signatures.

The law eliminated situations where patients were left without care if their physician died, retired, or left the state. NPs can now open practices and serve larger patient populations. This has helped with the primary care shortage in Maryland.

And the shortage is not limited to Maryland. As the Healthcare Intelligence Network reported in a previous news story in 2013, the RAND Corporation predicted that as more Americans seek health services once newly insured under the Affordable Care Act (ACA), physician shortages could worsen, and reach as high as 45,000 by 2025.

And the recent Veterans Affairs problem that is making headlines around the world has been attributed to a shortage of primary care physicians (PCPs), as documented here in the New York Times.

Expanding the role of nurse practitioners and physician assistants could help eliminate the anticipated shortage of PCPs over the next decade, the RAND report suggested.

Other states that have taken steps to ease NP restrictions in recent years include the following:

  • In Utah, state Medicaid officials agreed to recognize and reimburse NPs for primary care services for beneficiaries.
  • Oregon’s governor signed a law that allows NPs and clinical nurse specialists to dispense prescription drugs.
  • In Iowa, the state Supreme Court ruled that NPs can supervise fluoroscopy, a high-tech X-ray, without physician supervision.
  • In 2011, North Dakota scrapped a requirement that NPs work in collaboration with physicians.

But these changes are not without their controversy. Some feel that it goes too far, that the supervision of a physician should be maintained. According to this editorial in the Times-Herald Record, “though well intentioned, such proposals underestimate the clinical importance of physicians’ expertise and overestimate the cost-effectiveness of nurse practitioners.”

Other areas of healthcare pose the same challenge. In Minnesota, a state law allows dental therapists to work under the supervision of dentists and perform many of the tasks they do, something that has been opposed nationally and in most other states.

But the field of NPs is also changing. First created in 1965 to meet the growing demand for basic pediatric care, by 2015 all new NPs will need to be trained at the doctorate level as a Doctor of Nursing Practice, and 104 new DNP programs are in development, according to a new infographic from Maryville University Master of Science in Nursing Online.

Infographic: Primary Care Physicians Use of Digital

June 2nd, 2014 by Jackie Lyons

Forty percent of primary care physicians (PCPs) research prescription options on their smartphones with their patients in the exam room, according to a new infographic from the Digital Insights Group.

This infographic also highlights the use of digital, mobile, apps and clinical resources online by U.S. PCPs.

Individually, mHealth devices, applications, and systems enhance the communication capabilities of patients, providers, payors, and other participants in the global healthcare ecosystem. mHealth: Global Opportunities and Challenges provides a practical guide for these individuals and organizations making plans for the future.

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