Posts Tagged ‘post acute’

Infographic: Real-Time Communication Is Key to Improving Post-Acute Care Transitions

September 11th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

When it comes to transitions between inpatient, post-acute, and home environment settings, nearly three quarters (71%) of the NEJM Catalyst Insights Council respondents to its Care Redesign survey on Strengthening the Post-Acute Care Coordination believe that improved real-time communication is the biggest opportunity to improve post-acute transitions. Survey results are highlighted in a new infographic by NEJM Catalyst.

The infographic also examines other strategies for improving post-acute care transitions.

A Collaborative Blueprint for Reducing SNF Readmissions: Driving Results with Quality Reporting and Performance Metrics
Concerned about escalating hospital readmissions from skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) and the accompanying pinch of Medicare readmissions penalties, three Michigan healthcare organizations set competition aside to collaborate and reduce rehospitalizations from SNFs.

To solidify their coordinated approach, Henry Ford Health System (HFHS), the Detroit Medical Center and St. John’s Providence Health System formed the Tri-County SNF Collaborative with support from the Michigan Quality Improvement Organization (MPRO).

A Collaborative Blueprint for Reducing SNF Readmissions: Driving Results with Quality Reporting and Performance Metrics examines the evolution of the Tri-County SNF Collaborative, as well as the set of clinical and quality targets and metrics with which it operates.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Optimizing Post-Acute Care

October 17th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Seventy-five percent of hospital readmissions are preventable—more than $17 billion annually is wasted due to readmissions within 30 days, according to a new infographic by CareCentrix.

The infographic lists four keys to success in improving post-acute care and reducing readmissions.

Medicare’s proposed payment rates and quality programs for skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) for 2017 and beyond solidify post-acute care’s (PAC) partnership in the transformation of healthcare delivery. Subsequent to the Improving Medicare Post-Acute Care Transformation Act of 2014 (IMPACT Act), forward-thinking PAC organizations realized the need to rethink patient care—not just in their own facilities but as patients move from hospital to SNF, home health or rehabilitation facility.

Post-Acute Care Trends: Cross-Setting Collaborations to Align Clinical Standards and Provider Demands examines a collaboration between the first URAC-accredited clinically integrated network in the country and one of its partnering PAC providers to map out and enhance a patient’s journey through the network continuum—drilling down to improve the quality of the transition from acute to post-acute care.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Post-Acute Care Payment Bundles: Catalyst for Clinical Redesign, Improved Care Transitions

July 30th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Brooks Rehabilitation jumped at the opportunity to participate in CMS’ Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) program to be at the forefront of learning more about healthcare payment reform, said Debbie Reber, MHS, OTR, vice president of clinical services, Brooks Rehabilitation.

We saw it as an opportunity for post-acute care providers to help make some of the healthcare policy changes related to the future of healthcare reimbursement. We also really want it to serve as a catalyst for our business to begin working better as a system of care, Ms. Reber explained during last month’s webinar, Bundled Payments for Post-Acute Care: Four Critical Paths To Success, a Healthcare Intelligence Network webinar now available for replay.

Post-Acute Care Payment Bundles: Catalyst for Clinical Redesign, Improved Care Transitions

Brooks Rehabilitation achieves 19 percent savings over historic spend and reduces readmission rates to 15 percent through Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Program.

“Our move toward bundled payments was a great opportunity to improve our care transitions, our continuum,” said Reber. “The other huge opportunity is to experiment with clinical redesign. As we approached bundle pay, we approached it with ‘we have a blank slate. We can redesign the care to look and feel however we want it to be. If we were doing things all over again, what are the things or the gaps or cracks to the clinical care that we could really improve upon?'”

“We knew that we wanted to have a strong voice regarding future policy and payment reform changes. We really wanted to show that we were sophisticated enough to take risk and play a primary role with that continuum of care,” she added.

Brooks is serving under CMS’ Model 3, in which it selects from a list of DRGs. It started in October 2013 with fractures, hip and knee replacements as well as hip and knee revisions.

Brooks added congestive heart failure, non-cervical and cervical fusions and back and neck surgery bundles this past April.

“All of our bundles are for an episode length of 60 days with the only exception to that being congestive heart failure. We did heart failure for 30 days just due to the tremendous risk of managing those cases and to decrease our risk overall with that population,” Reber explained.

Brooks begins its process when the patient leaves the acute care facility.

“We are then responsible for all non-hospice Part A and B services, including physician visits, DME, medications, post-acute therapy or rehab services, as well as any readmission,” she said. Of particular note is that the readmissions are not just related to the acute episodes that we are seeing them for…it’s for any reason that the patient would be readmitted.

Understanding what those readmission reasons are is huge to our success, Reber explained. For example, on the orthopedic side, even though the patients have just been seen for an orthopedic surgery, the primary reason for readmission is predominantly around cardiac issues or pulmonary issues that are more likely due to prior comorbidities. It’s really just managing those issues more.

Brooks has achieved an overall savings of about 19 percent over its historic spend and has decreased its readmission rate to about 15 percent across the 60-day time frame within this program. And, has also seen increases in patient functional improvement and patient satisfaction rates.

During the webinar, Reber walked participants through the four domains that have been critical to its success in the BPCI program, including: using standardized assessments across care settings; patient and caregiver engagement; the in-house developed Care Compass Tool, which includes a longitudinal care plan; and enhancing the role of the care navigator.

4 Pillars of SNF/Hospital Partnerships

March 13th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

Maintaining contact with patients long after the 30-day discharge period when the penalty phase ends for hospitals is one of the four pillars of Torrance Memorial Health System’s post-acute network philosophy, says Josh Luke, Ph.D., FACHE, vice president post-acute services at Torrance Memorial Health System and founder of the California Readmission Prevention Collaborative and the National Readmission Prevention. This can be done telephonically or in-person, and is usually conducted by an ambulatory case manager.

The main component of our post-acute network is to go into each of the seven SNFS once a week and meet with them for a half hour at the most, covering four tactics. The first is to review a list of all of the patients that have been sent from the hospital over to the SNF, specifically focussing on which ones are discharging that week.

The second tactic is to discuss their discharge disposition, and see if they’re going to a home health agency, and if so, if it’s one that we own, or another one in the community. We distinguish this so we can do what’s called ambulatory case management of the patient, which means we want to case manage them once they go home. We don’t just want to forget about them. We want to keep an eye on them and check in on them, whether it’s telephonically or in person, making sure that they continue to do well, not just through the end of the 30-day episode after discharging from the hospital when the penalty phase ends for hospitals, but also for their long term well-being.

The third tactic is to encourage each of our patients going home from the hospital and SNF to make an appointment at our post-acute clinic (CCC) with the physician who does medication reconciliation. She asks the patients to bring in all the medications they were on before they went to the hospital and all those they were prescribed at the hospital. They then sit and have a 45 minute conversation, including guidelines on what their medication plans are moving forward, which ones they should be taking, and which ones they shouldn’t, and making sure, with teach back methodology, that the patient has a clear understanding of what is expected from them in terms of consuming medication once they return home later that day. Those appointments normally take place within the last 72 hours.

The fourth tactic is to review what we call the ‘return to emergency room’ log. In the industry the common term is ‘return to acute’. We don’t allow our SNFs to use that term because we feel they’re responsible for the ‘return to the emergency department (ED)’. What we mean by that is we’re challenging our SNFs to say, “Take charge of what you can control. And what you can control is making sure that patient doesn’t leave your SNF unnecessarily.” We’re not here to say, “Did the patient get admitted or not to the hospital?” We’re here to ask the SNFs if they followed the guidelines that several organizations nationwide have provided that help avoid unnecessary transfers out to the hospital.

Excerpted from 5 Best Practice Prevention Protocols for Reducing Readmissions.