Posts Tagged ‘physicians’

Infographic: Physician Lifestyle and Happiness 2018 Report

March 16th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Physicians struggle with many of the same issues that other people do—friendships, relationships, exercising and maintaining a healthy weight, according to Medscape’s Physician Lifestyle and Happiness report.

A new infographic by Board Vitals highlights some of the survey findings including what role spiritual beliefs play in physicians’ coping skills, whether physicians are in a committed relationship and physician vacation habits.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2018: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare IndustryHealthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2018: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN’s 14th annual business forecast, is designed to support healthcare C-suite planning as leaders react to presidential priorities and seek new strategies for engaging providers, patients and health plan members in value-based care.

HIN’s highly anticipated annual strategic playbook opens with perspectives from industry thought leader Brian Sanderson, managing principal, healthcare services, Crowe Horwath, who outlines a roadmap to healthcare provider success by examining the key issues, challenges and opportunities facing providers in the year to come. Following Sanderson’s outlook is guidance for healthcare payors from David Buchanan, president, Buchanan Strategies, on navigating seven hot button areas for insurers, from the future of Obamacare to the changing face of telehealth to the surprising role grocery stores might one day play in healthcare delivery. Click here for more information.

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Infographic: Physician Telemedicine Trends

November 20th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

The global telemedicine market is projected to expand by 14.3 percent by 2020, according to a new infographic by Jackson Physician Search.

The infographic examines how the physician and telemedicine industries are impacting healthcare.

Real-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels.

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Infographic: Building a Million-Dollar Physician Relationship

August 1st, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

In today’s competitive healthcare environment, hospitals and health systems are looking to drive patient volume and attract and retain physicians, according to a new infographic by Evariant.

According to Evariant, the financial results of physician relationship management are compelling: A single physician, whether in primary care or a specialty, can generate more than $1.5 million in revenue each year, so it’s a heavy price when referrals and procedures are lost to competitors.

The infographic drills down on how to build an effective physician relationship management strategy.

A profitable by-product of CMS’s aggressive pursuit of value-based healthcare delivery is a menu of revenue opportunities associated with care management of the Medicare population.

Physician Reimbursement in 2016: 4 Billable Medicare Events to Maximize Care Management Revenue and Results details the ways in which Bon Secours Medical Group (BSMG) leverages a team-based care approach, expanded care access and technology to capitalize on four Medicare billing events: transitional care management, chronic care management, Medicare annual wellness visits and advance care planning.

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Accessibility, Visibility Reasons to Embed Case Managers into Primary Care, Workplace

April 30th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

When case managers are embedded into primary care workplaces, both patients and staff benefit, says Melanie Fox BSN, RN, director of embedded case management with Caldwell UNC Healthcare. Instead of delaying a patient’s request for care, staff workers are more likely to address it by going directly to the case manager on site. And some patients are more likely to directly ask the case manager, who they might previously have contacted telephonically.

Some people have embedded case managers but they might not be embedded in the practices. Our case managers are on site. They are available. They are visible. That makes it easy for the staff and the patients because sometimes they’ll think that patient may need something, but are unsure how to make that happen for that patient.

Then they see us or they remember we’re here. They’ll come to us and ask for help, trying to get that patient what they need, whether it be hospice services, VNA services, or just watching a patient’s blood pressure or hemoglobin A1C. If you’re there visible, it makes it so much easier for the staff and as well as the patients.

We have patients that drop by our offices just to see who we are because we’ve talked to them over the telephone. The visibility from us being in the office is great. We seem to be more accepted by the providers and the staff because of that, as well as the patients because they see us as part of the team. They see us working in the office. Sometimes, when we make a phone call to the home, they may accept it sometimes a little better because we’re calling from our clinics. When we mention where we are calling from and the name of the doctor we’re working with, then they’ll talk to us a little more willingly.

It makes that easier. It also helps to engage the patients in the office because they are here. A staff member will pull us into an office and let us know that one of the patients is here to talk to them. We have found that just being in the office is a great asset for the doctors as well as ourselves. It makes our jobs a little bit easier.

Source: Embedded Case Management in Primary Care and Workplace Clinics: Skill Sets, Stratification and Protocols

PHOs Let Quality, Cost Guide Them Toward Value-Based Reimbursement

April 16th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

Instead of focusing on volume, physician-hospital organizations (PHOs) are concentrating on value-based care, says Travis Ansel, senior manager with the Healthcare Strategy Group. The once revenue-based organizations are now focused on quality and cost, realizing that if they can’t manage those two things, their reimbursement will go down.

Why is the PHO model going to work now? We always get this question. This comes more from doctors than it does from administrators: why are PHOs going to work now, when they didn’t work before? The simple answer is that before, PHOs were revenue-focused. They were about getting the biggest number of physicians into the model regardless of their quality. It was run by the hospital as a methodology for increasing rates. Then fee-for-service (FFS) didn’t really give anybody the incentive to work together.

They gave everybody the incentive to sign their name on the contract and hope for better rates. What we’re seeing PHOs focus on now is quality and cost, with the idea that if they can’t manage those two things, their reimbursement is going to go down. We have clinical integration guidance from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which gives everybody the framework for developing joint contracting capabilities and defines legally how we can work together. What we’re seeing now, since there’s more of a clinical than a revenue focus for PHOs, is that they are more dominated by physician leadership. The hospital keeps control over the purse strings, but gives the governance of the group to physicians. They are letting them take the leadership on the cost and quality protocols that they need to develop to be successful.

There is also the way that payment reform is transitioning the incentives. They’re focused on getting quality and cost across populations or across episodes of care. They’re giving the right incentives for collaboration, which the PHO model provides the forum for.

Source: Physician-Hospital Organizations: Framework for Clinical Integration and Value-Based Reimbursement

Home Visits

Physician-Hospital Organizations: Framework for Clinical Integration and Value-Based Reimbursement describes the relevance of the PHO model to today’s healthcare market, offering strategies to leverage the physician-hospital organization for maximum clinical outcomes, competencies and value-based reimbursement.

Incentives Advance PCP-Specialist Communications in Value-Based Health System

January 6th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

In a value-based reimbursement model, primary care physicians need to be quarterbacks for their patients, taking an additional interest in their care and following them to the end zone, or to other specialists providing care, says Chip Howard, Humana’s vice president of payment innovation in the provider development center of excellence. This will foster communication between physicians and specialists, a fundamental problem of the classic fee-for-service model.

Question: How can you manage and reward the complex interactions between primary care physicians (PCPs) and sub-specialists?

Response: (Chip Howard) That’s a pretty common question in the industry these days. If you think back to the old model, the classic fee-for-service model, the PCP potentially loses track of the member as they go to a specialist. The volume-based model is very fragmented. You don’t have communication, a fundamental problem of the model. But I think we’re on a discovery to potentially address that. Some thoughts that come to mind are putting incentives in place that will promote communication between PCP and specialists.

At the end of the day in a primary care model, we’re encouraging the PCPs to be the quarterback of the member’s care, to take that additional interest and follow the member through the path to other specialists that are providing care. There are also obligations on the specialist’s part that you would have to engage because it’s a two-way street.

Some other thoughts: we are starting to explore specialist engagement programs, whether it’s looking at bundled payments or at other sorts of programs that incentivize the specialist to achieve the Triple Aim: higher quality, lower cost, best outcomes. Then, putting data and analytics into the hands of PCPs that will enable them to potentially steer those members to specialists that are proving that they can work to achieve the Triple Aim on behalf of the patient.

There are also some ideas about how to promote interactions between PCPs and sub-specialists and start the ball rolling. That is a lot easier in an integrated system-type environment where there is one system that owns the continuum of care for the most part from PCP to specialist, to outpatient, inpatient, etc.

value-based reimbursement
Chip Howard is vice president, payment innovation in the Provider Development Center of Excellence, Humana. He is responsible for advancing Humana’s Accountable Care Continuum, expanding its Provider Reward Programs, innovative payment models and programs that enable providers to become successful risk-taking population health managers.

Source: Physician Value-Based Reimbursement: Quality Rewards for Population Health

Multi-Specialty Telehealth Collaborative Offers One-Stop Healthcare for Underserved, Remote Patients

October 24th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

It’s all about the patient.

That’s what prompted Blue Shield of California and Adventist Health, both not-for-profit organizations, to collaborate on a telehealth program that could afford quality care to all Californians, when and where they need it, says Lisa Williams, senior director of strategic integration and execution, healthcare quality and affordability, Blue Shield of California, during Creating a Virtual Multi-Specialty Physician Network: A Payor-Provider Telehealth Collaborative, an October 15th webinar, now available for replay.

The presentation also featured Robert Marchuk, vice president of ancillary services at Adventist Health, and Christine Martin, director of operations, Adventist Health; all three shared the inside details on the collaboration and the shared mission and values that has led to the program’s success.

Located in largely rural markets, access to specialists is especially critical for the program’s success, Ms. Williams says. The nine-site program, which launched in March, includes 11 specialties, ranging from cardiology to dermatology to orthopedics and rheumatology, which account for the majority of volume in pre-op and post-op care. Specialists are all board-certified and credentialed. The program will expand to an additional 16 sites by the end of this year, with plans to add telepsychiatry, she says.

Central to the program is its care coordination center, a full-service, virtual, multi-specialty physician practice with robust patient and provider supporting services, says Mr. Marchuk. Similarly to a one-stop shopping site, when patients enter a site, clinicians make one phone call regarding that patient to the center, which coordinates all aspects of that patient’s care, from scheduling an appointment with the provider and the clinic itself, ensuring all patient records are available and uploaded to their electronic medical record (EMR), to scheduling follow-up ancillary services and physician appointments and billing. “It’s been very successful,” says Mr. Marchuk, “and really sets us apart from other programs.”

Identifying gaps in their markets, and then finding the right specialty and specialist for that market are big parts of the process, Mr. Marchuk continues. “There are physicians out there that can be wonderful on a face-to-face visit and very, very good clinically, but don’t necessarily lend themselves well to a video interaction, so we screen very carefully.”

Clinician engagement, extensive training, and communication at all points of contact are also important, says Ms. Martin. “You can never over-communicate,” she says. Patients, staff, local providers and specialty providers all need to know what’s going on, so the experience can be as seamless as possible.

Reimbursement for telehealth is still on the negotiation table, Mr. Marchuk adds. But ultimately, it pays to invest in the technology now for the future.

“It’s one of the fastest growing growing fields. It’s affordable, accessible, and cost-effective. Telehealth really can enhance the physician and patient relationship.”

Listen to interviews with Robert Marchuk and Lisa Williams.

5 Features of the Patient-Centered Medical Home

October 23rd, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

Patient-centered medical homes (PCMHs) are not about pigeon-holing certain diseases or illnesses, says Terry McGeeney, MD, MBA, director at BDC Advisors, but about delivering acute and chronic care prevention and wellness. Dr. McGeeney reiterated the five essential features of the medical home as the groundwork for a medical neighborhood.

Given many of the initiatives of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), coupled with the Triple Aim, many have gotten bogged down and probably overly focused on the name: patient-centered medical home (PCMH). What’s important are the features or attributes of the PCMH: first, its patient-centeredness, a partnership among practitioners, patients and their families that ensures and respects the decisions of the patients and ensures patients have the education and support they need.

Secondly, in a PCMH, the care needs to be comprehensive. It’s a team of care providers who are wholly accountable for a patient’s physical and mental healthcare needs, including prevention and wellness, acute care, and chronic care.

Third, you will hear discussions about the PCMH being about a certain disease or illness. Please note that it’s acute and chronic care prevention and wellness. Pigeon-holing conditions, while important, is more of a chronic quality improvement initiative and not PCMH.

Fourth, under the PCMH, care needs to be coordinated. Care is organized across all elements of the broader healthcare system, including specialists, hospital, home healthcare, community service and support. There’s a lot of debate now about what we call ‘post-acute care’ or ‘transitions in care.’ Jonathan Blum, principal deputy administrator of CMS, recently spoke on the importance of post-acute care. This is what coordinated care particularly is all about.

Care has to be accessible. Patients are able to access services with shorter waiting times, after-hours care with access to EHRs, etc., and there has to be a commitment to quality and safety. Clinicians and staff need to enhance quality improvement with the use of health IT and other tools that are available to them.

We also need to be very careful that quality care is not equated with lower cost of care. Sometimes those two have a tendency to get muddled.

Source: Blueprint for a Medical Neighborhood: Building Care Coordination Between Specialists and PCPs

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Blueprint-for-a-Medical-Neighborhood-Building-Care-Coordination-Between-Specialists-and-PCPs_p_4967.html

Blueprint for a Medical Neighborhood: Building Care Coordination Between Specialists and PCPs provides a framework in which to evaluate the patient-centered medical neighborhood (PCM-N) model. Pictured here is Terry McGeeney, MD, MBA, director of BDC Advisors, who navigates the landscape of the medical neighborhood, from the value-based payment realities of healthcare today to identifying and engaging specialists in a medical home neighborhood.

WellPoint Referral Preparedness Tools Support Physician-Specialist Care Compacts

October 2nd, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

With the help of care compacts that drive accountability between primary care physicians and specialists, WellPoint has launched a medical neighborhood pilot for three specialties with clear care coordination alignment opportunities with primary care medical homes. Here, Robert Krebbs, director of payment innovation at WellPoint, Inc., discusses how Wellpoint supports the care compact model with Referral Preparedness Tools— add-ons devised for physician/specialist patient handoffs.

One thing we found interesting was the uniform request from physicians for what we call ‘Referral Preparedness Tools.’ That’s a name we made up. These are add-ons to care compacts that call out common conditions for a given specialty, the conditions for which they often get referrals or consult requests from PCPs. It specifies for that condition what the specialist would like to see for the initial consult or regular repeating referral, and what they want the PCP to do first and send to them and specifically, what they want the PCP not to do—that is, things to avoid before sending the patient over.

On the flip side, the tool lists for that condition what the specialist intends to send back to the PCP. The practice will work on this together for common conditions. The tool doesn’t list everything that could possibly happen, but rather specifies the patient flow for common conditions.

We didn’t initially include this tool in our care compact expectations. The practices asked us for this; they see this as a true opportunity to drive improvement and efficiency in the system, to avoid unneeded care and to make sure that the correct care is provided for all patients.

We’re going to monitor development of these tools throughout the pilot to determine common themes so we can provide a good template starting place on this run as well as for future pilot practices in this program. We’re excited that specialists have made this template their own. They’re hard at work identifying what they’d like to see in these scenarios.

dual eligibles care
Robert Krebbs is the director of payment innovation at WellPoint where he has accountability for the design, development and rollout of value-based payment initiatives. He works directly with network physicians and facilities on innovative performance measurement programs aimed at delivering healthcare value by promoting high quality, affordable care.

Source: Care Compacts in the Medical Neighborhood: Transforming PCP-Specialist Care Coordination

Infographic: Physician Adoption of Health IT

September 29th, 2014 by Melanie Matthews

Physician interest in mhealth is strong, according to Deloitte’s 2014 Survey of U.S. Physicians. Access to clinical information is the most cited benefit of health IT by physicians, the survey also found.

A new Deloitte infographic looks at the difference between physician users and non-users of health IT, patient support of health IT and analysis of meaningful use.

Physician Adoption of Health IT

Transforming Health Care: The Financial Impact of Technology, Electronic Tools and Data Mining The healthcare technology revolution is just around the corner. And when it arrives, it will change and enrich our lives in ways we can only begin to imagine. Doctors will perform blood pressure readings via video chat and nutritionists will analyze diet based on photos taken with cell phone cameras.

Transforming Health Care: The Financial Impact of Technology, Electronic Tools and Data Mining combines healthcare, technology, and finance in an innovative new way that explains the future of healthcare and its effects on patient care, exploring the emergence of electronic tools that will transform the medical industry.

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