Posts Tagged ‘patient empowerment’

Infographic: Patient Empowerment in Healthcare

July 13th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Patient empowerment has the potential to revolutionize healthcare, and it’s happening at a time when patients have more information at hand than ever before. Emerging as a new paradigm, patient empowerment promises to help improve medical outcomes while also lowering healthcare costs, according to a new infographic by LabFinder.

The infographic outlines steps for taking patient empowerment from concept to practice.

Transformational patient-centered models emerging post-ACA are designed to succeed with a core of engaged, activated patients, yet enlistment of individuals in chronic care management, telehealth and other health enhancement interventions continues to challenge the healthcare industry.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Patient Engagement documents strategies, program components, successes and challenges of engaging patients and health plan members in self-care from 133 organizations responding to the 2015 Patient Engagement survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Patient Empowerment

March 9th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

With skyrocketing digital data and a flood of tools to track and manage personal health, patients are taking greater interest in and control of their own healthcare.

A new infographic by CDW Healthcare examines the impact that patient data management, patient portals, the cloud, big data and virtual storage are having on patient self-management.

Evidence-Based Health Coaching: Motivational Interviewing in Action Validated in over 300 clinical studies, motivational interviewing (MI) remains the most patient-centered and effective approach for supporting better patient engagement and activation, disease self-care, treatment adherence and lifestyle management.

Evidence-Based Health Coaching: Motivational Interviewing in Action, is the first MI video training series especially designed for clinicians who serve individuals at risk of, or affected by, chronic diseases. Whether you are serving in a wellness, disease management, or care management program, or a primary or specialty care setting, hospital or community program, this series will help you build the practical MI knowledge and skills you need to support your patient health and address the behavioral factors that are responsible for over 85% of avoidable healthcare costs.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Home Visits 101: Empower the Patient, and Don’t Forget the Gloves

September 2nd, 2014 by Patricia Donovan

It’s hard to plan a home visit for a recently discharged patient if you don’t know they’ve been in the hospital. Obtaining data on hospitalized patients is one of the challenges of administering a home visits program, notes Samantha Valcourt, MS, RN, CNS, a clinical nurse specialist for Stanford Coordinated Care (SCC), a part of Stanford Hospital and Clinics.

Some of the challenges I’ve experienced with our home visits program is first of all, knowing when our patients are actually in the hospital. It’s easy to know when they’re at SCC; I get an electronic communications or an EMR. However, if patients go outside our system, I may not know. Sometimes that discharge summary is not available when I’m ready to go see the patient the day after. Holidays and weekends always increase that 48- to 72-hour window and I really do try to get in there the following day if possible.

For patients that don’t see primary care doctors within our clinic, it can sometimes be a challenge getting hold of their primary care doctor outside of SCC, and then explaining my role and why I need them.

On the back of our patient ID card, we emphasize to our patients to please contact us if they’re even considering going to the emergency department so that perhaps we can avoid a hospital admission or a readmission. If they are being seen in the hospital, we want them to call us as soon as they’re there, as soon as they’re able to, or to have their family member call so we can make sure that we’re involved in that transition.

Another lesson learned is definitely to empower the patient. Again, as a nurse I try to do as much for the patient as I can. But I have to keep in mind that when I’m in the home, my goal is to make sure will be able to identify the red flags and symptoms that indicate things are not going well, and that they’ll be able to contact the doctor’s office with their needs. I make sure that both handoffs are very clear; I never want to leave a patient wondering, ‘Oh I had this nurse and she came into my home and then she called me every few days and then all of a sudden she was gone.’

I need to make sure that I have good communication with that next transition.

And then last, I always carry a set of gloves, because you never know what you’ll walk into. I was not a home health nurse before I did these types of home visits, so I was ill prepared on one of my first visits to a patient with a dialysis catheter that was oozing blood. My nursing instinct caused me to run in there and try to clean things up.

Now I carry a good stock of gloves and supplies, because you just never know.

value-based reimbursement
Samantha Valcourt, MS, RN, CNS, a clinical nurse specialist for Stanford Coordinated Care (SCC), a part of Stanford Hospital and Clinics.

Source: Home Visits for High-Risk Patients: Tools, Timing and Outcomes