Posts Tagged ‘patient education’

3 Priority Populations for Home Visits and 10 More House Calls Benchmarks

February 14th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

More than half of home visits include screening for social determinants of health.

More than half of home visits include screening for social determinants of health.

Which patients should healthcare providers visit at home? A new survey on home visits identified three key populations that should receive home-based care management: the frail elderly and homebound (69 percent); the medically complex (69 percent); and individuals recently discharged from the hospital (68 percent).

In stratifying patients for these home visits, 62 percent rely on care manager referrals.

These were just two findings from the 2017 Home Visits survey conducted by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Nearly three quarters of the survey's 107 respondents visit targeted patients at home, an intervention that can illuminate health-related, socioeconomic or safety determinants that might go undetected during an office visit.

Who's conducting these home visits? In more than half of responding programs, a registered nurse handles the visit, although on rare occasions, patients may open their door to a primary care physician (4 percent), pharmacist (4 percent) or community paramedic (3 percent).

Once inside the home, the visit is first and foremost about patient and caregiver education, say 81 percent of respondents, with an emphasis on medication reconciliation (80 percent). Fifty-nine percent also screen at-home patients for social and economic determinants of health, factors that can have a huge impact on an individual's health status.

Patient engagement, including obtaining consent for home visits, tied with funding and reimbursement issues tied as the top challenges associated with in-home patient visits.

How to know if home visits are working? The most telling success indicator is a reduction in 30-day hospital readmission rates, say 83 percent of survey respondents, followed by a drop in hospital and ER utilization (64 percent). Seventy percent of survey respondents reported either a drop in readmissions or in ER visits.

Here are a few more metrics derived from HIN's 2017 Home Visits survey:

  • Eighty-five percent of respondents believe that the use of in-home technology enhances home visit outcomes.
  • Fifteen percent report home visits ROI of between 2:1 and 3:1.
  • Eighty percent have seen clients’ self-management skills improve as a result of home visits.

Download an executive summary of results from HIN's 2017 Home Visits Survey.

Infographic: Reducing Readmissions Through Patient Education

December 18th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

The importance of care transitions in improving patient safety is illustrated by recent data released by The Joint Commission on sentinel events compiled from January 2014 to October 2015.

The data show a total of 197 sentinel events—from suicide to falls to wrong site surgery—and the root causes included failures in patient communication (127 incidents), patient education (26 incidents) and patient rights (44 incidents). The majority of the patient education failures were related to not assessing the effectiveness of patient education or not providing education. The patient rights failures included absent or incomplete informed consent, and lack of the patient's participation in their care.

In response to these findings, the Joint Commission released an infographic to help healthcare providers in their efforts to reduce patient readmissions and improve the discharge process.

Providers who signed on for San Francisco Health Network's Care Transitions Task Force shared not only a professional passion for care transitions work but also the belief that care transitions responsibility should be spread across the healthcare continuum. And once the SFHN task force mined a 'black box' of administrative data buried in more than 60 siloed databases across its health network, continuum-wide care transition improvement seemed attainable.

Data-Driven Care Transition Management: Action Plans for High-Risk Patients documents how SFHN's deep data dive triggered the development of a data dashboard, a hospital discharge database and a set of uniform standards and practices that have streamlined care transitions within its safety net population.

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Infographic: IoT and Patient Engagement

December 4th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Patient engagement is among the top priorities for most healthcare organizations. Healthcare providers must interact with their patients and empower them with the right information at the right time. The emerging trend of the Internet of Things (IoT) is revolutionizing the world with its vast capabilities of connecting people and things with each other, and the healthcare industry is no exception, according to a new infographic by Vigyanix.

According to IDC Health Insights, 35 percent of healthcare organizations have already implemented IoT either in pilot or production stages. The infographic explores how IoT is helping to increase patient engagement.

Transformational patient-centered models emerging post-ACA are designed to succeed with a core of engaged, activated patients, yet enlistment of individuals in chronic care management, telehealth and other health enhancement interventions continues to challenge the healthcare industry.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Patient Engagement documents strategies, program components, successes and challenges of engaging patients and health plan members in self-care from 133 organizations responding to the 2015 Patient Engagement survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

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Infographic: Patient Demands Drive Health IT Transformation

October 21st, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Today's healthcare consumer demands are driving IT transformation, according to a new infographic by CDW Healthcare.

The infographic examines how patients want to communicate with their physician and new routes of patient education and access to care.

Patient Demands Drive Health IT Transformation

As the healthcare industry's understanding of the importance of an empowered, engaged patient has increased, Intermountain Healthcare changed its mission statement to reflect the critical role of patients in a value-based healthcare system. "Helping people live the healthiest lives possible" embodies the new environment of shared accountability between patients and providers that is fostered at Intermountain Healthcare.

During A Patient Engagement Framework: Intermountain Healthcare's Approach for a Value-Based System, a 45-minute webinar, on October 28th at 1:30 p.m., Tammy Richards, corporate director of patient and clinical engagement at Intermountain Healthcare, will share the key tenets of Intermountain's patient engagement strategy.

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Infographic: The Intersection of Healthcare and IT

August 19th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

Healthcare informatics allow healthcare professionals to promote wellness, protect patient safety and provide higher quality of care by collecting, organizing, analyzing and using data to create patient information within the healthcare system.

Approximately 50,000 health informatics workers will be needed in the next five to seven years, according to a new infographic from the University of Illinois. This infographic, created by the University of Illinois at Chicago's (UIC) Health Informatics Program, also details the various uses of health IT, the roles of health informatics professionals, benefits of utilizing health informatics such as patient education, and more.

The Intersection of Healthcare and IT

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You may also be interested in this related resource: Telemedicine and E-Health Services, Policies, and Applications: Advancements and Developments.

Infographic: Realizing the Value of Health IT

August 8th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

Health information technology (IT) not only affects hospital processes, but also directly improves patient care.

Health IT has generated a 118 percent increase in patient satisfaction, according to a healthcare organization featured in a new infographic from Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). The infographic identifies five kinds of benefits of health IT to patients, healthcare providers and communities.

Realizing the Value of Health IT

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You may also be interested in this related resource: 2013 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine.

Infographic: Does a Tweet a Day Keep the Doctors Away?

January 29th, 2013 by Patricia Donovan

Social health is the mash-up of social media and healthcare, and it’s starting to gain traction. In fact, a third of all consumers use social media for matters regarding their health. Thanks to social networking sites and the increased availability of broadband and mobile technology, people are forming online patient support groups, becoming better educated on medical topics and diagnoses, and sharing doctor and product reviews — wherever and whenever they want.

This trend offers providers a great opportunity to jump into the social health fray. In a 2012 study, 24 percent of doctors said they used social media at least once a day to look for medical information while almost two-thirds think social media enhances their ability to care for their patients.

There are many benefits for providers who take part in social health as well, such as a way to connect with consumers in between visits and allowing healthcare organizations to receive immediate feedback on products and services.

This infographic created for Allied Health World provides valuable insights about this incredible new online movement.

social health

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10 Hallmarks of a Health-Literate Organization

August 23rd, 2012 by Jessica Fornarotto

Recorded Webinar: Patient Engagement in the Patient-Centered Medical Home — A Continuum Approach

Leadership committed to health literacy and easy access to health information are two attributes of an organizational environment that fosters health literacy, suggests a new study reported in the Institute of Medicine (IOM).

It is possible for a healthcare system to redesign its services to better educate patients in the handling of immediate health issues and also become more savvy consumers of medicine in the long run, says the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) and San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center (SFGH) study. The study identified ten attributes that healthcare organizations should adopt to make it easier for people to better navigate health information, make sense of services and better manage their own health — assistance for which there is a profound societal need.

The ten attributes of a health-literate organization are:

  1. Has leadership that makes health literacy integral to its mission, structure and operations.

  2. Integrates health literacy into planning, evaluation measures, patient safety and quality improvement.
  3. Prepares the workforce to be health-literate and monitors progress.
  4. Includes populations served in the design, implementation, and evaluation of health information and services.
  5. Meets the needs of populations with a range of health literacy skills while avoiding stigmatization.
  6. Uses health literacy strategies in interpersonal communications and confirms understanding at all points of contact.
  7. Provides easy access to health information and services and navigation assistance.
  8. Designs and distributes print, audiovisual, and social media content that is easy to understand and act on.
  9. Addresses health literacy in high-risk situations, including care transitions and communications about medicines.
  10. Communicates clearly what health plans cover and what individuals will have to pay for services.

Some 77 million people in the United States have difficulty understanding very basic health information, which clouds their ability to follow doctors’ recommendations, and millions more lack the skills necessary to make clear, informed decisions about their own healthcare, said senior author Dean Schillinger, MD, a UCSF professor of medicine, chief of the Division of General Internal Medicine at SFGH, and director of the Health Communications Program the UCSF Center for Vulnerable Populations at SFGH. “Depending on how you define it, nearly half the U.S. population has poor health literacy skills. Over the last two decades, we have focused on what patients can do to improve their health literacy,” said Schillinger. “In this report, we looked at the other side of the health literacy coin, and focused on what healthcare systems can do.”

The importance of enhancing health literacy has been demonstrated by many clinical studies over the years, said Schillinger. Health literacy is linked directly to patient wellness. People who can understand their health information tend to make better choices, are able to self-manage their chronic conditions, and have better outcomes than people who do not.

Adults with low health literacy may find it difficult to navigate the healthcare system, and are more likely to have higher rates of medication errors, more ER visits and hospitalizations, gaps in their preventive care, increased likelihood of dying, and poorer health outcomes for their children.

Many health policy organizations have recognized that health literacy is not only important to people, but it can also benefit society because helping patients help themselves is a way to keep healthcare costs down. Successful self-management reduces disease complications, cuts down on unnecessary ER visits and eliminates other wasteful spending.

Click here for more information and for a complete description of the ten attributes.