Posts Tagged ‘nursing’

Infographic: How Nursing Leadership Styles Can Impact Patient Outcomes

February 2nd, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Transformational nursing leadership is associated with reductions in medication errors, lower patient mortalities, increased patient satisfaction and lower staff turnover, according to a new infographic by Bradley University.

The infographic examines five nursing leadership styles and their impact on patient outcomes.

UnityPoint Health has moved from a siloed approach to improving the patient experience at each of its locations to a system-wide approach that encompasses a consistent, baseline experience while still allowing for each institution to address its specific needs.

Armed with data from its Press Ganey and CAHPS® Hospital Survey scores, UnityPoint’s patient experience team developed a front-line staff-driven improvement action plan.

Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action Plan, a 45-minute webinar on July 27th, now available for replay, Paige Moore, director, patient experience at UnityPoint Health—Des Moines, shares how the organization switched from a top-down, leadership-driven patient experience improvement approach to one that engages front-line staff to own the process.

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7 Characteristics of a Successful Case Manager

March 3rd, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

What qualities are needed for a successful case manager? A background in community nursing helps, because the case manager can better place themselves in the patient’s shoes, having worked with others from the same background, says Melanie Fox, director of the Caldwell Physician Network Embedded Case Management program at Caldwell UNC Health Care. Prior experience in home healthcare is also beneficial for case managers, as is having helped patients through major illnesses, and then transitioned them back to work or home.

I want to talk about the qualities of a successful case manager. You want to have an independent thinker because you’re going to be doing a lot on your own. You’re in a practice by yourself. It’s the way we’re set up, but of course, we call each other if we have a question.

You want self-motivation for the same reasons, because you want somebody that is going to be motivated to help the patients and be able to think outside the box.

You need a strong skill set. I’ve found that a good home health background or experience in community nursing helps the case manager determine what a patient might need, because you’ve seen that in the community.

We have several home health nurses at work for us. We have a hospice nurse that works for us and a nurse that worked with insurance claims and worker’s comp. They all have some background where they’ve helped people get through an illness and transition either back to work or get back to where they were before their illness.

Of course, you want a confident nurse, and you need somebody that has the great passion for helping people and is strong willed. You want to take care of the patients, so you’re not popular all the time with the providers. We’re really an advocate for our patients. We’re not always telling them what they want to hear.

If providers don’t have room on their schedule, sometimes we’re really begging for them to see a patient. You have to have good communication skills, be determined to take care of the patients because that is our goal as they transition back to their home or from the facilities. As you know, the personalities are strong in our field of nursing. With the providers, we are in a position sometimes to be a little forceful.

Source: Embedded Case Management in Primary Care and Work Sites: Referral, Stratification and Protocols (Webinar available for replay)

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Embedded-Case-Management-in-Primary-Care-and-Work-Sites-Referral-Stratification-and-Protocols-a-45-minute-webinar-on-September-25-2014-now-available-for-replay_p_4955.html

Embedded Case Management in Primary Care and Work Sites: Referral, Stratification and Protocols presents Melanie Fox, director of the Caldwell Physician Network Embedded Case Management program at Caldwell UNC Health Care, as she shares how embedded case managers in both primary care practices and work sites are improving the quality of care and reducing healthcare costs by increasing preventive care measures at the work sites and improving care gaps for patients managed by the primary care practice.

Infographic: The Critical Value of Nursing in Healthcare

July 4th, 2014 by Jackie Lyons

Nurses make up the majority of labor in the healthcare industry, and 581,500 more nursing jobs are expected by 2018 due to aging baby boomers in need of outpatient and in-home care, according to a new infographic from Career Glider.

This infographic also identifies top growing healthcare jobs, specific reasons for growth and the preferred education levels of these professionals.

Want to know more about the occupation of nursing? Health Care System Transformation for Nursing and Health Care Leaders: Implementing a Culture of Caring reflects the interests of such major stakeholders as patients and families, nurses, physicians and other primary and adjunctive care providers, ancillary service providers, administrators and managers, and all other individuals involved in the many aspects of organizational models and delivery of healthcare and human resource functions and outcomes.

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Infographic: Average Day in the Life of Nursing

June 13th, 2014 by Jackie Lyons

There are currently 2.6 million registered nurses in the United States, according to a new infographic from Jacksonville University School of Nursing. The demand for highly qualified nurses is evident by the increased pay for nurses with advanced degrees.

This infographic outlines an average day in the life of a nurse, including number of patients seen, duties performed and more.

Want to delve deeper into the occupation of nursing? Health Care System Transformation for Nursing and Health Care Leaders: Implementing a Culture of Caring reflects the interests of such major stakeholders as patients and families, nurses, physicians and other primary and adjunctive care providers, ancillary service providers, administrators and managers, and all other individuals involved in the many aspects of organizational models and delivery of healthcare and human resource functions and outcomes.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

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Infographic: The Quality of Nursing, Patient Care

April 16th, 2014 by Jackie Lyons

Seventy-five percent of Americans 30 years and older are more concerned with the quality of nursing staff in hospitals than with the availability or accessibility of electronic medical records (EMRs), according to a new infographic form API Healthcare.

While confident in nursing abilities, a majority of consumers feel nurses are spread too thin, which is impacting the quality of patient care. This infographic also provides data on the quality of nursing care, impacts of the Affordable Care Act (ACA), consumer concerns and quality of patient care.

Looking for other ways to increase patient satisfaction? You may also be interested in The Patient-Centered Payoff: Driving Practice Growth Through Image, Culture, and Patient Experience, which is filled with easy-to-implement ideas. This 260-page resource describes how the patient-centered movement has changed medical practice and offer insights into the opportunities this new environment provides to practices.

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Infographic: Technology Poised to Change Future of Nursing

April 4th, 2014 by Jackie Lyons

Healthcare reform is not the only change that will affect the nursing profession, evolving technology is likely to alter the future of nursing as well.

Among emerging healthcare technologies is barcode medication administration, which allows medications to be scanned before being administered. This enables nurses to check that the medication is correct, for the right patient and in the right dosage, according to a new infographic from Norwich University Online.

This infographic outlines other technologies that will change the nursing industry in years ahead, as well as how healthcare reform and education will affect the nursing profession.

Looking for other ways to increase medication adherence? You may also be interested in 2013 Healthcare Benchmarks: Improving Medication Adherence. This 56-page resource provides actionable information from more than 100 healthcare organizations on efforts to improve medication adherence and compliance in their populations.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Job Satisfaction for Nurses Helps Enhance Patient Outcomes

November 20th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

When nurses enjoy their jobs and intend to stay in their positions long-term, patient outcomes improve, according to the American Nurses Association (ANA).

As a result, infection rate decreased by 87 percent in two years, according to a new infographic from ANA. The infographic shows additional ways patients benefit from having satisfied nurses, as well as other trends in the nursing profession.

Job Satisfaction for Nurses Helps Enhance Patient Outcomes

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

You may also be interested in this related resource: Health Care System Transformation for Nursing and Health Care Leaders: Implementing a Culture of Caring.

Infographic: Dissecting Patient-Centered Care

July 24th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

Patient-centered care is evolving, and healthcare providers are redirecting their focus to meet the unique needs of every patient.

Beginning this year, 30 percent of hospital Medicare reimbursements will be determined based on patient experience, according to a new infographic from the University of Arizona College of Nursing. This infographic also details healthcare reform’s effect on nursing professions, the need for advanced nursing education, chronic illness in the United States, switching from disease-centered to patient-centered care, and more.

Dissecting Patient-Centered Care

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

You may also be interested in this related resource: Improving Patient Care: The Implementation of Change in Health Care, 2nd Edition.

Meet Nurse Health Coach Elizabeth Scala: Helping RNs Avoid Burnout, Achieve Balance

May 10th, 2013 by Cheryl Miller

This month’s inside look at a health coach, the choices she made on the road to success, and the challenges ahead.

Elizabeth Scala, MSN, MBA, RN, professional nurse coach, and founder of Living Sublime Wellness.

HIN: What was your first job out of college and how did you get into health coaching?

(Elizabeth Scala) My first job out of college was as a psychiatric nurse at the Johns Hopkins Hospital on a general adult inpatient unit. I got into coaching because the way I was living my life while I worked as a nurse was completely unhealthy. I had no spiritual life; my mental/emotional health was a roller coaster ride; my physical health was in the toilet. So I took a huge risk — against my parents’ wishes — and left that job to take care of me. I went to work at a wellness center, running their physician referral exercise program. At the gym, I was surrounded by exercise, nutrition, and people who could help me. I realized (and remembered) that I enjoyed being and living healthy! So I got into a health coaching training program so that I could do more at the club. That led to me loving it and deciding to open up my own practice so that I could help more nurses like me — who had lost their love of life and their passion for their career.

Have you received any health coaching certifications? If so, please list these certifications.

I went through the Wellcoaches certified health and wellness coaching training program.

Has there been a defining moment in your career? Perhaps when you knew you were on the right road?

Not yet. I know this is what I want to do, but I still have fears and doubts (as any human being would and does). I still work part-time at Johns Hopkins, as my coaching business doesn’t fully support me, but I have faith and optimism (and hard work, dedication, passion, commitment, and self-care practices) that sustain me and help me to know that I am meant to do this work!

In brief, describe your organization.

My company is called Living Sublime Wellness. I use a variety of modalities with my work. As a nurse, health coach, and Reiki Master, I primarily work with nurses and healthcare professionals who are looking to make and sustain healthy lifestyles. I also host a bi-weekly radio show that is available via my iTunes channel and the Blog Talk Radio archive page. I put on monthly wellness workshops via interactive webinar, which vary each month in topic to speak to my belief that well-being is holistic. I love doing in-person talks on the essential steps to well being for nursing associations, nurse conferences, nurse departments, and anything/anybody nursing! I run small group coaching programs and work with clients one-on-one. And I tie Reiki into it all. I use distance Reiki with my coaching clients; participate in Reiki sharing and clinics; work on Reiki research at my hospital job; give Reiki treatments; and teach Reiki to groups.

What are two or three important concepts or rules that you follow in health coaching?

I don’t tell people what to do. It is my core belief that the answers, the healing, the help is all within us. We just need to take and make the time to listen and get to know ourselves. As a coach, I help people get the inside stuff out and allow them to really hear themselves. Then together we find the answers, ideas, and tools that work for them!

My second belief is that health is holistic. If I am eating well, but hating my job, am I healthy? If I work out all day but then go eat take-out and binge drink all night, am I healthy? No! There are many, many aspects that go into total well-being: in addition to the obvious three (physical, nutritional, and mental/emotional). We’ve got career, social, spiritual, environmental aspects to consider. Wellness is a total lifestyle. We can’t fix ourselves overnight with a quick pill. It is a lifestyle that takes time, support, and a broad scope. I work with clients on living healthy in all aspects of their lives.

What is the single-most successful thing that your company is doing now?

My RejuveNation Collaboration. It is a two-week, 14-speaker, and 14-topic video event. It is a virtual conference that offers a balanced dose of self-care. This event brings unique and diverse experts together from across the country. We have interactive and experiential workshops that the registrants actually participate in. We share a series workbook with reflective exercises; a secret social networking group for interaction with speakers and each other before, during and after the event; and so much more! This time around we added daily mini-meditation breaks and healthy samples of chocolate for participants to take time for themselves and enjoy peace and chocolate meditations. I absolutely love this event. The speakers have a great time getting to know me and each other. And since I do this twice a year, the speakers become a part of the family. We have a ton of fun and each time we do something different to change it up and take it up a notch! In the past this event was targeted at nurses, but we have future visions of expanding our audience and engaging on a larger level.

What is the single most effective workflow, process, tool or form that you are using in coaching today?

Using Reiki as a tool for everything I do. I have seen clients have amazing shifts, just from using distance Reiki in our one-on-one coaching sessions. It helps them to calm down, quiet that extra mental chatter, and really hear themselves so that amazing shifts can occur. Change happens and growth occurs. But I not only bring my Reiki into my coaching calls, I use it in all that I do. I bring my Reiki to my own goals, my health and well-being, and my nurse associations. It is a simple, but wonderful tool.

What is the most satisfying thing about being a health coach?

I love seeing other people figure things out for themselves. Being in healthcare for this long, this model doesn’t work. A provider tells a patient or prescribes a treatment and more often than not the patient never does it. Why? We are adults… we like making our own choices. We think for ourselves. Quite frankly, we don’t like being told what to do. So as a coach it is awesome to partner with folks so that they choose help, but of course with my gentle nudge. It is then so satisfying to hear back from them about what worked, how they have improved, and maintain it in a lifestyle.

What is the greatest challenge of health coaching, and how are you working to overcome this challenge?

Being patient. Sometimes I want things to go quicker than they are happening. I just have to relax, let go, breathe, and use some of my own spiritual practices and self-care techniques to remind myself to stay in the moment. It is challenging at times, but so rewarding when possible.

Where did you grow up?

Carmel, N.Y.

What college did you attend? Is there a moment from that time that stands out?

For undergraduate, the University of Delaware. For graduate school, Johns Hopkins University.

Are you married? Do you have children?

Yes, no children, but two dogs.

What is your favorite hobby and how did it develop in your life?

Yoga. I love how strong, yet calm I feel afterwards. I love relaxing and breathing and being with myself and my body. I feel very balanced and I need that sense of balance. So even though I enjoy other exercises that may make me sweat more and have my heart beating fast, I love yoga for the hard work yet gentle softness it creates for me.

Is there a book you recently read or movie you saw that you would recommend?

I loved Pamela Miles’ book Reiki: A Comprehensive Guide. I also recently enjoyed the Living Yoga book. I always, always recommend Jon Kabat-Zinn’s books, especially Full Catastrophe Living.

Meet Health Coach Mary Jo Clarkson: Helping Pregnant, High-Risk Women on Path to Optimum Wellness

July 6th, 2012 by Cheryl Miller

This month’s inside look at a health coach, the choices she made on the road to success, and the challenges ahead.

Mary Jo Clarkson, RN, BSN, CHC, specializing in pre-conceptual health and wellness for FEMTIQUE, Associates, Inc.

HIN: What was your first job out of college and how did you get into health coaching?

Mary Jo Clarkson: My first job out of college was as a new staff GN (graduate nurse) on a surgical floor in a Wilmington, DE hospital. Since that time, I specialized in OB/GYN nursing, in staff, management and case management positions. I have also taught prenatal classes, and was involved in the corporate world for nine years, in the pharmaceutical industry.

My friend and colleague of several years, Judith Beaulieu, was starting a new company called FEMTIQUE. She wanted me to be a part of it, and to become a certified health coach along with her. My experience in the corporate world helped me to develop and manage business skills within a professional health coaching practice, with a focus on coaching women experiencing high-risk pregnancies.

Have you received any health coaching certifications? If so, please list these certifications.

I am a CHC (certified health coach) from HCA. I am also a member of the Association for Women’s Health, Obstetric, and Neonatal Nursing (AWHONN), and am currently pursuing certification as a breastfeeding counseling coach through the Academy of Lactation Policy and Practice (ALPP).

Has there been a defining moment in your career? Perhaps when you knew you were on the right road?

I always felt a ‘calling’ to help women who were trying to become pregnant or already pregnant. So when Judy came to me with her business plan, I immediately knew that was a way I would be able to help the most women.

In brief, describe your organization.

FEMTIQUE Associates, Inc. is a non-profit healthcare advocate and health coach organization providing health and wellness care information and resources for women and children, so they can attain better outcomes in their lives and maintain an optimum level of wellness.

What are two or three important concepts or rules that you follow in health coaching?

  • Complete confidentiality, with all clients.
  • The client determines his/her long-term goals and we guide them through the steps to achieve their goals.
  • We are NOT always successful in achieving all of our clients’ goals.
  • Do you see a trend or path that you have to lock onto for 2012?

    The trend is towards more community-based healthcare services.

    What is the most satisfying thing about being a health coach?

    When you see the client become empowered, because they have taken all the necessary steps to achieve their optimum level of wellness and they are accomplishing their goals.

    What is the greatest challenge of health coaching, and how are you working to overcome this challenge?

    When clients’ road blocks stop them from achieving their goals. As health coaches, we help our clients work through these road blocks by showing them more paths around and through them.

    What is the single most effective workflow, process, tool or form that you are using in coaching today?

    We utilize M.A.S.T.E.R. goal planning software. It is very successful right now.

    Where did you grow up?

    In Springfield, PA.

    What college did you attend? Is there a moment from that time that stands out?

    St. Joseph’s University and Neumann University.

    Are you married? Do you have children?

    I am married and have one child.

    What is your favorite hobby and how did it develop in your life?

    Cooking and sewing are my favorite hobbies – they both developed in my childhood from watching my Italian grandmother cook for hours with pleasure, and sewing many dresses, with just a few measurements and creating something beautiful.

    Is there a book you recently read or movie you saw that you would recommend?

    Come Home by Lisa Scottoline.