Posts Tagged ‘LACE readmissions tool’

SNF Visits to High-Risk Patients Break Down Barriers to Care Transitions

September 21st, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

For patients recently discharged from the hospital, a SNF visit covers the same ground as a home visit: medications, health status, preparing for physician conversations and care planning.

The care transitions intervention developed by the Council on Aging (COA) of Southwestern Ohio for high-risk patients starts off in the hospital with a visit by an embedded coach, and includes a home visit.

Additionally, to reduce the likelihood of a readmission, patients discharged to a skilled nursing facility (SNF) also can expect a COA field coach to stop by within 10 days of SNF admission. Here, Danielle Amrine, transitional care business manager for the COA of Southwestern Ohio, describes the typical SNF visit and her organization’s innovative solution for staffing these visits.

We conduct the home visit within 24 to 72 hours. We go over medication management, the personal health record (PHR), and follow-up with specialists and red flags. At the SNF, we do the same things with those patients, but in regards to the nursing facility: specifically, do you know what medications you’re taking? Do you know how to find out that information, especially for family members and caregivers? Do you know the status of your loved one’s care at this point? Do you know the right person to speak to about any concerns or issues?

We also ask the patients to define their goals for their SNF stay. What are your therapy goals? What discharge planning do you need? We set our SNF visit within 10 calendar days, because normally within three days, they’ve just gotten there. They’re not settled. There haven’t been any care conferences yet. We set the visit at 10 calendar days to make sure that everything is on track, to see if this person is going to stay at the SNF long-term. Our goal is to have them transition out. We provide them with all of the support, resources and program information to help them transition from the nursing facility back to independent living.

For our nursing facility visits, we also utilize the LACE readmissions tool (an index based on Length of stay, Acute admission through the emergency department (ED), Comorbidities and Emergency department visits in the past six months) to see if that person would need a visit post-discharge.

For our CMS contract, we are paid for only one visit. Generally we’re only paid for the visit we complete in the nursing home, but through our intern pilot, our interns do that second visit to the home once the patient is discharged from the nursing home. We don’t pay for our interns, and we don’t get paid for the visit. We thought that was a perfect match to impact these patients who may have a hard time transitioning from the nursing facility to home.

Source: Post-Discharge Home Visits: 5 Pillars to Reduce Readmissions and Engage High-Risk Patients

home visits

In Post-Discharge Home Visits: 5 Pillars to Reduce Readmissions and Engage High-Risk Patients, Danielle Amrine, transitional care business manager at the Council on Aging (COA) of Southwestern Ohio, describes her organization’s home visit intervention, which is designed to encourage and empower patients of any age and their caregivers to assert a more active role during their care transition and avoid breakdowns in post-discharge care.

Community Health Network Retools Readmissions Ruler for High-Risk Heart Failure Patients

September 9th, 2014 by Patricia Donovan

From the many evidence-based health risk stratification tools available, Community Health Network has adapted a popular hospital readmissions indicator for use with medically complex patients at high risk of readmissions. Deborah Lyons, MSN, RN,NE-BC, network disease management executive director for Community Health Network, describes the adaptation process.

HIN: Where do home visits for heart failure patients enter the picture?

Deborah Lyons: We do a high-risk home assessment while we have patients in the hospital. Fully 100 percent of our patients that are admitted to inpatient status are automatically screened and ranked in terms of readmission risk. That’s where we use the LACE/ACE tool. We embedded that tool in our software so it can predictively tell us which patients to focus on.

HIN: How did you decide on the LACE tool? Is the ACE tool different than the LACE tool?

Deborah Lyons: The LACE itself is evidence-based. We work with the advisory board. And they had just done an analysis of all the predictive models out there in terms of readmission risk when we started this work. There were only two tools that were moderately predictive for risk. LACE was one of them. LACE looks at length of stay (L), acute admission (A), (meaning they came in through the emergency room), their Charleston Comorbidity score (C) and the number of ED visits (E) they’ve had in the past six months.

All this information was easily available to us at the time that we did this because we were on a different computer system. But the concern was that the L factor (length of stay), might lead us to place the patient at high risk when they were leaving the hospital. Maybe they started at low risk and then on the fourth day of stay, because they had been there four days, now they moved to high risk but they’re being discharged. You really can’t do anything at day of discharge. We first set a threshold for LACE, which we tested and validated and then ran a correlation and asked ourselves, “If this threshold is a LACE high risk, what would a correlating threshold be if we dropped the length of stay?” That’s how we moved to an ACE score.

Source: Stratifying High-Risk, High-Cost Patients: Benchmarks, Predictive Algorithms and Data Analytics

Stratifying High-Risk Patients


Stratifying High-Risk, High-Cost Patients: Benchmarks, Predictive Algorithms and Data Analytics
Reviews a range of risk stratification practices to determine candidates for health coaching, case management, home visits, remote monitoring and other initiatives designed to engage individuals with chronic illness, improve health outcomes and reduce healthcare spend.