Posts Tagged ‘IRF’

Post-Acute Care Improvement: 9 Trends to Know

August 25th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

post-acute care trends

Healthcare favors a unified cross-setting PAC payment system, according to 2015 PAC metrics from the Healthcare Intelligence Network.


Across the continuum of post-acute care (PAC) providers—defined as skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), home health agencies (HHAs), inpatient rehabilitation facilities (IRFs), and long-term care hospitals (LTCHs)—skilled nursing is the sector most in need of reform, say 40 percent of healthcare organizations who responded to a 2015 survey on Post-Acute Care Trends.

Also in need of revamping are PAC payment models, the Healthcare Intelligence Network survey determined. While 53 percent have already incorporated PAC services into value-based reimbursement methodologies such as an accountable care organization (ACO) or shared savings arrangement, 60 percent of respondents would like to see Medicare adopt a unified cross-setting PAC payment system that would follow the patient across care sites.

Already participating in Models 2 and 3 of CMS’s ongoing Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) initiative, PAC providers are also gearing up for closer scrutiny of skilled nursing facility (SNF) readmission rates by Medicare beginning in 2018. The federal payor has been monitoring 30-day hospital readmission rates since 2012, gradually expanding the list of applicable readmissions measures and scaling readmission reimbursement.

The top tactics to improve quality, enhance care coordination and reduce spend associated with post-acute care include care transition management, development of PAC partnerships and integration of all PAC services, say respondents.

Here are five more metrics from HIN’s 2015 Post-Acute Care Trends survey:

  • A case manager helms PAC improvement initiatives for 38 percent of respondents.
  • Patient transitions between care sites is the top PAC challenge, say 25 percent of respondents.
  • Half of responding organizations say heart failure and shock are the most challenging health conditions to manage in PAC settings.
  • Eighty-five percent of respondents said care coordination improved as a result of these efforts, while 36 percent observed a decline in hospital readmissions from PAC facilities.
  • The INTERACT™ (Interventions to Reduce Acute-Care Transfers) program and tools, designed to reduce the frequency of PAC transfers to acute hospitals, are frequently cited by respondents as critical to PAC coordination. The INTERACT tool was initially developed by Joseph G. Ouslander, MD and Mary Perloe, MS, GNP, at the Georgia Medical Care Foundation.

The post-acute care arena is rich with opportunity for improvement, agreed many respondents.

“PAC is the blockbuster drug the U.S. healthcare system has been waiting for,” concluded one survey respondent, noting that post-acute care provides big financial levers for provider organizations to align clinically, financially and operationally. “Forward-thinking providers are organizing to amass large pools of manageable risk and recalibrating to optimize care delivery and share meaningfully in the medical expense reduction associated with better more effective and patient centric care. This is a win all the way around.”

Download an executive summary of 2015 PAC survey results.