Posts Tagged ‘improving patient care’

Infographic: Patient Matching Errors

July 21st, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Mistaken identities and unmatched patient healthcare records can have serious consequences, according to a new infographic by The Pew Charitable Trusts.

The infographic looks at common patient matching problems and the impact on healthcare quality and costs.

The Science of Successful Care Transition Management: Leveraging Home Visits to Improve Readmissions and ROIA care transitions management program operated by Sun Health since 2011 has significantly reduced hospital readmissions for nearly 12,000 Medicare patients, resulting in $14.8 million in savings to the Medicare program.

Using home visits as a core strategy, the Sun Health Care Transitions program was a top performer in CMS’s recently concluded Community-Based Care Transitions (CBCT) demonstration project, which was launched in 2012 to explore new solutions for reducing hospital readmissions, improving quality and achieving measurable savings for Medicare.

The Science of Successful Care Transition Management: Leveraging Home Visits to Improve Readmissions and ROI explores the critical five pillars of the Arizona non-profit’s leading care transitions management initiative, adapted from the Coleman Care Transitions Intervention®.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Building a High-Acuity Patient Care Model

June 8th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

At the core of high-acuity patient care model is a multidisciplinary clinical care team supporting the patient with a mix of in-office and in-home care, according to a new infographic by Oliver Wyman.

The infographic illustrates the links in a high-acuity patient care model that together can more fully address the needs of the elderly Medicare Advantage (MA) population and the chronically ill.

Physician Reimbursement for Chronic Care Management: Identifying New Practice Revenue OpportunitiesStarting this past January, Medicare is reimbursing physician practices for select Chronic Care Management (CCM) services not previously eligible for reimbursement, underscoring the vital role of care management in primary care.

Physician Reimbursement for Chronic Care Management: Identifying New Practice Revenue Opportunities offers practical guidance to prepare physician practices to maximize CCM reimbursement in the year ahead.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

13 Metrics on Care Transition Management

May 7th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

Care transitions mandate: Sharpen communication between care sites.


Call it Care Transitions Management 2.0 — enterprising approaches that range from recording patient discharge instructions to enlisting fire departments and pharmacists to conduct home visits and reconcile medications.

To improve 30-day readmissions and avoid costly Medicare penalties, more than one-third of 116 respondents to the 2015 Care Transitions Management survey—34 percent—have designed programs in this area, drawing inspiration from the Coleman Care Transitions Program®, Project BOOST®, Project RED, Guided Care®, and other models.

Whether self-styled or off the shelf, well-managed care transitions enhance both quality of care and utilization metrics, according to this fourth annual Care Transitions survey conducted in February 2015 by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Seventy-four percent of respondents reported a drop in readmissions; 44 percent saw decreases in lengths of stay; 38 percent saw readmissions penalties drop; and 65 percent said patient compliance improved.

Following are eight more care transition management metrics derived from the survey:

  • The hospital-to-home transition is the most critical transition to manage, say 50 percent of respondents.
  • Heart failure is the top targeted health condition of care transition efforts for 81 percent of respondents.
  • A history of recent hospitalizations is the most glaring indicator of a need for care transitions management, say 81 percent of respondents.
  • Beyond the self-developed approach, the most-modeled program is CMS’ Community-Based Care Transitions Program, say 13 percent of respondents.
  • Eighty percent of respondents engage patients post-discharge via telephonic follow-up.
  • Discharge summary templates are used by 45 percent of respondents.
  • Home visits for recently discharged patients are offered by 49 percent of respondents.
  • Beyond the EHR, information about discharged or transitioning patients is most often transmitted via phone or fax, say 38 percent of respondents.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management

Care Transition Management

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management HIN’s fourth annual analysis of these cross-continuum initiatives, examines programs, models, protocols and results associated with movement of patients from one care site to another, including the impact of care transitions management on quality metrics and the delivery of value-based care.

Infographic: What Medical Innovations Will Transform Healthcare in 2015?

December 8th, 2014 by Melanie Matthews

What medical innovations have the potential to improve patient care in 2015 and beyond?

The following infographic produced by HIT Consultants illustrates the Cleveland Clinic’s annual top 10 medical innovations that are likely to have a major impact on improving patient care in 2015.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2015: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare IndustryFrom collaboration and consolidation to the inevitable acceptance of a value-based system, the state of healthcare continues to stimulate health plans, providers and employers.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2015: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN’s eleventh annual industry forecast, examines the factors challenging healthcare players and suggests strategies for organizations to distinguish themselves in the steadily evolving marketplace.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

New Rule for Patient Care Collaborations: There’s No ‘I’ in ‘Team’

March 6th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

“Take your provider hat off and put on your patient hat for a moment. Do you feel as though you’re at the center of your own healthcare team, or that your mother or child has a healthcare team around them? Do you even feel as though there is a healthcare team?” asks Teresa M. Treiger, RN-BC, MA, CHCQM-CM/TOC, CCM, CCP, president of Ascent Care Management. Here, she lists the elements necessary to build an effective patient care team.

I always use the phrase, “There is no ‘I’ in the word ‘team,’” and it’s really true. True teams are precious; high functioning teams are a real rarity. I know there are organizations that deliver excellent team-based collaborative care, but it’s not a common occurrence because the concepts of teamwork are not necessarily covered in everyone’s curriculum or training. Nurses, social workers and allied health all come up within the perspective of being part of a team, but that is not codified into the curriculum at every institution.

Then we have to consider the patient. Supposedly the patient is at the center of the care team, but right now the center, I think, is a convenient place for the patient to be because then everyone can get their hands on them, so to speak. However, the patients that I speak to across the country are not feeling the love. They’re not feeling like they’re at the center of anything.

To demonstrate this, take your provider hat off and put your patient hat on for a moment. You’re all patients at some level, or your loved ones are. Do you feel as though you’re at the center of your own healthcare team, or that your mother or your child has a healthcare team around them? Do you even feel as though there is a healthcare team? If you can shift your perspective there, you can see where patients are not feeling that love necessarily.

Team building takes a tremendous amount of the time. It takes collaboration, it takes everyone at the table being accountable, and it takes everyone at the table being able to trust the other people sitting across from them. It’s not something that you can just decide to have — “Well, let’s have a great team.” It takes time. If anyone has worked in an emergency room, when you have a group of people working together on a shift that just clicks, when you know you can count on those people, that’s the kind of energy and positive interchange that I’m talking about when I talk about teams. That takes time; it didn’t just happen on day one. Trust is something that builds over time; similar to the interest on your bank account.

Excerpted from Case Management in Value-Based Healthcare: Trends, Team-Building and Technology.

Early Palliative Care Improves Patient Care, Reduces Hospitalizations

January 15th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

The word palliative literally means to cloak or conceal, and is used to describe care designed to alleviate the extreme pain and suffering of those with chronic or terminal illnesses.

It’s an ironic name for a subject many medical professionals would prefer be concealed. There’s a shortfall of as many as 18,000 board certified physicians focused on palliative care and hospice care in the United States. There are 5,150 hospice programs and 1,635 hospital palliative care teams in the United States, which means there’s only one specialist for every 20,000 older adults living with a severe chronic illness, according to the American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine.

Certification roadblocks and lower salaries account for part of this shortage; but, it could also be chalked up to discomfort with the subject. According to a study from Massachusetts General Hospital, which surveyed over 4,000 physicians caring for cancer patients, researchers found that while the vast majority of them said they would personally enroll in a hospice program if they received a terminal cancer diagnosis, less than one-third said they would discuss hospice options with their cancer patients early in their diagnosis.

But new research, including the results to our current 10 question survey on palliative care, is showing that palliative care programs are increasing, and can improve the patient experience and help avoid costly hospitalizations. New York University College of Nursing researchers and colleagues reporting in the Journal of Palliative Medicine found that initiating a palliative care consult in the emergency department (ED) reduced hospital length-of-stay (LOS) by 3.6 days when compared to patients who received the palliative care consult after admission. The ED is a setting for triage, treatment, and determining the sick patient’s subsequent course of care, which in this case includes a dedicated palliative care unit.

“By providing early palliative care, patient needs are met earlier on, either preventing admission or reducing length of stay and treatment intensity for patients, which reduces costs to Medicare and the government,” says New York University College of Nursing researcher and Assistant Professor Abraham A. Brody, RN, PhD, GNP-BC. “Patients receiving palliative care are less likely to be readmitted as well. Early palliative care can better help patients to have their wishes met, and allow them to return to and stay at home.”

Helping people decide how they want to spend the rest of their lives, and granting their wishes might be the most important palliative care treatment of all. NPR reports on Dr. Tim Ihrig of Trinity Regional Medical Center in Fort Dodge, Iowa, who makes house calls to his patients nearing their end of life. “What are the three most important things to you,” he asks his patient, an 86 year-old wife, mother, grandmother, and great grandmother with congestive heart failure. She answers: “My girls, playing cards once a week, and counting money for the church once a month,” and he helps her to achieve that. Patients in palliative care at Trinity Regional Medical Center cost the healthcare system 70 percent less than other patients with similar diagnoses, hospital officials say.

And palliative care isn’t going away, in fact, it’s spurred a new HBO comedy series, Getting On. Taking place in an extended care facility, the short-staffed ward tries their best to tend to their patients — some of whom have Alzheimer’s disease, but most of whom are simply old &#151 while hoping they don’t lose their Medicare reimbursement. The series makes jokes about everything from displaced fecal matter to sex, attempting to make fun out of a subject that’s been cloaked, or concealed, for a long time. Whether the series is renewed remains to be seen, but at the very least it’s provided a look at the kindness a group of workers can give their patients nearing the end of their life.