Posts Tagged ‘high-cost patients’

Physician Supplemental QRUR: Episode-Specific Patient-Level Data Tells Story of High Utilizers

February 7th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

QRUR reports provide a mirror into physicians’ cost and quality performance under MACRA.

As year one of MACRA unfolds, healthcare providers deterred by security hurdles associated with CMS Enterprise Portal access may want to reconsider. The wealth of aggregate quality and cost performance data available through the portal is well worth the trouble of accessing it, advises William Holding, consultant with PDA, Inc.

Specifically, Quality Resource and Utilization Reports (QRURs) downloadable from the portal are essential tools for physician practices that hope to succeed on MACRA-defined reimbursement paths, Holding said—even practices equipped with robust internal reporting systems.

“This is the same system that accountable care organizations (ACOs) use, and that CMS uses for many other things, so it’s a good idea to get past those barriers,” he explained during Physician MACRA Preparation: Using QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize Your Performance, a February 2017 webinar now available for replay.

Originally designed for CMS’s value-based modifier, QRURs are good indicators of future cost performance under MACRA, via either Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), where most physician practices are expected to fall initially, or Alternate Payment Models (APMs), he said.

After providing an overview of MIPS and APMs, including five essential prerequisites to MACRA preparation, Holding delved into the quality and cost metrics contained in QRURs, from aggregate data in the main report to detailed tables rich with patient-specific information.

The main QRUR report illustrates where a physician practice falls in relation to other practices on the overall composite for cost and quality. The QRUR’s Quality portion shows scores for a series of domains, including effective clinical care and patient experience, which offer a great window into how a practice might perform with different selected measures in MIPS.

Next, QRUR cost performance indicates per capita costs for attributed beneficiaries, which will remain a cost measure in MIPS.

Drilling down, Holding characterized seven associated QRUR downloads—including one table on individual eligible professional performance on the 2015 PQRS Measures—as even more useful than the QRURs themselves.

And finally, he termed the downloadable supplemental QRUR “a very powerful tool” that drills down to the beneficiary level, providing a snapshot of some of the highest cost events occurring among a practice’s patients.

“For high utilizers, for specific episodes, you can drill right down to the patient to try and understand the story. What’s happening to your patient when they’re not in your practice, and what can you do about it?” said Holding.

Having presented the available reports, Holding described four key benefits of using QRUR downloads, including as a priority setting tool, and then detailed the myriad of ways QRURs can be analyzed to improve MIPS performance.

However, Holding stressed, even physician practices with the most sophisticated reporting structures will not thrive under MACRA without the right team or culture of provider support in place. He closed his presentation with a formula for determining investment in performance improvement activities and a five-step plan for MACRA preparation.

Listen to an interview with William Holding on the use of QRURs to determine a physician practice’s highest value referral pathways.

Infographic: 7 Critical Steps in Caring for High-Need, High-Cost Patients

November 13th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Patients with multiple health problems, often referred to as high-need, high-cost patients, often need assistance with areas outside of the typical medical environment, such as housing and everyday tasks in managing their health, according to a new infographic by The Commonwealth Fund.

The infographic looks at seven key features of programs that are effective in managing these patients.

7 Critical Steps in Caring for High-Need, High-Cost Patients

Asked by its C-suite to quantify contributions of its multidisciplinary care team for its highest-risk patients, AltaMed Health Services Corporation readily identified seven key performance metrics associated with the team. Having demonstrated the team’s bottom line impact on specialty costs, emergency room visits, and HEDIS® measures, among other areas, the largest independent federally qualified community health center (FQHC) was granted additional staff to expand care management for its safety net population.

Care Coordination of Highest-Risk Patients: Business Case for Managing Complex Populations chronicles AltaMed’s four-phase rollout of care coordination for dual eligibles—a population with higher hospitalization and utilization and care costs twice those of any other population served by AltaMed.

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4 Ways to Pinpoint High-Risk, High-Cost Candidates for Case Management

June 24th, 2014 by Patricia Donovan

case management patients

Doctors don't always know when their patients are in the hospital.

Providers in a physician practice are a good starting point for case managers to identify high-risk or high-cost patients for case management, explains Annette Watson, RN-BC, CCM, MBA, senior VP of community transformation for Taconic Professional Resources (TPR).

The process of identifying high-risk, high-cost patients can be formal or informal. You can use internal sources; when TPR goes in, that is one of the baselines of understanding. We understand who the patients are and what the population is, because if they have not been using data or have not been in an Advanced Primary Care initiative, it is highly unlikely the practice will have a quantitative method in place when we arrive.

We begin by asking the practice providers who the sickest patients are. Second, we can use data available at the practice level, such as registries or reports that can be run from the EHR.

Third, we also look at the kind of data they get from external sources. For example, do they receive reports from payors that show some utilization activity? Many of those reports may be somewhat aged. They are not necessarily timely, which raises actionability questions. However, we found there are reports coming out from payors, particularly about recent ER use or hospital discharges, that are more timely, which allow the practices to look at data—still retrospectively in most cases but much more quickly than they were able to in the past.

And finally, hospital admission and discharge information is important. Depending on the model in a PCP, if a physician is not the admitting physician— that is, if the admission is from a specialist, hospitalist, or through the ER—it cannot be assumed the PCP has the admission and discharge information.

People may think physicians know about their patients being in the hospital, but that is not always the case.

(Note: Taconic Professional Resources offers professional training and practice optimization to organizations aspiring to become a patient-centered medical home and/or join a medical neighborhood.)

Excerpted from: Advancing Primary Care with Embedded Case Management: Lessons from the Taconic IPA Pilot