Posts Tagged ‘elderly’

Infographic: Healthy Aging

April 1st, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

By 2030, one out of every five people will be age 65 or over, according to the Massachusetts Healthy Aging Data Report by the Tufts Health Plan Foundation.

An infographic developed by Tufts examines key findings from the study, including details on factors driving health status in those over 65, the impact of racial disparities on health and community recommendations for healthy aging.

Comprehensive Care Coordination for Chronically Ill AdultsBreakthroughs in medical science and technology, combined with shifts in lifestyle and demographics, have resulted in a rapid rise in the number of individuals living with one or more chronic illnesses.

Comprehensive Care Coordination for Chronically Ill Adults presents thorough demographics on this growing sector, describes models for change, reviews current literature and examines various outcomes.

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Meet Deborah Vermillion: Home Care CEO Aims to Keep Seniors at Home as Long as Possible

March 13th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

Deborah Vermillion, RN, MSHCA, CSA, CDE, President/Owner of ComForcare Homecare, a non-medical home care business.

This month we provide an inside look at a healthcare case manager, the choices she made on the road to success and the challenges ahead.

HIN: Tell us a little about yourself and your credentials.

(Deborah Vermillion) I have been in the healthcare workforce for 36 years. I am a registered nurse. I have a master’s degree in health care administration. I am a certified senior advisor. I am also certified in diabetic education.

What was your first job out of college and how did you get into case management?

My first job out of college was in an intensive care unit (ICU)/coronary care unit (CCU) at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh as a staff nurse. After four years as a staff nurse and supervisor, I entered medical sales in the home care equipment and infusion industry. During that time it was very important to manage discharge planning as it related to the items we were providing. That was the beginning of my entry into case management.

Has there been a defining moment in your career? Perhaps when you knew you were on the right road?

I always knew that I wanted to be a nurse. My nursing education has led to continued growth and career development, and has been the springboard to all that I have achieved.

In brief, describe your organization.

I own a non-medical home care business. We provide activities of daily living (ADL) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) care to seniors in their homes. Our goal is to keep seniors at home for as long as possible. Because I am a nurse we also provide private duty nursing services. We will be expanding this product line through accreditation this year.

What are two or three important concepts or rules that you follow in case management?

  • Follow all cases through to completion.
  • Pay attention to all client details in order to avoid any unforeseen issues.
  • Understand that we are working in their environment, not an institutional environment. Adjust our approach to achieve the best results without being overly invasive.

What is the single most successful thing that your organization is doing now?

Because of our care for each of our clients we have been able to keep readmission rates to a minimum. When we last measured we were at five percent.

Do you see a trend or path that you have to lock onto for 2015?

We need to continue to pay attention to details. We have instituted a more robust quality management program that we hope will bring a stronger platform to our already complete care.

What is the most satisfying thing about being a case manager?

Being able to keep the client at home, aging in place up to their death.

What is the greatest challenge in case management and how are you working to overcome this challenge?

Communication between the various organizations that care for the client in the home. I constantly have to chase the Medicare agencies to ask for cross communication; most of the time they do not call back and obviously do not feel the importance in communicating to support continuity of care.

What is the single most effective workflow, process, tool or form you are using in case management today?

We have a Dementia Wise Training program that certifies our caregivers in dementia care. It is 8.5 hours of training. It has truly raised the bar of care for our clients with dementia, and it makes care much easier for caregivers as well.

Where did you grow up?

Pittsburgh, PA

What college did you attend? Is there a moment from that time that stands out?

University of Pittsburgh. Graduation day stands out. It was a very difficult five-year program and I was extremely proud and happy when I made it through.

Are you married? Do you have children?

I have been happily married for 28 years and I am the proud parent of two great sons — ages 24 and 27.
Yes and yes.

What is your favorite hobby and how did it develop in your life?

Snow skiing. I learned at the age of 22. I have improved every year and have become a relatively good intermediate skiier.

Is there a book you recently read or movie you saw that you would recommend?

American Sniper.

Do you have any additional comments about case management or the industry in general?

I believe that the case management industry needs to employ the very best. They need to be given full knowledge so that they can advise their clients of all their options as accurately as possible.

12 Things to Know About Chronic Care Management

February 24th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

Despite new CPT codes that reimburse physician practices for select chronic care management (CCM) services, almost half of healthcare organizations lack a formal CCM program, leaving critical reimbursement dollars on the table, according to 125 respondents to the Healthcare Intelligence Network’s (HIN) 2015 Chronic Care Management survey, conducted in January 2015.

However, 92 percent of respondents believe the Medicare CCM reimbursement codes that became effective January 1, 2015 will prompt equivalent quality overtures from private payors, underscoring care coordination’s importance in a value-based healthcare system.

We also asked respondents how they structured their CCM programs, and who had primary responsibility for CCM services. Following are their responses.

  • Almost 45 percent of respondents to HIN’s 2015 CCM survey have yet to launch a CCM initiative, the survey determined.
  • A diagnosis of diabetes is the leading criterion for admission to a CCM initiative, said 89 percent of respondents with existing CCM programs.
  • A primary care physician or healthcare case manager most often bears primary responsibility for CCM, say 29 percent of survey respondents.
  • Just over one-third of respondents — 35 percent — are currently reimbursed for CCM-related activities.
  • Patient engagement is the most difficult challenge of CCM, according to one-third of survey respondents.
  • The majority of CCM tasks are conducted telephonically, say 88 percent of respondents.
  • Almost three-quarters of respondents — 72 percent — admit patients with hypertension to CCM programs, respondents said.
  • Healthcare claims are the most frequently mined source of risk-stratification data for CCM, say 72 percent of respondents.
  • More than half of respondents — 51 percent — include palliative care or management of advanced illness in CCM programs.
  • On average, each CCM patient is seen monthly, say 29 percent of respondents.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Chronic Care Management

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/2015-Healthcare-Benchmarks-Chronic-Care-Management_p_5003.html

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Chronic Care Management captures tools, practices and lessons learned by the healthcare industry related to the management of chronic disease. This 40-page report, based on responses from 119 healthcare companies to HIN’s industry survey on chronic care management, assembles a wealth of metrics on eligibility requirements, reimbursement trends, promising protocols, challenges and ROI.

Value, Convenience Key to Successful Use of Telehealth Technology

May 8th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

The most sophisticated technology in the world will not engage patients and members in health improvement if they are not convinced of the value of the program to their health, the commitment of their providers to the process and the credibility of the entire care team says Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer for Pharos Innovations. Here, he discusses the importance of convenience when it comes to engaging members or patients into a daily self-care program.

AHRQ performed a technology assessment looking at the use of information technology (IT) and the adoption of IT by patients and members of health plans who were elderly and had chronic illness, or who were underserved and had chronic illness. This technology assessment focused on looking at interactive consumer technologies that were geared toward helping consumers improve their health. This assessment describes several factors that influence the use, usefulness and usability of these technologies, in particular in populations that we as a company and others would describe in their populations, which are the elderly or the underserved and who have chronic illness.

This review concludes that from a consumer’s perspective, programs and technologies that are used to support those programs need to have a perception of benefit to the individual who will be using them. Also, they have to be perceived as convenient and as something that can be easily integrated into the daily activities of that individual patient or member.

Ultimately, the successful use of these interactive technologies is predicated on engagement into the use of that program or technology. That is directly linked to the amount of value that the consumer might perceive about the intervention that’s being offered to them — that those technologies will have a positive impact on the health and wellness of those populations if indeed there’s a feedback loop that’s provided. This feedback loop is something that’s also crucial to the design of the engagement and ultimate intervention programs. The feedback loop may include an assessment of the current health status, interpretation of that status in light of established treatment plans and treatment goals, adjustments made to that treatment plan as needed and communication back to the patient or the member with targeted recommendations or advice. This cycle then repeats.

Lastly, this report also notes the importance of convenience. Convenience is critical when it comes to engaging members or patients into a daily self-care program. Engagement is higher when that intervention is delivered via technologies and resources that the consumers are use to using on a daily basis for other purposes. We have been fortunate to take advantage of some of that learning in our program design and in our technology design as well.

Excerpted from Health IT in Care Management to Improve Health and Effect Behavior Change.