Posts Tagged ‘care transition’

Infographic: Malnutrition Care Needs to Be Integrated Into Care Transitions

August 17th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Malnutrition is a pervasive, but often under-diagnosed, condition in the United States. This prevalence is exacerbated among those with chronic diseases such as diabetes, cancer, and gastrointestinal, pulmonary, heart, and chronic kidney disease and their treatments can result in changes in nutrient intake and ability to use nutrients, which can lead to malnutrition, according to a new infographic by Defeat Malnutrition Today, a coalition of over 75 organizations and stakeholders working to defeat older adult malnutrition.

The infographic provides details on malnutrition prevalence across care settings, existing patient care transitions pathways and recommendations to integrate malnutrition care into care transitions.

Innovative Community Health Partnerships: Clinical Alliances to Reduce Health Disparities in Underserved PopulationsAs one of the poorest urban congressional districts in the country, the Bronx, a New York City borough, was also rated as the last county (#62) in New York for health outcomes and health factors by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation. In reaction, the Bronx Health REACH initiative formed the “#Not62,” campaign to transform the health of the community.

Innovative Community Health Partnerships: Clinical Alliances to Reduce Health Disparities in Underserved Populations highlights the models of change and key initiatives developed through Bronx Health REACH’s community health transformation project.

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HINfographic: Care Transitions Management 2.0

January 11th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Call it Care Transitions Management 2.0—innovative ideas ranging from recording patient discharge instructions to enlisting fire departments and pharmacists to conduct home visits and reconcile medications.

To improve 30-day readmissions and avoid costly Medicare penalties, more than one-third of respondents to the 2015 Care Transitions Management survey—34 percent—have designed programs in this area, drawing inspiration from the Coleman Care Transitions Program®, Project BOOST®, Project RED, Guided Care® and other models.

A new infographic by HIN examines how care transitions data is transmitted, which care transition is the most critical to manage and the top five discharge summary components.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions ManagementManagement of patient handoffs—between providers, from hospital to home or skilled nursing facility, or SNF to hospital—is a key factor in the delivery of value-based care. Poorly managed care transitions drive avoidable readmissions, ER use, medication errors and healthcare spend.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management, HIN’s fourth annual analysis of these cross-continuum initiatives, examines programs, models, protocols and results associated with movement of patients from one care site to another, including the impact of care transitions management on quality metrics and the delivery of value-based care. Click here for more information.

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HINfographic: 2015 Post-Acute Care Challenge: How to Foster Warm Handoffs

September 16th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

With patient transitions between care sites a top post-acute care (PAC) challenge for 25 percent of healthcare organizations, discharge planning, hiring of care transition navigators and data exchange are helping to facilitate ‘warm handoffs’—full-circle communication between hospital and post-acute care clinicians regarding a patient’s care—according to 2015 Healthcare Intelligence Network metrics.

A new infographic by HIN examines the top strategies to improve post-acute care and reduce costs and the percentage of healthcare organizations that include post-acute care in value-based reimbursement methodologies.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Post-Acute Care TrendsHealthcare is exploring new post-acute care (PAC) delivery and payment models to support high-quality, coordinated and cost-effective care across the continuum—a direction that ultimately will hold PAC organizations more accountable for the care they provide. For example: two of four CMS Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) models include PAC services; and beginning in 2018, skilled nursing facilities (SNFs) will be subject to Medicare readmissions penalties.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Post-Acute Care Trends captures efforts by 92 healthcare organizations to enhance care coordination for individuals receiving post-acute services following a hospitalization—initiatives like the creation of a preferred PAC network or collaborative. Click here for more information.

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Post-Acute Care Payment Bundles: Catalyst for Clinical Redesign, Improved Care Transitions

July 30th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Brooks Rehabilitation jumped at the opportunity to participate in CMS’ Bundled Payments for Care Improvement (BPCI) program to be at the forefront of learning more about healthcare payment reform, said Debbie Reber, MHS, OTR, vice president of clinical services, Brooks Rehabilitation.

We saw it as an opportunity for post-acute care providers to help make some of the healthcare policy changes related to the future of healthcare reimbursement. We also really want it to serve as a catalyst for our business to begin working better as a system of care, Ms. Reber explained during last month’s webinar, Bundled Payments for Post-Acute Care: Four Critical Paths To Success, a Healthcare Intelligence Network webinar now available for replay.

Post-Acute Care Payment Bundles: Catalyst for Clinical Redesign, Improved Care Transitions

Brooks Rehabilitation achieves 19 percent savings over historic spend and reduces readmission rates to 15 percent through Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Program.

“Our move toward bundled payments was a great opportunity to improve our care transitions, our continuum,” said Reber. “The other huge opportunity is to experiment with clinical redesign. As we approached bundle pay, we approached it with ‘we have a blank slate. We can redesign the care to look and feel however we want it to be. If we were doing things all over again, what are the things or the gaps or cracks to the clinical care that we could really improve upon?'”

“We knew that we wanted to have a strong voice regarding future policy and payment reform changes. We really wanted to show that we were sophisticated enough to take risk and play a primary role with that continuum of care,” she added.

Brooks is serving under CMS’ Model 3, in which it selects from a list of DRGs. It started in October 2013 with fractures, hip and knee replacements as well as hip and knee revisions.

Brooks added congestive heart failure, non-cervical and cervical fusions and back and neck surgery bundles this past April.

“All of our bundles are for an episode length of 60 days with the only exception to that being congestive heart failure. We did heart failure for 30 days just due to the tremendous risk of managing those cases and to decrease our risk overall with that population,” Reber explained.

Brooks begins its process when the patient leaves the acute care facility.

“We are then responsible for all non-hospice Part A and B services, including physician visits, DME, medications, post-acute therapy or rehab services, as well as any readmission,” she said. Of particular note is that the readmissions are not just related to the acute episodes that we are seeing them for…it’s for any reason that the patient would be readmitted.

Understanding what those readmission reasons are is huge to our success, Reber explained. For example, on the orthopedic side, even though the patients have just been seen for an orthopedic surgery, the primary reason for readmission is predominantly around cardiac issues or pulmonary issues that are more likely due to prior comorbidities. It’s really just managing those issues more.

Brooks has achieved an overall savings of about 19 percent over its historic spend and has decreased its readmission rate to about 15 percent across the 60-day time frame within this program. And, has also seen increases in patient functional improvement and patient satisfaction rates.

During the webinar, Reber walked participants through the four domains that have been critical to its success in the BPCI program, including: using standardized assessments across care settings; patient and caregiver engagement; the in-house developed Care Compass Tool, which includes a longitudinal care plan; and enhancing the role of the care navigator.

Driving Quality Care Transitions: Infographic

May 25th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

When transitions of care are poorly coordinated, both the patient and the healthcare organization suffer. Without proper education, timely follow-up and tools to self-manage, patient complications and readmissions increase significantly. Healthcare organizations need effective and scalable ways of engaging and empowering patients to take active roles in their health post-discharge.

A new infographic by Emmi Solutions examines the importance of patient engagement for care transitions.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions ManagementManagement of patient handoffs—between providers, from hospital to home or skilled nursing facility, or SNF to hospital—is a key factor in the delivery of value-based care. Poorly managed care transitions drive avoidable readmissions, ER use, medication errors and healthcare spend.

In 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management, HIN’s fourth annual analysis of these cross-continuum initiatives, examines programs, models, protocols and results associated with movement of patients from one care site to another, including the impact of care transitions management on quality metrics and the delivery of value-based care.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

13 Metrics on Care Transition Management

May 7th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

Care transitions mandate: Sharpen communication between care sites.


Call it Care Transitions Management 2.0 — enterprising approaches that range from recording patient discharge instructions to enlisting fire departments and pharmacists to conduct home visits and reconcile medications.

To improve 30-day readmissions and avoid costly Medicare penalties, more than one-third of 116 respondents to the 2015 Care Transitions Management survey—34 percent—have designed programs in this area, drawing inspiration from the Coleman Care Transitions Program®, Project BOOST®, Project RED, Guided Care®, and other models.

Whether self-styled or off the shelf, well-managed care transitions enhance both quality of care and utilization metrics, according to this fourth annual Care Transitions survey conducted in February 2015 by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Seventy-four percent of respondents reported a drop in readmissions; 44 percent saw decreases in lengths of stay; 38 percent saw readmissions penalties drop; and 65 percent said patient compliance improved.

Following are eight more care transition management metrics derived from the survey:

  • The hospital-to-home transition is the most critical transition to manage, say 50 percent of respondents.
  • Heart failure is the top targeted health condition of care transition efforts for 81 percent of respondents.
  • A history of recent hospitalizations is the most glaring indicator of a need for care transitions management, say 81 percent of respondents.
  • Beyond the self-developed approach, the most-modeled program is CMS’ Community-Based Care Transitions Program, say 13 percent of respondents.
  • Eighty percent of respondents engage patients post-discharge via telephonic follow-up.
  • Discharge summary templates are used by 45 percent of respondents.
  • Home visits for recently discharged patients are offered by 49 percent of respondents.
  • Beyond the EHR, information about discharged or transitioning patients is most often transmitted via phone or fax, say 38 percent of respondents.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management

Care Transition Management

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management HIN’s fourth annual analysis of these cross-continuum initiatives, examines programs, models, protocols and results associated with movement of patients from one care site to another, including the impact of care transitions management on quality metrics and the delivery of value-based care.

4 Trends for Healthcare Providers in 2014

January 30th, 2014 by Jessica Fornarotto

Dual-track medical homes, e-visits, retooled patient handoffs and more post-acute care are predicted provider trends for 2014, according to Steven Valentine, president of The Camden Group. HIN interviewed Valentine prior to his presentation during an October webinar on Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2014: A Strategic Planning Session.

HIN: What is the physician practice going to look like in 2014? How has the primary care team evolved to meet the Triple Aim values inherent in the PCMH and accountable care models?

(Steven Valentine): We should expect to continue to see consolidation amongst the medical groups. The independent practice associations will begin to assimilate together because they need to put more money into their infrastructure. And many of the organizations have underperformed, in all honesty.

The primary care team is still critical. We’ve benefitted by keeping many primary care doctors around because they were negatively hurt with their net worth in the recession in 2008-2010. But it’s slowly coming back and we’re starting to see those physicians thinking about retirement again. The reality is, we’re never going to replace all of these primary care doctors as they wind down their practice. We need to do a better job of getting telehealth going and utilizing e-visits. We’re seeing the health plans starting to pay for those e-visits, as well as having the consumer who uses them use a credit card and pay at that time, just like a visit.

We’re going to have to look at different models. Obviously, the nurse practitioner is getting more involved with the primary care. And yes, they’re still pursuing the Triple Aim. We know that quality scores, satisfaction scores and trying to manage cost per unit is still a critical focus of the triple aim moving forward with population health.

Lastly, with a PCMH in accountable care, while some of the pioneer accountable care organizations (ACOs) reduce themselves out of pioneer into the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), we still have a number of organizations and it’s growing. The commercial ACOs have been very successful in California.

We fully expect accountable care to continue. We think the PCMH will evolve into two tracks. The first track is a primary care PCMH. The spinoff is a chronic care medical home that has the multidisciplinary team organized around a chronic disease. This is a model developed by CareMore years ago in Southern California and it’s been expanded across the country. As I travel the country, I run into organizations that have set up these chronic care centers around the chronic disease.

HIN: Regarding the Pioneer ACO program, one of the top performers in the CMS pioneer program, Monarch HealthCare, told us that it’s going to be working to engage specialists in care coordination roles in year two and year three. What’s ahead for specialists in terms of quality and performance improvement as well as shouldering perhaps more care coordination duties, especially for Medicare patients?

(Steven Valentine): The specialists are going to be a critical piece to this whole solution. They have been a tremendous asset in the area of bundled payments, where you have the facility fee and physician fee combined into one payment. That works for both the Medicare as well as the commercial side. You’re beginning to see more of the bundled payments within an ACO.

The ACO manages what we call ‘frequency’ — in other words, the number of procedures to be done. Specialists are involved in satisfaction, quality scores, and resource consumption once the decision is made that the procedure needs to be done.

We expect the specialists to be involved with quality and performance. Everybody is putting in incentive programs to help drive higher quality, better performance, and a lower cost.

HIN: Hospitals have tightened the patient discharge process as a means of shoring up care transitions. But what other work needs to be done in terms of collaborations, perhaps with skilled nursing facilities (SNFs), long-term care and home health, for example, to improve patient handoffs and reduce hospital readmissions?

(Steven Valentine): Handoffs have probably been one of the areas where we’ve seen the most disappointment or underperformance within many ACOs. They have not effectively involved the hospitalists and the care/case managers who are typically embedded within the medical group that would oversee the patient throughout the care continuum. Or if it’s a health system, emanate centralized care/case management function where they manage all of the transitions from pre-acute, acute to post-acute. We think this will get better. As the doctors are more at risk, they will get more engaged with the care/case managers to manage these transitions and handoffs.

We also know that, while not in 2014 but the trend will start, we’ll see lower acute care utilization, pushing more patients to post-acute care. This means, in any given area, acute care hospitals will begin to convert excess capacity to post-acute care services like skilled nursing, long-term care, palliative care, hospice care, home care and rehab care. You will begin to see a closer proximity. The care managers will be able to work more effectively with the doctors and hospitals to manage the patient through the continuum, smooth out these transitions and have a better patient experience with better satisfaction scores at a lower cost.

Excerpted from: Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2014: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry

Deeper Data Dive Improves ACO Performance, Quality

August 1st, 2013 by Jessica Fornarotto

Performance Quality Measurement and Reporting for Accountable Care webinar replay

What started as a closer look at John C. Lincoln Network’s 30-day Medicare readmissions for heart attack, heart failure and pneumonia kicked off a plethora of quality improvements for the Medicare Shared Savings Program, including the hiring of care transition coaches, extension of primary care hours and tightening of key gaps in care.

During HIN’s webinar, Performance Quality Measurement and Reporting for Accountable Care, two experts from JCL shared how their organization modified reporting processes — from workflow changes to customizations within its EMR — to improve performance results during its 2013 reporting year.

For its transition coach program, developed to reduce Medicare 30-day readmissions, JCL hired trained military medics to help recently discharged patients transition more easily from one setting to another, explained Heather Jelonek, chief operating officer for ACOs at JCL.

“These transition coaches go into the hospitals and meet with patients when they are admitted. They get to know the patients, they develop a rapport, and they also start to prepare the patients for discharge.”

After discharge, these coaches follow the patient for a minimum of 30 days to follow up on medical care, monitor blood pressure, explain medications and teach the patient about nutrition with the help of a registered dietician.

A deeper data dive also identified a trend among its Meals on Wheels beneficiaries: 85 percent of these patients were readmitted within 30 days almost always on Friday evenings. The patients did not have enough food to get them through the weekend since Meals on Wheels only delivers during the week.

This program has helped to reduce readmission readmission rates from almost 20 percent to just under 2 percent for those patients receiving Meals on Wheels and became an assessment area for the transitions coaches.

Encouraged, JCL sought to learn what additional data they needed from their system to respond to the reporting requirements for CMS’s 33 quality measures. They determined their course of action for 2012 and the building requirements for 2013. According to Karen Furbush, business consultant for JCL, “we have to continually re-educate each of the practices at the hospital and the ED so that they can continue to remember what’s important. And it’s not just for the ACO measures, but in general for better coordinated care.”

One change implemented immediately was the addition of a new message within EPIC, an ADT inbasket message that alerts the primary care physician (PCP) to schedule a follow-up visit within seven days. The PCP then reviews the message and forwards it to the medical assistant (MA) to schedule the visit. This change helped to meet one of the ACO quality measure as well as the transitional care management incentive.

Realizing that enhancements were needed for quality reporting, JCL added additional logic to its patient health questionnaire for future fall risk, aspirin usage and a depression scale. JCL also has ACO patient navigators who analyze reports to determine which patients were missing required measurement values and then schedule those patients by the end of the year as needed, noted Ms. Furbush. “We learned how to get the information out and quickly assess who hasn’t had the influenza or pneumococcal shots, or […] a mammography or a colorectal screening. We wanted to go out and capture that information as quickly as possible because we still had three months left to be able to find that information, whether it was in a previous system or if it was in our current EMR,” explains Furbush.

“We immediately tried to get on the phone to start scheduling these appointments, working through all the things that we need to do for the ACO, as well as just bringing the patient into the EMR completely,” Furbush continued.

Furbush also started a weekly ACO quality reporting call to discuss a group of measures to see what kind of challenges were being faced and what was being implemented. JCL also hosted two EPIC-specific subset calls to learn how everyone was using EPIC.

Once JCL received its patient sample from CMS, it sent samples to each practice. According to Furbush, “We said [to the practices] this is what CMS said this person happens to be associated with. There are 15 categories and CMS will provide a rank of one to 616, one being the highest. You have to report on 411. We had to let them know where the patients ranked for each of the disease states and that we needed information back from them if we couldn’t get it from the EMR.”

JCL continues to struggle with integration opportunities. According to Jelonek, “This includes talking to other communities and looking at HIEs as we’re making an acquisition of a new practice or signing a new community physician onto the ACO. In other words, bringing everybody to the table so that we’re all speaking the same language.”

11 Innovations in Healthcare Case Management

July 23rd, 2012 by Jackie Lyons

According to respondents from HIN’s third annual healthcare case management survey, successful case management efforts focus on transition coaching, discharge planning, reward programs and a patient-centered approach to case management.

Despite the challenges of staffing and operating a successful case management company brought on by healthcare reform and the changing industry, respondents contributed innovative interventions that improve health and reduce costs in the populations they serve.

Eleven case management program interventions that proved to be successful are:

1. Working with local community collaboratives for transition coaching. For example, respondents collaborate with a company that performs in-home health assessments on members identified with chronic diseases. The information is sent to them and they use it to direct care for their members.

2. Scheduling home visits by nurse practitioners for selected patients.

3. Redirecting to in-network providers and coordinating services in an efficient manner to prevent delay in discharges.

4. Holding case conference meetings with the treating physicians, case managers, medical directors and other related parties to address issues related to challenging or high-risk patients.

5. Verifying medication and home healthcare strategies to prevent readmission for chronic illness within 24 to 48 hours.

6. Partnering with social workers who will spend time dealing with complex family problems and end-of-life care.

7. Getting high-risk obstetrical clients to assume greater accountability for the outcome of their pregnancies and communicating with providers and educators. Respondents noted a significant decrease in low birth weight infants for RN case-managed programs focused on these objectives.

8. Utilizing diabetes reward programs to keep measures in line.

9. Integrating case management (medical and behavioral health) for a patient-centered approach.

10. Using neutral assessment and family trust to establish realization that case managers can identify affordable and appropriate resources.

11. Attaining the Advanced Achievement in Transplant Management Certification (through Interlink Health Services) so case managers better understand and educate patients about the benefits of using a Transplant Center of Excellence for the best possible clinical and financial outcomes when a transplant is needed. Respondents report successful clinical outcomes and savings range in the 40-50 percent range.