Posts Tagged ‘AHRQ’

Value, Convenience Key to Successful Use of Telehealth Technology

May 8th, 2014 by Cheryl Miller

The most sophisticated technology in the world will not engage patients and members in health improvement if they are not convinced of the value of the program to their health, the commitment of their providers to the process and the credibility of the entire care team says Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer for Pharos Innovations. Here, he discusses the importance of convenience when it comes to engaging members or patients into a daily self-care program.

AHRQ performed a technology assessment looking at the use of information technology (IT) and the adoption of IT by patients and members of health plans who were elderly and had chronic illness, or who were underserved and had chronic illness. This technology assessment focused on looking at interactive consumer technologies that were geared toward helping consumers improve their health. This assessment describes several factors that influence the use, usefulness and usability of these technologies, in particular in populations that we as a company and others would describe in their populations, which are the elderly or the underserved and who have chronic illness.

This review concludes that from a consumer’s perspective, programs and technologies that are used to support those programs need to have a perception of benefit to the individual who will be using them. Also, they have to be perceived as convenient and as something that can be easily integrated into the daily activities of that individual patient or member.

Ultimately, the successful use of these interactive technologies is predicated on engagement into the use of that program or technology. That is directly linked to the amount of value that the consumer might perceive about the intervention that’s being offered to them — that those technologies will have a positive impact on the health and wellness of those populations if indeed there’s a feedback loop that’s provided. This feedback loop is something that’s also crucial to the design of the engagement and ultimate intervention programs. The feedback loop may include an assessment of the current health status, interpretation of that status in light of established treatment plans and treatment goals, adjustments made to that treatment plan as needed and communication back to the patient or the member with targeted recommendations or advice. This cycle then repeats.

Lastly, this report also notes the importance of convenience. Convenience is critical when it comes to engaging members or patients into a daily self-care program. Engagement is higher when that intervention is delivered via technologies and resources that the consumers are use to using on a daily basis for other purposes. We have been fortunate to take advantage of some of that learning in our program design and in our technology design as well.

Excerpted from Health IT in Care Management to Improve Health and Effect Behavior Change.