Archive for the ‘Value-Based Reimbursement’ Category

Infographic: How Academic Medical Centers and Health Systems Are Meeting Innovation Challenges

April 25th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Healthcare policy is increasingly designed to incentivize healthcare delivery transformation and payment model reform, according to a new infographic by Russell Reynolds Associates.

The infographic examines organizational innovation at health systems across institutions.

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS SuccessA laser focus on population health interventions and processes can generate immediate revenue streams for fledgling accountable care organizations that support the hard work of creating a sustainable ACO business model. This population health priority has proven a lucrative strategy for Caravan Health, whose 23 ACO clients saved more than $26 million across approximately 250,000 covered lives in 2016 under the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success examines Caravan Health’s population health-focused approach for ACOs and its potential for positioning ACOs for success under MSSP and MACRA’s Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

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Guest Post: Demonstrating High Quality Care Becomes Paramount in the Bundled Payment Models

April 24th, 2018 by Shane Wolverton

Optimizing bundled payment model opportunities.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ (CMS) cancellation of the mandatory payment bundles for cardiac care, surgical hip and femur fracture treatment in late 2017 is expected to be replaced in 2018 with a voluntary program, called the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement Advanced (BPCI).

CMS also cancelled the cardiac rehabilitation incentive payment model and switched participation requirements in the Comprehensive Care for Joint Replacement (CJR) model from mandatory to voluntary while reducing the selected geographic areas from 67 to 33.

In the BPCI Advanced model, providers will be expected to share in the financial risk and redesign of care delivery to reduce expenditures while maintaining or improving performance on specific quality measures.

CMS’ decision regarding payment under the CJR model that allows total knee arthroplasty to be performed in outpatient settings has caused considerable concern for providers in the acute care setting due to potential loss of revenue to lower cost care settings. Despite these uncertainties, some hospitals under the CJR model have reduced spend per episode and implant costs by over 20 percent.

Regardless of the programs offered by CMS in 2018, providers should focus on finding ways to optimize the bundled payment opportunity with self-funded employers or other plan sponsors as they look to bundles for lowering spend and improving quality. Many of these arrangements require providers to implement stop-loss that assumes risk for utilization beyond the bundled rate. With bundles now offered by ambulatory surgery centers consistent utilization and quality performance becomes paramount. There are numerous organizations scaling to meet increasing demand for this type of value-based care ushering in greater competition.

Maximizing the Benefits of Bundled Payments

The key to success depends on the ability of the organization to foster multi-disciplinary teamwork organized around more refined episodic analysis looking at structure, process indicators and outcomes. These advanced analytics serve as the roadmap to thrive with this payment model. It is vital that the analytics be clinically focused and risk adjusted to determine whether variation is manageable or due to the clinical and demographics of the patients.

Four Steps

First, identify physician leaders to guide the study of current practice patterns, patient throughput and post-acute care. While the physicians facilitate this process, it is recommended that nursing, supply chain, pharmacy and other stakeholders be included.

Second, develop the analytic tools to assess care across the continuum using claims, EMR, and process and patient reported outcomes. Organizations should look for analytics that allow stakeholders to see severity-adjusted episode of illness across the entire continuum of patient care. Accurately comparing the total cost and utilization of medical services against peer groups, national norms, and best practices is important as the trend in bundles is to cover post procedural spend for as long as 90 days. It is essential to compile analytics refined enough to define the current performance and model the expected bundled rates and outcomes. If this step is not performed rigorously, the organization faces considerable risk and discontentment by stakeholders.

Third, determine how the bundles rate will be distributed to the physicians and facilities. This must include incentives for improvement for all stakeholders as margins improve and quality increases.

Fourth, educate the patients and families, as key stakeholders to empower them to work as part of a coordinated team. Providing clear information about the episode can reduce anxiety and improve adherence to recommended therapies and medications pre and post-surgery. Using navigators is a proven approach to help patients through the episode of care.

Patient Selection

As the journey into bundled care begins with the selection of patients best suited for this type of care, it is advantageous to build a repeatable and evidence-based approach to delivering this care. More variability in the clinical and demographic attributes of the patient leads to greater potential variance in treatment. It is vital that the teams develop a consistent care path especially early into the program. This fosters the knowledge required to set utilization and quality outcomes firmly in alignment with the bundled rate. Even the slightest inconsistencies can have significant impact on the programs performance.

Healthcare Performance Management & Analytics

With bundled payments, providers and healthcare delivery organizations benefit from the savings, provided the outcomes of the patient meet expectations. There are some arrangements where quality performance guarantees are included as part of the agreement. For instance, one of the most comprehensive arrangements is the inclusion of a lifetime guarantee for hip arthroplasty. As more care moves from the acute care setting into ambulatory surgery centers or hospital outpatient departments the price of bundles will be commoditized and attractive margins harder to maintain. Patients may also believe that lower cost settings of care may also translate to the delivery of lower quality of care. This puts tremendous pressure on hospitals to begin diligent work on bundles knowing they have a cost disadvantage compared to outpatient settings. Demonstrating high quality care to patients regardless of setting will foster greater trust with employers and payers and reduce the reluctance for patients to seek treatment in the outpatient setting.

Assessment of risk adjusted mortality, complications and unanticipated readmissions along with Agency Healthcare Research and Quality patient safety indicators is essential in building and maintaining a bundled program. These indicators must be risk adjusted properly to validate performance, remediate poor outcomes, credential providers and market the program. The use of statistical process control techniques is also required to discern random versus special cause variation in utilization or outcomes. It would be desirable to use methods published in peer reviewed journals for integrity with the medical staff.

As plan sponsors look for lower cost settings, the quality of care delivered becomes even more important since partnering with a low quality facility may impact the success of this program and their bottom line. Providers that can share their level of safety and performance measures based on reliable and comprehensive analytics will be in a far better position to attract patient volume with better outcomes.

About the Author:

Shane Wolverton

Shane Wolverton is SVP Corporate Development at Quantros. He is responsible for establishing business partnerships for the company and is a sought after speaker on a wide range topics around value-based healthcare delivery.

With over 25 years of deep domain expertise in the use of clinically and risk-adjusted medical analytics he works with many stakeholders in healthcare including employers, brokers, benefits consultants, vendors & providers. He is currently working with numerous organizations leading the movement toward value-based care through high performance networks, COEs, transparency, consumer navigation, bundles of care and network optimization. In addition, he advises hospitals, and physicians, in the use of advanced analytics to drive clinical performance improvement, clinical documentation improvement and performance based marketing communications.

Prior to joining Quantros, Mr. Wolverton served as senior vice president of corporate development at Comparion Medical Analytics. He also served as a management consultant with Health Care Investment Analysts (now IBM Truven Health Analytics) and the McGraw-Hill Healthcare Management Group. He received his undergraduate degree from Auburn University.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Mounting Pressure from Value-Based Reimbursement Models Drives Clinical Improvement Strategy at Allina Health System

April 17th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Value-Based Reimbursement Models Drive Clinical Improvement Strategy

As a greater percentage of hospital payments are through value-based contracts, hospitals that reduce costs while maintaining quality will survive, predicts Pam Rush, cardiovascular clinical service line program director at Allina Health.

“How do we improve outcomes and decrease costs?” Rush asked participants in the March 2018 webinar, Predictive Healthcare Analytics: Four Pillars for Success. “We need to start to look at the world differently.”

How can we be more creative and do things differently? How can we use different members of the healthcare teams in new ways, such as nurse practitioners or advanced practice providers, she added. In addition, “we need to invest in data analytics and data resources and have data analysts who can pull the information for us so we can find the variation. We need to invest in physician and caregiver time to look at the data, to make changes in how they improve care, to monitor and see what is working and what doesn’t work.”

These four pillars…population health management, reducing clinical variation, testing new care processes and new models of payment, and leveraging cutting edge technologies…have been critical to the work at Allina Health System’s Minneapolis Heart Institute Center for Healthcare Delivery Innovation, said Rush.

In population health management, we’re looking at how can we focus on adherence to guidelines, identify where there are gaps in care and partner with people across the system, primary care and specialists, to improve consistency and adherence to guidelines, she explained.

Allina is reducing clinical variation by looking at unnecessary variations in care where there is inconsistent care without an influence on outcomes.

“We’re also looking at new ways of doing things. How can we use our nurse practitioners, how do we care for patients once they’re discharged from the hospital and bring them back in for clinic visits? It’s really looking at the care model and how we can do things differently to reduce total cost of care,” she said.

In cardiology, there are so many new devices, procedures and techniques to monitor, said Rush, but we need to figure out who are the right providers to do that monitoring, who are the right patients to do these expensive procedures on and who achieves the best outcomes, because we can’t afford to do all of this new technology to every single person.

Allina looks at these four pillars across the continuum. Starting in primary care to partner on prevention strategies, moving to who gets referred to cardiology, and when they’re referred to cardiology, what are the set of tests or treatments and guidelines to adhere to along the continuum to subspecialties, emergency services and all the way up through advanced therapies, such as transplant.

During the webinar, Rush along with Dr. Steven Bradley, cardiologist, MHI and associate director, MHI Healthcare Delivery Innovation Center, shared these four pillars of predictive analytics success along with details on creating a culture of quality and innovation, building performance improvement dashboards, as well as several case examples of quality improvement initiatives contributing to these savings and much more.

Listen to Ms. Rush describe how MHI leveraged an enterprise data warehouse to identify care gaps and clinical quality improvement opportunities.

Infographic: Unlocking the Power of Population Health

April 16th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Population health management is one of the primary strategies for achieving greater value in healthcare, according to a new infographic by leidos.

The infographic examines how healthcare organizations can create effective and sustainable population health programs.

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS SuccessA laser focus on population health interventions and processes can generate immediate revenue streams for fledgling accountable care organizations that support the hard work of creating a sustainable ACO business model. This population health priority has proven a lucrative strategy for Caravan Health, whose 23 ACO clients saved more than $26 million across approximately 250,000 covered lives in 2016 under the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success examines Caravan Health’s population health-focused approach for ACOs and its potential for positioning ACOs for success under MSSP and MACRA’s Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

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Remote Patient Monitoring Fosters a New Generation of Care Management and Preventive and Value-Based Care

April 5th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Remote Patient Monitoring

Moving healthcare out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into remote patient monitoring.

As healthcare moves out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into patients’ homes and their workplaces, and becomes much more proactive, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) has been expanding its remote patient monitoring program to foster a new generation of care management, preventive care and value-based care, according to Dr. Ravi Ramani, director of UPMC’s Integrative Heart Failure Program.

The remote patient monitoring program at UPMC has its roots in the heart failure program but has since expanded to additional disease states across the integrated delivery system’s continuum of care.

After achieving reductions in all-cause readmission rates from its remote monitoring of heart failure patients, UPMC knew that the clinical processes were effective and, therefore, was ready to scale the program, said Dr. Ramani during Remote Patient Monitoring at UPMC: Creating Early Warning Systems To Reduce Unplanned Healthcare Utilization, a March 2018 webinar now available for replay.

“To really scale the program and get into the population level management,” said Dr. Ramani, “we really need a vastly reduced cost per unit. The only way to really do this is to leverage what the patients already have, which is ‘Bring Your Own Device.'”

UPMC also focused on refining their operational model so that they select the right patients, put them through an appropriate care pathway, and then integrate all of its other resources to work together, including analytics, operations and finances.

During the webinar, Dr. Ramani shared how UPMC: aligned its various stakeholders for remote patient monitoring success; assessed its hardware needs as patients transitioned through high-risk and low-risk stratifications; leveraged its Enterprise Master Patient Index for remote patient monitoring; and developed its clinical process for bringing new disease states into remote patient monitoring. Dr. Ramani also shared the impact of the program on unplanned care, including ED visits and admissions, and patient satisfaction.

Listen to Dr. Ramani share UPMC’s nine-point vision for a sustainable, scalable remote patient monitoring program.

Infographic: The Pharma Value Chain Is Ripe for Disruption

February 26th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Despite today’s healthcare crisis, pharma has maintained a fairly consistent market structure—until now, according to a new infographic by Oliver Wyman.

The infographic examines the factors contributing to pharma’s evolution and disruption as part of the changes in healthcare regulation, transparency and accountability.

Leveraging Pharmacists to Reduce Cost and Improve Medication Adherence in High-Risk PopulationsWhen it comes to medication management for Medicare beneficiaries, there are more than 25 different factors that can complicate proper use of prescribed medicines—from affordability issues, even among the insured, to fear of a drug’s side effects to potential dangers from high-risk medications or health conditions.

Leveraging Pharmacists to Reduce Cost and Improve Medication Adherence in High-Risk Populations examines Novant Health’s deployment of pharmacists as part of its five-pronged strategy to deliver healthcare value through medication management services.

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Infographic: Trends Disrupting the Healthcare Industry

February 19th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Value-based healthcare, predictive medicine, digital healthcare and the patient experience are key trends disrupting the healthcare industry, according to a new infographic by EPAM Systems, Inc.

The infographic drills down on each of these trends and their impact on the industry.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2018: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare IndustryHealthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2018: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN’s 14th annual business forecast, is designed to support healthcare C-suite planning as leaders react to presidential priorities and seek new strategies for engaging providers, patients and health plan members in value-based care.

HIN’s highly anticipated annual strategic playbook opens with perspectives from industry thought leader Brian Sanderson, managing principal, healthcare services, Crowe Horwath, who outlines a roadmap to healthcare provider success by examining the key issues, challenges and opportunities facing providers in the year to come. Following Sanderson’s outlook is guidance for healthcare payors from David Buchanan, president, Buchanan Strategies, on navigating seven hot button areas for insurers, from the future of Obamacare to the changing face of telehealth to the surprising role grocery stores might one day play in healthcare delivery. Click here for more information.

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Infographic: Transforming the U.S. Medical Imaging Industry

February 14th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

The United States medical imaging market is transforming from a “get bigger” approach that emphasizes quantity to a “get better” approach that emphasizes quality, safety, and improvements in workflow efficiency, according to a new infographic by Frost & Sullivan.

The infographic analyzes how stakeholders are looking to new products, technologies and solutions to enhance interoperability and bring about automation and analytics-based solutions to make the industry more process-driven.

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success A laser focus on population health interventions and processes can generate immediate revenue streams for fledgling accountable care organizations that support the hard work of creating a sustainable ACO business model. This population health priority has proven a lucrative strategy for Caravan Health, whose 23 ACO clients saved more than $26 million across approximately 250,000 covered lives in 2016 under the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

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Population Health Tactics to Boost an ACO’s Medicare Annual Wellness Visit Rates

February 9th, 2018 by Patricia Donovan

One of the most important revenue opportunities for primary care physicians, and for population health nurses under their direct supervision, is the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV), advises Tim Gronninger, senior vice president of development and strategy, Caravan Health. The AWV offers an opportunity to check a number of Medicare quality boxes, including preventive check-ins, vaccinations and health screenings, to help make sure that a beneficiary’s medical needs are being met.

Here, Gronninger suggests ways that physician practices can improve all-important AWV rates.

Much of increasing annual wellness visit rates is about how to manage expectations of the practice and of the patient. You’ll be chasing your tail a lot if you are looking at your data and saying, “Well, these 1,000 patients haven’t had an annual wellness visit. I’m going to make a thousand phone calls, and then I’m going to make a thousand follow-up phone calls to try to schedule them all.”

It is very important for a practice to create a process where you have the time, the space and the plan, so that when a patient comes in the door for an Evaluation and Management (E&M) visit, the patient is handed off seamlessly to a nurse coordinator to complete an annual wellness visit at the same time. Obviously, different patients will require different handling. But we have found a very high acceptance rate from that approach among patients of clients that we work with.

It’s something that many patients take for granted, that their clinician knows this about them already. However, many times, the physician in practice doesn’t know whether the patient is up to date on their mammograms or other types of screenings.

Editor’s Note: Caravan Health’s ACOs saved more than $26 million in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) and achieved higher than average quality scores and quality reporting scores in 2016.

Source: Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success

ACO population health

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success examines Caravan Health’s population health-focused approach for ACOs and its potential for positioning ACOs for success under MSSP and MACRA’s Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).

In Successful ACOs, Population Health Focus Paves Way for Shared Savings Payouts

January 25th, 2018 by Patricia Donovan

Physician practices toiling in fledgling ACOs and obsessing over shared savings that have not yet materialized, take heart: population health offers multiple revenue streams for accountable care organizations waiting for the “gravy” of accountable care.

“Gravy” is the way Tim Gronniger, senior vice president of development and strategy for Caravan Health, refers to ACO shared savings payouts, which he says can take considerable time to accrue.

“It is literally two years from the time you jump into an ACO before you have even the chance of a shared savings payout,” Gronniger told participants in Generating Population Health Revenue: ACO Best Practices for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success, a January 2018 webcast now available for replay.

Obsessing over shared savings is one of the biggest mistakes hospitals in ACOs can make, he added.

This delay is one reason Caravan Health urges its ACOs to adopt a population health focus, whether pursuing the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Quality Payment Program (QPP) Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) or the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Gronniger’s advice is predicated on his organization’s experience of mentoring 38 ACOs. In 2016, Caravan Health’s ACOs saved more than $26 million in the MSSP program and achieved higher than average quality scores and quality reporting scores, according to recently released CMS data.

Walking attendees through a MACRA primer, Gronniger underscored the challenges of the MIPS program, one of three tracks offered under the Quality Payment Program. “Barring a really exceptional performance on MIPS, you can’t even break even over the next few years on physician compensation,” he said.

In the meantime, ACOs should utilize recently rolled out Medicare billing codes, from the annual wellness visit (AWV) to advanced care planning, to generate wellness revenue. With proper planning, reengineering of staffing and clinical work flows, a practice could generate anywhere from five hundred to one thousand dollars annually per eligible Medicare patient, Gronniger estimates—monies that offset the cost of constructing a sustainable ACO business model.

To back up this population health rationale, Gronniger pointed to data from an ACO client demonstrating the impact of a cohesive PHM approach, including the use of trained population health nurses, on completion rates for preventive screenings. For less top-of-mind screenings like falls assessment and smoking cessation, completion rates rose from negligible to near-universal levels, he said.

“These are recommended sets of screens that are required by CMS, but that also help ACOs with quality measures,” he added.

Gronniger also shared examples of dashboards, scorecards and roadmaps Caravan Health employs to help keep client ACOs on track. An ACO success strategy involves “a lot of dashboarding, checking in, and discussion of problems and barriers, discussion of solutions, and monthly and quarterly measurement and reporting back,” he said.

Beyond coveted shared savings, ACO participation offers significant non-financial benefits, including quality improvements under both MSSP and MIPS standards, availability of ACO-specific waivers, and access to proprietary performance data.

Overall, ACO participation can make providers more attractive both to commercial contractors and to potential patients perusing Physician Compare ratings in greater numbers.

Gronniger ended by weighing in on the recent recommendation by the Medicare Payment Advisory Commission (MedPAC) to repeal and replace the MIPS program.