Archive for the ‘Value-Based Reimbursement’ Category

Healthcare Reacts to AHCA: Providers ‘Cannot Support Legislation As Drafted’

March 13th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

American Health Care ActLast week's unveiling of G.O.P. legislation designed to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA) triggered a flurry of concerns and criticisms from healthcare industry sectors.

The proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA) would eliminate Obamacare's individual mandate and put in place refundable tax credits for individuals to purchase health insurance. It also proposes restructuring Medicaid and defunding Planned Parenthood. However, the bill seeks to maintain protections for individuals with pre-existing conditions and to permit children to remain on their parents' insurance plans until they reach the age of 26.

As of last Friday, the proposed American Health Care Act (AHCA) had cleared two committees in the U.S. House of Representatives; a final House vote on the bill is expected the week of March 20.

In a letter to leaders of the House committees that will mark up the AHCA, the American Medical Association (AMA) rejected the ACA replacement bill. In the letter, AMA CEO and Executive Vice President James L. Madara, MD, stated that his organization "cannot support the AHCA as drafted because of the expected decline in health
insurance coverage and the potential harm it would cause to vulnerable patient populations."

In particular, the AMA, the nation's largest physicians' group representing more than 220,000 doctors, residents, and medical students, objected to the bill's proposed restructuring of Medicaid, claiming it "would limit states’ ability to respond to changes in service demands and threaten coverage for people with low incomes."

The AMA's position was also outlined in a statement issued by Andrew W. Gurman, MD, AMA president.

Meanwhile, the American Hospital Association (AHA), which counts 5,000 hospitals among its members, also opposed the AHCA. In a news release, Rick Pollack, AHA president and CEO, stated that the AHA "cannot support The American Health Care Act in its current form." The AHA stated that it would be difficult to evaluate the bill without coverage estimates by the Congressional Budget Office (CBO).

Echoing AMA apprehension over proposed Medicaid restructuring, Pollack stated that the AHA feared the bill "will have the effect of making significant reductions in a program that provides services to our most vulnerable populations, and already pays providers significantly less than the cost of providing care."

Although Pollack lauded recent Congessional efforts to address behavioral health issues, including the growing opioid abuse epidemic, he stressed that "significant progress in these areas is directly related to whether individuals have coverage. And, we have already seen clear evidence of how expanded coverage is helping to address these high-priority needs."

Also seeking adequate Medicaid funding in the AHCA was America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), a national association whose 1,300 members provide coverage for healthcare and related services to more than 200 million Americans.

In a letter to two key House committees, AHIP President and CEO Marilyn Tavenner stated that "Medicaid health plans are at the forefront of providing coverage for and access to behavioral health services and treatment for opioid use disorders, and insufficient funding could jeopardize the progress being made on these important public health fronts."

However, AHIP commended the proposed legislation for its "number of positive steps to help stabilize the market and create a bridge to a reformed market during the 2018 and 2019 transition period" and "pledged to work collaboratively to shape the final legislation."

"AHIP members are committed to reducing cost growth by using value-based care arrangements and other innovative programs to address chronic illnesses and better manage the care of the highest-need patients," Tavenner concluded.

In a statement on Friday, Secretary of Health and Human Services Tom Price, MD, committing his agency to using its regulatory authority to create greater flexibility in the Medicaid program for states, including "a review of existing waiver procedures to provide states the impetus and freedom to innovate and test new ideas to improve access to care and health outcomes."

5-Part Framework for MIPS Success Under MACRA

March 2nd, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

Before picking MACRA pace, physician practices should construct a framework for MIPS success.

Along with picking a MACRA pace, physician practices should construct a framework for MIPS success.

Regardless of the pace a healthcare organization sets for Quality Payment Program participation, there are some key tactics that should form the framework of any MACRA initiative. Here, William Holding, consultant with PDA Inc., outlines the critical elements organizations need to achieve "MACRA-readiness."

  • The first component for success is perhaps the most important, and that's having a culture of provider support. A willingness to explore new options. This component is free, so if you don't have that culture in place today, before going and investing in analytics products, performance improvement or new staffing, you've got to put this culture in place. We have seen organizations do this successfully, and make the journey into accountable care organizations (ACOs) or value-based programs by working on this piece first.
  • Second is strategic planning. Set measurable goals. That's important. Look ahead one year, two years, three years. Set goals that have timelines, and goals that are reasonably achievable.
  • The next piece is strong leadership. If you don't have a quality committee or a Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) committee, consider establishing one, and establishing a position lead in that program. It should be a multidisciplinary effort. Pull physicians, mid-levels, nursing leadership, IT and program management into that program. You should have tailored reporting strategies that align with your planning efforts.

    I've experienced teams that didn't work well. In working with large systems, even with the support of clinical leadership and with the right analytical skills, efforts, I have witnessed efforts that were slower than they should have been until they brought in the right team member. This team member possessed in-depth knowledge of clinical workflows, had clout within the organization, knew personnel across IT, could talk to providers, and was a good communicator. When that person was on the team, the efforts began to move forward much faster. You've got to find the right people to be involved.

  • Next, data analytics is key. This starts with an individual with the right skills. It doesn't mean you have to buy the most expensive solution for this. Sometimes ad hoc solutions work just fine for certain organizations. However, you need the right individual who knows the data, who knows how to respond to requests from leadership, and who can really own it.
  • Lastly, clinical documentation is essential. Doing that well will improve your position in this program.

Source: Physician MACRA-Readiness: Mining QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize MIPS Performance

social determinants of health

Physician MACRA-Readiness: Mining QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize MIPS Performance describes the wealth of data analytics available from the CMS Enterprise Portal—Quality Resource Use Reports (QRURs) and other analyses providing a window into practice performance under the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). MIPS is one of two MACRA reimbursement paths and the one where most physician practices are expected to align.

Infographic: Navigating the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System

February 17th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

The goal of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services' new quality program, the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), is to streamline quality reporting to CMS and improve care, according to a new infographic by athenaInsight, Inc.

The infographic examines how MIPS will impact an average clinician this year…and in 2019 when the 2017 reporting will impact a clinician's reimbursement rates.

Infographic: EHR + CRM = Superior Patient Engagement

Under CMS's "Pick Your Pace" choices for Year 1 Quality Payment Program participation, physician practices may opt for the minimum activity necessary to avoid a payment penalty in 2019: simply submitting some data in 2017.

However, instead of delaying MACRA participation to the later part of this year, physicians should prepare and better position themselves today for MIPS success by analyzing their existing CMS data on their practices' performance and laying a path toward performance improvement.

Physician MACRA-Readiness: Mining QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize MIPS Performance describes the wealth of data analytics available from the CMS Enterprise Portal--Quality Resource Use Reports (QRURs) and other reports providing a window into practice performance under the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). MIPS is one of two MACRA reimbursement paths and the one where most physician practices are expected to align.

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Providers, Patients Outline Healthcare Priorities to New HHS Secretary

February 16th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

As HHS secretary Tom Price begins his tenure, the ACA and physician reimbursement are on constituents' minds.

As HHS secretary Tom Price begins his tenure, the ACA and physician reimbursement are on constituents' minds.

As Rep. Tom Price settles into his new role as secretary of the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), organizations representing physician practices, nurses, patient groups and actuaries are making their healthcare priorities known to the newly confirmed administrator.

Concerns range from the future of the Affordable Care Act, which President Trump pledged to repeal in a January 2017 executive order, to specifics of new physician reimbursement programs resulting from MACRA (Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015).

In a news release from the American Association of Nurse Practitioners, America's leading nursing organizations called on the Trump administration and Congress to prioritize patient health and the patient-provider relationship in any health reform proposals. Representing over 3.5 million nurses, the organizations affirmed their shared commitment to advancing patient-centered healthcare and healthcare policies that reflect five key areas ranging from ensuring patients access to healthcare with affordable coverage options regardless of preexisting conditions to creating greater efficiency in the Medicare system.

On the patient side, I Am Essential, a coalition of more than 200 patient groups, asked Price to preserve key ObamaCare protections, including one that guarantees coverage for those with pre-existing conditions.

In its letter, the coalition said certain ObamaCare provisions have provided improved access to care to millions living with chronic and serious health conditions.

"While it is not a perfect law," the letter stated, "The ACA has provided health coverage and improved access to care for tens of millions of Americans living with chronic and serious health conditions, many of whom were previously uninsured or underinsured. If they lose access and coverage for even one day, their health and well-being can be immediately jeopardized."

The letter concluded with the following statement: "As you make any changes, we urge you not to go back on the promise of affordable and quality care and treatment for everyone, especially those living with chronic and serious health conditions."

Meanwhile, a letter from the Medical Group Management Association (MGMA), which represents more than 18,000 U.S. healthcare organizations in which 385,000 physicians practice, asked the new administrator to "significantly reduce the regulatory burden on physician practices and improve the quality and efficiency of healthcare delivery in this country."

Focused on the federal payor's new Quality Payment Program resulting from MACRA, the MGMA requested the following from Price, who worked in private practice as an orthopedic surgeon for nearly twenty years prior to launching his political career:

  • A reduction in the cost and reporting burden of the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS);
  • A careful review of the eligible Advanced Alternate Payment Program (APM) risk standard and contend there is significant inherent risk in moving from fee-for-service to risk-bearing arrangements, including substantial investment and operational costs, as well as misaligned financial incentives between the payment systems; and
  • Legislative relief from the Federal Physician Self-Referral Law, which MGMA referred to as "a regulatory monster of mind-numbing complexity."

MGMA represents physician groups of all sizes, types, structures and specialties, and has members in every major healthcare system in the nation.

And finally, the American Academy of Actuaries released three new issue briefs examining a number of key public policy considerations policymakers should weigh when evaluating specific proposals for reforming or replacing the Affordable Care Act.

The three papers, which address high-risk pools, selling health insurance across state lines, and association health plans, are available on the academy's site.

"Differences in a reform's structure can have wide implications for stakeholders and for how it interacts with other reforms that have been or may be adopted," said Academy Senior Health Fellow Cori Uccello. "For example, high-risk pools can be structured in different ways, with different implications for access to coverage, premiums, and government spending. Further, how regulatory authority is defined for both cross-state insurance sales and association health plans affects whether insurers would compete on a level playing field."

HINfographic: Healthcare Industry Trends for 2017

February 8th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Value-based healthcare, the drive for quality and the uncertainty regarding the Affordable Care Act under the President Donald Trump administration are just some of the factors impacting the healthcare industry this year, according to HIN's Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2017: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry.

A new infographic by HIN examines the key trends that will impact the healthcare industry this year.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2017: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry Not in recent history has the outcome of a U.S. presidential election portended so much for the healthcare industry. Will the Trump administration repeal or replace the Affordable Care Act (ACA)? What will be the fate of MACRA? Will Medicare and Medicaid survive?

These and other uncertainties compound an already daunting landscape that is steering healthcare organizations toward value-based care and alternative payment models and challenging them to up their quality game.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2017: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN's 13th annual business forecast, is designed to support healthcare C-suite planning during this historic transition as leaders prepare for both a new year and new presidential leadership.

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Physician Supplemental QRUR: Episode-Specific Patient-Level Data Tells Story of High Utilizers

February 7th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

QRUR reports provide a mirror into physicians' cost and quality performance under MACRA.

As year one of MACRA unfolds, healthcare providers deterred by security hurdles associated with CMS Enterprise Portal access may want to reconsider. The wealth of aggregate quality and cost performance data available through the portal is well worth the trouble of accessing it, advises William Holding, consultant with PDA, Inc.

Specifically, Quality Resource and Utilization Reports (QRURs) downloadable from the portal are essential tools for physician practices that hope to succeed on MACRA-defined reimbursement paths, Holding said—even practices equipped with robust internal reporting systems.

"This is the same system that accountable care organizations (ACOs) use, and that CMS uses for many other things, so it's a good idea to get past those barriers," he explained during Physician MACRA Preparation: Using QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize Your Performance, a February 2017 webinar now available for replay.

Originally designed for CMS's value-based modifier, QRURs are good indicators of future cost performance under MACRA, via either Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), where most physician practices are expected to fall initially, or Alternate Payment Models (APMs), he said.

After providing an overview of MIPS and APMs, including five essential prerequisites to MACRA preparation, Holding delved into the quality and cost metrics contained in QRURs, from aggregate data in the main report to detailed tables rich with patient-specific information.

The main QRUR report illustrates where a physician practice falls in relation to other practices on the overall composite for cost and quality. The QRUR's Quality portion shows scores for a series of domains, including effective clinical care and patient experience, which offer a great window into how a practice might perform with different selected measures in MIPS.

Next, QRUR cost performance indicates per capita costs for attributed beneficiaries, which will remain a cost measure in MIPS.

Drilling down, Holding characterized seven associated QRUR downloads—including one table on individual eligible professional performance on the 2015 PQRS Measures—as even more useful than the QRURs themselves.

And finally, he termed the downloadable supplemental QRUR "a very powerful tool" that drills down to the beneficiary level, providing a snapshot of some of the highest cost events occurring among a practice's patients.

"For high utilizers, for specific episodes, you can drill right down to the patient to try and understand the story. What's happening to your patient when they're not in your practice, and what can you do about it?" said Holding.

Having presented the available reports, Holding described four key benefits of using QRUR downloads, including as a priority setting tool, and then detailed the myriad of ways QRURs can be analyzed to improve MIPS performance.

However, Holding stressed, even physician practices with the most sophisticated reporting structures will not thrive under MACRA without the right team or culture of provider support in place. He closed his presentation with a formula for determining investment in performance improvement activities and a five-step plan for MACRA preparation.

Listen to an interview with William Holding on the use of QRURs to determine a physician practice's highest value referral pathways.

Infographic: ACO Trends

January 23rd, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Momentum in value-based care has been building over the last several years, and 2016 was no exception, according to a new infographic by Oliver Wyman.

The infographic maps out the more than 630 ACOs in the United States.

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-LifeWhen acknowledging its position as a top-ranking Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), Memorial Hermann is quick to credit its own physicians—who in 2007 lobbied for a clinically integrated network that formed the foundation of the current Memorial Hermann accountable care organization (ACO). Now, eight years later, collaboration and integration continue to be the engines driving the ACO's cost savings, reduced utilization and healthy patient engagement rates associated with Memorial Hermann ACO's highest-risk population.

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-Life details Memorial Hermann's carefully executed journey to quality and the culmination of the ACO's community-based care management program.

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Infographic: Maternity Episodes of Care

January 16th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Maternity Episodes of CareThe cost of maternity care varies significantly by payer (commercial or Medicaid), by type of birth (vaginal or cesarean section), and by setting (hospital or birth center). Too often, women are not experiencing optimal outcomes in maternity care despite the significant resources spent, according to a new infographic by the Health Care Payment Learning & Action Network.

The infographic examines how an episode of care could be applied to maternity care—from an episode timeline for prenatal through postpartum care; episode parameters; operational considerations; and maternity care design elements.

Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey (BCBSNJ) has awarded $3 million to 51 specialty medical practices as part of a shared savings arrangement through the company's Episodes of Care (EOC) program. The doctors, in five different specialty areas, earned the payments by achieving quality, cost efficiency and patient satisfaction goals in 2014 while treating more than 8,000 Horizon BCBSNJ members. As the largest commercial payor of Episodes of Care in the United States, Horizon BCBSNJ recently reported far lower hospital readmission rates and improved clinical outcomes for members in its EOC practices versus non-EOC practices in 2014.

During Episodes of Care: Improving Clinical Outcomes and Reducing Total Cost of Care Through a Collaborative Payor-Provider Relationship, a March 31, 2016 webinar, available for replay, Lili Brillstein, director of the Horizon EOC program, shares the details behind the health plan's EOC program, from the episodes they have bundled to the goals and results from the program.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today. Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Patient Attribution Guide for Population-based Payment Models

January 2nd, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Patient Attribution Guide for Population-based Payment Models

Patient attribution is a foundational component of population-based payment (PBP) models, which are based on a simple concept: providers accepting accountability for managing the full continuum of care for their patients, according to a new infographic by the Health Care Payment Learning and Action Network.

The infographic outlines the key steps in patient attribution.

Chronic Care Management Reimbursement Compliance: Physician Requirements for Value-Based RevenueBeyond providing added revenue, billing via Medicare Chronic Care Management (CCM) CPT codes helps to bridge physician practices to value-based care delivery models like the accountable care organization (ACO) or patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Use of the CCM codes is also an opportunity to launch or enhance a chronic care management program. According to 2015 market data, nearly half of responding healthcare organizations lack a formal chronic care management structure, leaving critical reimbursement dollars on the table.

However, practices poised to bill under CCM codes must contend with vague guidance from CMS in certain areas and conflicting interpretations from outside sources on CCM implementation.

Chronic Care Management Reimbursement Compliance: Physician Requirements for Value-Based Revenue sets the record straight on CCM reimbursement compliance, offering strategies for navigating obstacles and meeting requirements.

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7 Healthcare Movements to Monitor in 2017

January 2nd, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

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Growing population base should be a 2017 priority for healthcare organizations, advises Steven Valentine.

In offering a set of guiding principles for 2017 success, Steven Valentine, vice president, Advisory Consulting Services, Premier Inc., outlines seven key areas healthcare executives should monitor in the coming year.

First, we have seen some commercial plans move to risk adjustment payments. This could be helpful or detrimental. We definitely have seen more time spent as health systems have moved to more risk payments, more two-sided models.

Next, a definition of financial responsibility (DoFR) will be critical: knowing all the various benefits that are offered and perhaps listing them on the left side of a spreadsheet. As you move across the sheet, what remains with a health plan, if anything? What would go with the physician organization? What would go to an inpatient facility acute hospital? To ambulatory providers and post-acute providers? We would advise you to begin to move in 2017 to standardize those DoFRs.

Then, if at all possible, exclude specialty drugs, where we’ve seen tremendous price increases. If you can exclude any new kinds of therapies, and I mention one there that’s been popular and growing in 2016, IVIG, and we expect a pretty good jump in 2017. Some doctors have labeled this the 'feel good infusion.'

Then, determine whether you can do anything on an exclusive basis that would help you capture more population. At the end of the day, strategically, in 2017, you need to grow your population base.

Next is effective use of comanagement agreements and a renewed focus on your risk adjustment factor (RAF) scores: there will be slight adjustments as they go down and you’re going to have to do a better and better job of documenting and trying to push those up.

Then we see patient engagement; we do want to see the patients engaged. The more you use various patient portals, the more helpful it will be.

Finally, we also look at the repatriation of patients, because if you have them under your care, you would be responsible for getting those patients and paying for them.

Source: Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2017: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Home-Visits-for-Clinically-Complex-Patients-Targeting-Transitional-Care-for-Maximum-Outcomes-and-ROI_p_5180.html

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2017: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN's thirteenth annual business forecast, is designed to support healthcare C-suite planning during this historic transition as leaders prepare for both a new year and new presidential leadership.