Archive for the ‘Telehealth & Telemedicine’ Category

HINfographic: Telehealth and Telemedicine Technologies Foster Access, Power Population Health

January 20th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

With millennials to Medicare beneficiaries strapping on fitness trackers, visiting specialists via video, and monitoring chronic conditions at home, telehealth and telemedicine services are redefining the boundaries of healthcare delivery. A 2015 Telehealth & Telemedicine survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network captured trends powering this burgeoning market, whose global value is expected to surpass $34 billion by 2020.

A new infographic by HIN examines the top clinical telehealth applications, the greatest barrier to telehealth implementation and details on telehealth adoption and ROI.

The world of digitally enabled care is exploding: the number of patients using telehealth services will rise to 7 million in 2018, according to IHS Technology; healthcare apps and 'wearables' are trending in technology circles and healthcare providers' offices; and CMS's new 'Next Generation ACO' model is expected to favor expanded telehealth coverage.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Guest Post: Delivering Value-Based Healthcare Starts at the Top

January 7th, 2016 by Nicholas Christiano, National Managing Partner, Healthcare, Tatum

The healthcare industry has long been characterized by change and evolution. Yet, new requirements introduced by the Affordable Care Act (ACA), as well as changing demands and expectations among patients, have created new pressures for today’s healthcare organizations. Healthcare providers that fail to address this new reality and meet the call for more value-based healthcare that focuses on the patient will struggle to remain sustainable in this changing world.

So, what can healthcare management do to prepare their organizations to deliver more customer-centric care? Although a recent study found that the vast majority of healthcare CEOs plan to improve their ability to innovate, change technology investments and better manage data, very few have made significant headway in these areas. As with any large-scale change, the move to customer-centric healthcare needs to start at the top. To ensure an effective transition, C-level executives, whether the CEO or chief medical officer (CMO), must take the lead to get their teams on board and ensure they can create a sustainable model for the future.

A New Approach to Patient Care

Today’s patients have greater choice in the care they receive, meaning that organizations that don’t provide a positive experience for their patients will struggle to compete. The onus to improve falls on the CEO and CMO, who must revamp the typical patient experience of waiting a long time, only to spend five to seven minutes with the physician. Healthcare leaders can improve the process by making the operation more like a concierge service—scheduling appointments at literal points in time to minimize waiting, enabling patients to enter their information only once and treating patients as valued customers. They should also strive to offer more flexibility by way of extended hours, home visits and telehealth programs that enable patients to have a remote, video-based conversation with their physician.

In addition to optimizing the patient experience, healthcare leaders must also change their cost structures. Rather than the typical process of determining prices behind closed doors and putting a margin on it, costs need to come down, be determined by performance and quality of service and be delivered with greater transparency. More and more, the industry is shifting to a value-based operating model. One such example is the accountable care organization (ACO) model, whereby healthcare providers join together to deliver a payment and care delivery approach that ties provider reimbursements to quality metrics, while driving down costs for an assigned patient population.

The ACO approach links payment to quality improvements that can reduce costs for patients; data from the U.S. Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services found that the ACO model has led to savings of $417 million since the program began in 2012. As the model continues to evolve, healthcare organizations will be managing a particular portion of the population whom they see regularly. When patients are part of a healthcare organization and receive frequent care, fewer patients will need emergency room service, resulting in lower costs. The industry is increasingly moving towards value-based operating models, but as with any change, implementing the associated customer-centric practices may be easier said than done.

Best Practices to Deliver Customer-Centric Care

To ensure their organizations remain competitive and sustainable in the face of unprecedented change across the healthcare industry, the CEO and CMO must implement the strategies that can lead to positive transformation. Though large-scale changes don’t happen overnight and inevitably will be met with some resistance, healthcare leaders should consider the following best practices to deliver a customer-centric approach:

  1. Meet patients where they are: Today’s healthcare consumers increasingly expect the same level of service from their healthcare providers that they receive in other areas of life and business. Healthcare leaders must spearhead the process changes that meet this demand, by providing greater flexibility, extended hours, home visits and telehealth.
  2. Set the tone for employees: To implement effective change management and overcome employee resistance, CEOs and CMOs must provide strong guidance throughout. Working with other C-suite executives to identify transformation needs, communicate these changes, introduce tools that can facilitate the transition and explain how each employee can contribute to delivering customer-centric care is essential.
  3. Revamp cost structures: To be successful, CEOs and CMOs must deliver on two key priorities: keeping patients healthy and providing service at reasonable costs. This entails designing a fundamentally different operating model and driving down costs for activities that do not provide value – all while offering higher-quality care to their target population.
  4. Seek outside help when needed: Healthcare leaders might not always have the internal senior-level capacity and capability needed to accelerate change. Leveraging the help of an executive talent provider to ensure the organizations have the support and expertise to deliver a more customer-centric patient experience can make all the difference.

Meeting Demand for a New Level of Care

As the ACA has given more people greater access to healthcare—and more options in how they receive that care—healthcare leaders must rethink their current processes to deliver high quality care. If patients are unhappy, they can always switch to another provider. In this age of empowered patients and increased competition between providers, the CEO and CMO must communicate a transformative vision throughout their organizations. This starts with having qualified leadership at the top to guide these changes, the right technology to facilitate the processes and the best team to deliver on this goal. With these factors in place, healthcare organizations can deliver the customer-centric care necessary for success in today’s healthcare climate.


Nick Christiano

About the Author: Nick Christiano is responsible for the overall execution of the National Healthcare Practice for Tatum, a Randstad company. The Healthcare Practice provides executive leadership solutions to healthcare provider organizations, heath plans, private-equity backed bio-tech firms and affiliated organizations where subject matter expertise is critical to a successful client engagement. Christiano is recognized as a leader in the pursuit of optimum patient care, productivity, efficiencies, cost management and navigating new challenges in the healthcare field. He has an M.B.A. in MIS/Finance from the John Hagan School of Business – Iona College and a B.S. with a dual major in Computer Science/Electrical Engineering from N.Y.I.T.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Two-Thirds of Healthcare Organizations Report Remote Monitoring of Patients

December 17th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

A 2015 survey on telehealth and telemedicine practices determined that almost two-thirds of respondents remotely monitor patients, a spike in this telehealth application of about 6 percent since 2013.

Sixty-three percent of respondents to the Healthcare Intelligence Network's 2015 Telehealth & Telemedicine benchmarks study said they monitor patients remotely, with 67 percent of hospitals reporting they track patients in this manner.

The practice of remote monitoring ranked as the top clinical application of telehealth, followed by primary care e-visits (reported by 45 percent); specialty e-visits (31 percent) and health advice lines (26 percent).

Almost three-fourths of respondents to the 2015 survey expect the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to begin reimbursement for remote patient monitoring in the next 12 months.

Two-thirds of 2015 Telehealth & Telemedicine survey respondents monitor patients remotely.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine

Telehealth & Telemedicine

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Infographic: How Do We Fight Chronic Diseases?

December 16th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Chronic disease is the leading cause of death in the United States and accounts for a majority of our healthcare spending, according to a new infographic by eVisit.

The infographic looks at how to manage care for chronic care patients, including the use of telehealth.

Real-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation's (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients' A1C blood glucose levels.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Why Use Telemedicine in the ICU?

October 14th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

With the dramatic increase in the number of ICU patients in the United States, combined with a shortage of qualified ICU intensivists, many hospitals are turning to telemedicine to help monitor ICU patients.

A new infographic by Eagle Hospital Physicians shows how telemedicine is currently being used in the ICU along with the benefits of cost-savings and improved quality of care that hospitals and other healthcare facilities are realizing.

Why Use Telemedicine in the ICU?

The world of digitally enabled care is exploding: the number of patients using telehealth services will rise to 7 million in 2018, according to IHS Technology; healthcare apps and 'wearables' are trending in technology circles and healthcare providers' offices; and CMS's new 'Next Generation ACO' model is expected to favor expanded telehealth coverage.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

ACO Trends for Hospitals & Health Systems: 9 Metrics to Know

September 24th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Of all healthcare sectors, hospitals and health systems are the most engaged in ACO activity, with 72 percent belonging to an accountable care organization (ACO), versus 50 percent of overall respondents to the 2015 Accountable Care Organizations survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

Hospitals and health systems made a strong showing in HIN's fourth annual ACO activity and trends snapshot.

Moreover, respondents in this sector are united on many ACO fronts, reporting 100 percent commitment to the following: use of electronic health records (EHRs); inclusion of population health management and care coordination in their ACOs; adoption of NCQA guidelines for ACO recognition; review of clinical outcomes, health claims and health utilization data to measure ACO success; and designation of program rollout as the chief challenge of ACO creation.

And while not unanimous, hospital ACOs are almost twice as likely to be administered by a physician-hospital organization (60 percent, versus 28 percent overall); and to incorporate telehealth into their ACO framework (60 percent versus 34 percent overall).

This fourth comprehensive accountable care snapshot by the Healthcare Intelligence Network also found that ACOs within the hospital/health system sector, which comprised 11 percent of 2015 survey respondents, are twice as likely to employ 100 to 500 physicians (a metric reported by 60 percent of hospitals and health systems, versus 29 percent overall).

Also, hospitals have the largest number of pending ACOs, with half of those not already in an ACO expecting to be part of an ACO launch in the next twelve months, as compared to 25 percent overall.

Additionally, 40 percent of hospital-reported ACOs say they will participate in the Next Generation ACO Model, the latest Medicare Accountable Care Organization introduced by CMS, as compared to 21 percent of overall respondents, the survey found.

On the payment front, the hospital sector reports the highest use of a “fee for service + care coordination + shared savings” reimbursement model within their ACOs (60 percent versus 45 percent overall), the survey found.

Return on investment for hospital ACOs also tended to be healthier, with responding hospitals almost four times more likely to report ACO ROI between 3:1 and 4:1 (20 percent of hospitals versus 5 percent overall).

Finally, despite robust value-based activity, this sector expressed the most skepticism over CMS’s ability to shift half of Medicare payments to value-based models, with 71 percent doubting Medicare would meet this 2018 goal, versus 46 percent of responding healthcare organizations overall.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Accountable Care Organizations

Guest Post: Winning the Healthcare Revolution with Technology for Care Coordination, Collaboration & Communication

September 8th, 2015 by Richard Purcell, intelliSanté president & CEO

Healthcare is in the middle of a revolution. Health systems continue to integrate and expand, acquiring private practices and hospitals. Insurance carriers still navigate the Affordable Care Act, and merge to build actuarial risk pools. Providers deal with changing payment models, transitioning from traditional fee-for-service to merit-based incentive payments, though the exact definition of pay-for-performance is not yet codified. And in the midst of these radical changes, doctors, hospitals, and health systems are implementing an array of electronic medical records (EMRs) to finally replace paper records.

Two things are clear with all of this upheaval in the medical world: providers are frustrated, and the patient is nowhere to be found.

Doctors, nurses, and healthcare administrators are all under financial and workload pressures; they are trying to comply with healthcare IT requirements for meaningful use, and everyone is uncertain about the future. Patients are exasperated with figuring out insurance plans and in-network versus out-of-network provider coverage; obtaining medical records from their doctors is a challenge; and they are left to their own devices to navigate the complexities of the healthcare system.

Technology is the answer for healthcare transformation, but the entire healthcare ecosystem is a decade behind the information technology boom that has transformed every other industry.

6 Barriers to Health IT Integration

Why has it been difficult to bring technology to healthcare? Based on two years of interviewing dozens of stakeholders across the healthcare continuum, we can point to several reasons:

  • HIPAA, short for the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act passed in 1996 that legislates data privacy and security provisions designed to safeguard medical information.;
  • Reimbursement: Only this year and last has CMS provided CPT codes for care coordination, Chronic Care Management 99490 and Transitional Care Management 99495 and 99496. Shared savings models provide inconsistent results and are still largely undefined;
  • Limited investment: Providers already have invested heavily in EMRs, spending money and time on workflow management, and are therefore reluctant to add new workflows and software unless integrated with their current EMR systems, which are not built for patient-centric care coordination;
  • Technology proficiency: Medical personnel, especially physicians, are not broadly trained in technology and software other than the specific EMR in the practice or hospital, and that training is lagging. Patients, especially senior citizens, have widely varying and often negligible technology access and knowledge;
  • Data overload: There is so much unintegrated data from internal EMR and billing systems, claims forms, labs, and metabolic measures from myriad devices that no person can comprehend. Doctors and patients need clinically meaningful reports, not just data.
  • Transformation: The medical system has been trained and operated as a treatment-focused, fee-for-service business; that is how healthcare professionals earn their living. Population health management and the primary care medical home (PCMH) models of healthcare require a realignment of the provider-patient relationship, transformation of business focus from in-office visits to out-of-the-office management, new staff and resource allocation—all without a defined financial model for future practice.

What's Needed for a Patient-Centric Collaboration?

So, how in the current tumultuous environment can we ever achieve the Triple Aim of better health and improved care delivery at lower costs? The answer is patient-centric collaboration—working together to achieve a common outcome. But in order to make collaborative care work, we need patients, nurses, and doctors to embrace technology for collaboration. To this end, a new role in healthcare, the care coordinator, is the lynchpin to connecting patients to the healthcare system. Plus, an array of new and emerging software platforms like GetRealHealth and C3HealthLink for population health management can foster the personal communication necessary to engage patients outside the office environment, with the system-driven performance to drive efficiency.

Fortunately, the care coordinator position is currently being championed in several areas. For example, in New Jersey, Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield has promoted care coordination for many years by funding practices for on-site care coordinators. The PCMH movement embraces the care coordinator role and collaborative care, and The Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC), a not-for-profit trade group, is dedicated to healthcare transformation through primary care.

Plus there is hope on the patient technology front. According to the Pew Research Center, 64 percent of Americans own a smartphone, and for those seniors who do own smartphones, 82 percent describe the phone as “freeing." Plus, broadband access is expanding through initiatives like the recently announced ConnectHome Pilot Program that will bring Internet access to underserved areas.

4 Ways Technology Will Optimize Healthcare Delivery

Through technology, we can optimize care delivery if we can provide care coordinators and patients with the tools they need to engage in health, and systems that provide interconnected data exchange through the patient’s health record, enabling the following:

  • Patients to engage in health practices that promote adherence to medication schedules, self-monitoring, and care planning, together with HIPAA-compliant communications tools that foster responsibility and collaboration with a care team;
  • Medical practices to manage patient populations inside and outside of the healthcare system to optimize care coordination (treatment, transition, communication, monitoring), while establishing workflows for the impending reimbursement changes to pay for performance;
  • Health systems to establish new care coordination and data sharing models using cloud-based, HIPAA-compliant data exchange and communications channels that integrate clinically relevant data;
  • Payors to evaluate and measure patient engagement in health and provider practices for care coordination and collaborative care in order to reimburse providers for performance.

The challenges in healthcare are many, but we can emerge from this healthcare revolution with a stronger healthcare system through collaboration: with patients taking responsibility, providers communicating and sharing data, health systems funding new delivery models, and payors enabling a sustainable financial model that provides benefits to all stakeholders.


Richard Purcell

About the Author: Richard Purcell is president and chief executive officer of intelliSanté. He has played a lead role in founding the company, molding the corporate vision, and leading the commercial launch of C3HealthLink. Purcell has extensive experience in drug development, clinical data management, and business operations in a regulated environment. Previously, he was president of ClinPro, Inc., a mid-sized clinical research organization. In addition, he participated in the start-up of the medical Web site Medscape through sales and business development initiatives. Rich holds a B.S. in Biochemical Sciences from Princeton University, and attended Rutgers Graduate School of Management majoring in marketing and finance. He is an executive member of the Patient Centered Primary Care Collaborative (PCPCC), a member of the Licensing Executives Society, and an active member of the New Jersey Technology Council and HIMSS. (rich@intelliSanté.com)

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Infographic: Do People Trust Telemedicine?

August 21st, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Telemedicine could play a pivotal role in the ongoing efforts to improve access to healthcare services while reducing healthcare costs. Virtual, video-based doctor's appointments can help reduce the strain on general practitioners, and encourage preventative care. They also offer a cheaper, more-convenient alternative to in-person appointments, according to a new infographic by TechnologyAdvice Research.

The infographic highlights results from a TechnologyAdvice Research study, which sheds light on the current hesitations by healthcare consumers about video-based services, and the ways in which providers can better market their current offerings.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & TelemedicineThe world of digitally enabled care is exploding: the number of patients using telehealth services will rise to 7 million in 2018, according to IHS Technology; healthcare apps and 'wearables' are trending in technology circles and healthcare providers' offices; and CMS's new 'Next Generation ACO' model is expected to favor expanded telehealth coverage.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Telemedicine Comes of Age

July 20th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Sixty-seven percent of healthcare professionals use some form of telemedicine or plan to in the next few years, according to a new infographic by Vidyo.

The infographic looks at current telehealth trends, future projections and regulatory advances.

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care ManagementReal-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation's (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients' A1C blood glucose levels.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Integrating Behavioral Health & Primary Care: Colocation Breaks Down Patient Resistance

July 16th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Integration of behavioral health and primary care fosters 'warm handoffs' between providers.

Behavioral health conditions affect nearly one of five Americans, leading to healthcare costs of $57 billion yearly, notes a 2009 AHRQ brief. Integration of behavioral and physical health services helps to ensure access by all individuals to preventive, ongoing and appropriate behavioral health services as part of a whole-person healthcare approach.

According to 2015 metrics from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN), 62 percent of healthcare organizations have integrated behavioral health and primary care to some degree, with nearly one third—31 percent—reporting they have achieved “close collaboration onsite in a partly integrated system,” one of six integration levels defined by the Center for Integrative Health Solutions (CIHS).

The greatest benefit from integrated care is easy access to behavioral health providers, say numerous respondents to HIN’s 2015 survey on Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care. Their on-site presence facilitates everything from daily huddles of psychologists and primary care physicians for reviewing candidates for behavioral health interventions to warm hand-offs by doctors who schedule patients with behavioral health at the end of a primary care appointment.

Colocation also helps to break down patient resistance and reduce the stigma associated with seeking behavioral health services. One respondent stated the physical presence of a psychologist in the primary care office increased patients’ willingness to engage with a behavioral health professional.

When colocation isn’t possible, telehealth can help to fill the gaps. Twenty-one percent of respondents conduct behavioral health consults via telehealth.

“Psychiatrists and independently licensed practitioners are hard to find in our rural area,” said a respondent. “Telehealth is consistently used to meet demand, often with staff sitting in ‘live’ with the member.”

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Integrating Behavioral Health and Primary Care