Archive for the ‘Telehealth & Telemedicine’ Category

Infographic: Physician Telehealth Use

July 1st, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Some 57 percent of primary care physicians are willing to conduct a video visit with a patient, according to a new infographic by American Well.

The infographic examines why physicians want to conduct video visits, potential use of telehealth by physicians and the type of video consults physicians find most valuable.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine The world of digitally enabled care is exploding: the number of patients using telehealth services will rise to 7 million in 2018, according to IHS Technology; healthcare apps and 'wearables' are trending in technology circles and healthcare providers' offices; and CMS's new 'Next Generation ACO' model is expected to favor expanded telehealth coverage.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Telehealth, Wearables Tighten Provider-Patient Connection

June 16th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Remote monitoring of high-risk individuals engages patients in self-care of chronic illness.

It’s become a mantra in healthcare: “Meet patients where they are.”

The emergent field of telehealth helps to make this a reality. Almost two-thirds of respondents to this year's Telehealth and Telemedicine Survey have a direct connection to patients and health plan members in their homes via remote monitoring—a vital telehealth strategy for management of high-risk, high-cost populations that continues to surge in popularity.

Our fourth comprehensive Telehealth survey captured dozens of data points and trends, including how the use of ‘vintage’ tools like fax machines and land lines for telehealth delivery has given way to wireless and smart phone technologies patients carry on their person 24/7. Wireless telehealth applications jumped 13 percent in two years, respondents tell us, while telemedicine smart phone apps increased by 10 percent.

And let us not forget the wearables: 26 percent of healthcare respondents embrace this category of personal devices that are buckled or strapped onto the individuals whose care they manage and programmed to transmit health and fitness data. We can only speculate how the Apple® Watch, with its three rings that provide a visual snapshot of the wearer’s daily activity, will impact wearables metrics once the device debuts this summer.

High-tech obsessions and gadget-heads aside, telehealth live-streams care to populations needing it most: rural residents requiring specialist diagnostics but perhaps lacking the means or time to travel to the office of an orthopedist or a dermatologist, two specialties that participate in a groundbreaking multi-specialty telehealth collaborative in California.

Though telehealth faces a bandwidth worth of barriers, not the least of which are reimbursement and physician engagement, it’s exciting to visualize what this year’s respondents have in store for populations they serve. If the plans they shared come to fruition, telehealth in 2015 will variously link veterans, the mentally ill, women with high-risk pregnancies, pediatric patients and even employees at work sites to a hub of remote services designed to integrate care and boost population health outcomes.

Stay tuned.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine

Telehealth & Telemedicine

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

The Impact of Telemedicine: Infographic

June 5th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Telemedicine can result in fewer physician office and emergency room visits and provide a more convenient way for healthcare consumers to access the healthcare system, according to an EMI Health infographic.

The infographic examines the number of expected telehealth patients by 2018 and what's driving this trend.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & TelemedicineThe world of digitally enabled care is exploding: the number of patients using telehealth services will rise to 7 million in 2018, according to IHS Technology; healthcare apps and 'wearables' are trending in technology circles and healthcare providers' offices; and CMS's new 'Next Generation ACO' model is expected to favor expanded telehealth coverage.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Remote Care Management: Self-Monitoring Enhances Care Transitions

May 14th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Encouraged by reductions in hospital readmissions and almost universal patient satisfaction from its small remote patient monitoring pilot, CHRISTUS Health scaled up the initiative to more 170 participants. Luke Webster, MD, vice president and chief medical information officer for CHRISTUS Health, and Shannon Clifton, CHRISTUS director of connected care, describe the patient's responsibility in remote monitoring.

During the daily monitoring portion, the patient will do the daily self-care tasks. That includes their biometric readings, and answering questions related to their care plan, such as, how did they feel that day? Did they sleep well? Are they able to ambulate and get through their day normally or in good health? As long as they stay within those normal parameters, they will continue on with the daily monitoring and self-help management as they go.

Most patients monitor themselves in the morning, within 30 minutes of waking up. Some are directed to monitor themselves throughout the day depending on their risk: whether they’re low, medium, or moderate to high risk. That’s determined ahead of time by the nurse coach and/or the physician.

If for some reason there is an alert—such as a two- to three-pound weight gain, the patient’s not feeling well, or ran out of their prescription—any of those cues will alert the nurse that something has fallen outside that patient’s wellness parameters and their care plan. The nurse coach, at that time, will review all of the data; then the patient is called and the nurse coach will coach the patient back to their care plan.

We’ve had great success with that process; having all of that data has made the care transitions program more efficient, especially because the nurse coach has access to that day-to-day information; whereas before, our care transition program consisted of the nurse calling up to five times within 30 days.

Source: Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System

remote monitoring

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of a remote patient monitoring pilot by CHRISTUS Health. This 25-page report reviews the multi-state and international integrated delivery network's impressive early returns in cost of care, 30-day readmission rates and patient satisfaction from remote patient monitoring, as well as the challenges of program expansion.

Infographic: The Doctor Will “e-See” You Now

May 4th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

Eighty-four percent of people say their doctor's offices have a patient portal, according to a new survey commissioned by eClinicalWorks and conducted online by Harris Poll among over 2,000 U.S. adults, in March 2015.

Of those whose doctors do have a patient portal, adults age 55+ (61%) are more likely to access their health information via this tool than adults age 18-54 (45%).

eClinicalWorks® has released an infographic on the study results, which also examines wearable use, online patient scheduling and physician-patient communication via online portals.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & TelemedicineThe world of digitally enabled care is exploding: the number of patients using telehealth services will rise to 7 million in 2018, according to IHS Technology; healthcare apps and 'wearables' are trending in technology circles and healthcare providers' offices; and CMS's new 'Next Generation ACO' model is expected to favor expanded telehealth coverage.

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Overcoming ‘Clinical Inertia’ and 7 Other Barriers to Remote Patient Monitoring

February 26th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

It's important to identify potential barriers from both patients and providers before implementing a telehealth program, says Susan Lehrer, RN, CDE, associate executive director of the telehealth office for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (NYCHHC), because both groups need to change behaviors. Resistance to change is universal, and if you’re changing any kind of work flow or communication, there will be initial resistance.

  • Slow buy-in and some resistance by clinicians (referrals).
  • Clinicians concerned with appearance of decreased productivity.
  • Resistance to change in clinic work flow.
  • Inability to “integrate” Web site data and electronic medical records (EMRs).
  • Language and literacy.
  • Complexity of chronic disease management.
  • Lack of protocols for use of email in coordination of care.
  • Not all clinicians utilize secure email system.
  • Source: Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management

    http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Remote-Monitoring-of-High-Risk-Patients-Telehealth-Protocols-for-Chronic-Care-Management_p_5008.html

    Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation's (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients' A1C blood glucose levels. Susan Lehrer, RN, BSN, CDE, associate executive director of the telehealth office for NYCHHC, shares key aspects of the real-time monitoring program, including how the program blends telehealth, electronic medical records, electronic communication with providers and direct communication with patients by nurse case managers, and much more.

    Infographic: Telemedicine Market Growth

    February 20th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

    Telemedicine is one of the fastest growing sectors in healthcare, according to a new infographic by MANA. With increased pressure for healthcare cost efficiency and cost reduction, this growth is expected to accelerate.

    The MANA infographic compares the telehealth market in 2010 and expectations for 2016, along with expected growth rates for home-based and hospital-based telehealth technology.

    Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care ManagementReal-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

    Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation's (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients' A1C blood glucose levels.

    Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

    Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

    6 Health Plan Trends in Remote Patient Monitoring

    February 12th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

    CHF and COPD are the health conditions most frequently targeted by health plan remote monitoring programs.

    Frequent emergency room users, individuals with chronic comorbidities and members recently discharged from the hospital are the populations most often monitored remotely by health plans, according to 2014 market data.

    Payors comprised 16 percent of respondents to the Healthcare Intelligence Network's 2014 survey on remote patient monitoring.

    The survey identified the following payor trends in remote care management:

    • Forty percent of health plans said they had a remote monitoring program in place, versus a high of 64 percent for case management and a low of 24 percent for hospital/health systems.
    • Health plans principally rely on case management assessments to identify remote monitoring candidates (80 percent) a fraction more than case management organizations themselves (78 percent). They were also most likely to depend upon direct member/patient referrals—a high of 44 percent versus a low of 0 percent for health plans and a median of 25 percent for hospital/health systems.
    • Health plans were most likely to monitor frequent hospital/ER utilizers remotely (100 percent) versus a low of 55 percent for case management and a median of 75 percent for hospital/health systems. They were also most likely to monitor those patients recently discharged (80 percent) versus a low of 44 percent for case management and a median of 50 percent for hospital/health systems.
    • Of the top five chronic diseases monitored by remote technologies (CHF, COPD, asthma, hypertension, and stroke), health plans were most likely to monitor CHF (100 percent versus a low of 25 percent for hospital/health systems and a median of 89 percent for case management); COPD (100 percent versus a low of 50 percent for hospital/health systems and a median of 67 percent for case management); and asthma (80 percent versus a low of 44 percent for case management and a median of 50 percent for hospital/health systems.
    • In terms of payor challenges associated with remote monitoring, patient education was a strong concern (60 percent) versus a low of 25 percent for hospitals/health systems and a median of 56 percent for case management, as was reliability of self-reported data (60 percent) versus a low of 25 percent for hospitals/health systems and a median of 44 percent for case management.
    • Across the board, all three sectors (100 percent) said telephonic case management was key to remote monitoring.

    Source: 2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring

    Infographic: Telehealth Index

    January 28th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

    Sixty-four percent of Americans would be willing to have a physician visit over a video platform, according to a new survey conducted by Harris on behalf of American Well.

    An infographic by American Well drills down into the survey results, including details on consumer perceptions of telehealth.

    Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care ManagementReal-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

    Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation's (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients' A1C blood glucose levels.

    Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

    Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

    14 Protocols to Enhance Healthcare Home Visits

    January 20th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

    Use of telemonitoring equipment, electronic medical records (EMRs), a staff dedicated to monitoring home visits and engaged caregivers are just some of the protocols used to enhance home visits, according to 155 respondents to the Healthcare Intelligence Network’s most recent industry survey on home visits.

    Following are 10 more protocols used to improve the home visit process:

    • Inclusion of home visiting physician in hospital rounds; and the collaboration of home visit physician with primary care physician (PCP) and complex case managers.
    • Using our medication management machines with skilled nursing follow-up to increase medication compliance.
    • Proactive phone calls to determine if a patient's condition is worsening and in need of home visits.
    • Daily workflow management algorithms with prioritization and mobile access to electronic case management records.
    • Using teach-back to assure comprehension.
    • Easy to use/wear multimodal, advanced diagnostics telemonitoring allowing patients total mobility and continuous real-time monitoring.
    • Medication reconciliation is crucial in eliminating confusion for the patient, and our electronic medical record (EMR) accurately reflects what the patient is taking, including over-the-counter (OTC) and supplements.
    • Hospital coach gathers information and prepares the patient for discharge, coordinates with home visit staff, home visit team (coach and mobile physician) and completes home visit.
    • Portable EMR to document and review medical information on the spot.
    • EHR-generated lists, community-based team, community Web-based tracking tool, telehome monitoring devices, preferred provider network with skilled nursing facility/long-term acute care (SNF/LTAC), home health and infusion therapy.

    Source: 2013 Healthcare Benchmarks: Home Visits

    http://hin.3dcartstores.com/2013-Healthcare-Benchmarks-Home-Visits_p_4713.html

    2013 Healthcare Benchmarks: Home Visits examines the latest trends in home visits for medical purposes, from the populations visited to top health tasks performed in the home to results and ROI from home interventions.