Archive for the ‘Social Determinants of health’ Category

HINfographic: During Annual Wellness Visit, Screen for Social Health Determinants

June 12th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Seventy percent of health outcomes are determined by social determinants of health­—areas that involve an individual's social and environmental condition as well as experiences that directly impact health and health status, according to the Pew Research Center in its report, Chronic Disease and the Internet.

A new infographic by HIN examines the impact of SDOH on health status, why the Medicare annual visit is an ideal time to screen for SDOH and the correlation between technology and social isolation.

The move from fee-for-service to value-based healthcare is driving the need for increased capabilities in population health management, including addressing all of the areas that may impact a person's health. There is growing recognition that a broad range of social, economic and environmental factors shape an individual's health, according to the New England Journal of Medicine. In fact, 60 percent of premature deaths are due to either individual behaviors or social and environmental factors. Healthcare providers who adopt value-based reimbursement models have an economic interest in all of the factors that impact a person's health and providers must develop new skills and data gathering capabilities and forge community partnerships to understand and impact these factors.

During Social Determinants and Population Health: Moving Beyond Clinical Data in a Value-Based Healthcare System, a December 8th webinar, now available for replay, Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer, Pharos Innovations, shares his insight on the opportunity available to providers to impact population health beyond traditional clinical factors.

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HINfographic: Social Determinants of Health: Screenings Abound, But Support Services Scarce

April 26th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Social determinants of health like food insecurity, unsafe neighborhoods and even loneliness can impact quality of life and population health. Although more than two-thirds of healthcare organizations now screen populations for social determinants of health (SDOH) as part of ongoing care management, one-third are challenged by a lack of supportive services, according to the December 2016 SDOH survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

A new infographic by HIN examines priority populations for SDOH screening, the greatest SDOH need and SDOH integration and tools.

2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Social Determinants of HealthInitiatives such as CMS' Accountable Health Communities Model and other population health platforms encourage healthcare organizations to tackle the broad range of social, economic and environmental factors that shape an individual's health. To underscore the need to address social determinants of health, Healthy People 2020 included "Create social and physical environments that promote good health for all" among its four overarching goals for the decade.

In one measure of their impact, 2015 research by Brigham Young University found that the social determinants of loneliness and social isolation are just as much a threat to longevity as obesity.

2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Social Determinants of Health documents the efforts of more than 140 healthcare organizations to assess social, economic and environmental factors in patients and to begin to redesign care management to account for these factors.

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Touting ‘Magic’ of Home Visits, Sun Health Dispels 5 Care Transition Management Myths

April 4th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan


With an average of 299 warm, sunny days a year, Phoenix is a mecca for senior transplants. However, as Phoenix-based Sun Health knows well, when an aging population relocates far from their adult children, there's a danger that if some of them experience cognitive decline or other health issues, no one will notice.

That's one reason home visits are the cornerstone of Sun Health's Care Transitions Management program. Visiting recently discharged patients at home not only tracks the individual's progress with the hospitalization-related condition, but also pinpoints any social determinants of health (SDOH) that inhibit optimum health.

"There are a number of social determinants of health that, if not addressed, could adversely impact the medical issue," explains Jennifer Drago, FACHE, executive vice president of population health for the Arizona non-profit organization. Ms. Drago outlined the program during A Leading Care Transitions Model: Addressing Social Health Determinants Through Targeted Home Visits, a March 2017 webinar now available for replay.

Identifying social determinants of health (SDOH) such as medication affordability, transportation, health literacy and social isolation are so important to Sun Health that SDOHs form the critical fifth pillar of its Care Transitions Program. Modeled on the Coleman Care Transitions Intervention®, SDOH identification and support balance Coleman's four pillars of education, medication reconciliation, physician follow-up visits, and personalized plan of care.

The belief that organizations can effectively execute transitions of care programs pre-discharge or by phone only is one of five care transition myths Ms. Drago dispelled during the webinar. "You will have an impact [with phone calls], but it won't be as great as a program incorporating dedicated staff and that home visit. I can't tell you the magic that happens in a home visit."

That "magic" contributed to Sun Health's stellar performance in CMS's recently concluded Community-Based Care Transitions Program demonstration. Sun Health was the national demo's top performer, achieving a 56 percent reduction in Medicare 30-day readmissions—from 17.8 percent to 7.81 percent—as compared to the 14.5 percent readmission rate of other demonstration participants.

Sun Health's multi-stepped intervention begins with a visit to the patient's hospital bedside. "Patients are a captive audience while in the hospital," explained Ms. Drago. That scripted bedside encounter, which boosted patients' receptivity to the program, addresses not only the reason for the hospitalization (hip replacement, for example) but also co-occuring chronic conditions, she continued.

"The thing that will have the greatest chance of going out of whack or out of sync in their recovery period is their chronic disease, because they're probably not eating the same, they're more sedentary, and their medications likely have been disrupted."

Ms. Drago went on to present some of the intervention's tools, including care plans, daily patient check-ins, and the science behind her organization's care transitions scripts.

After sharing six key lessons learned from care transitions management, Ms. Drago noted that while her organization participated as a mission-based endeavor, others could model Sun Health's intervention and benefit from those readmissions savings. She also shared a video on the Sun Health Care Transitions Program:

Listen to an interview with Jennifer Drago on the science behind care transition management.

Social Determinants of Health: Does Technology Connect or Isolate?

January 12th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan
social isolation

Only half of Americans with two or more chronic conditions actually go online.

Social determinants are areas of health that involve an individual’s social and environmental condition as well as experiences that directly impact health and health status. Here, Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer, Pharos Innovations, examines why, contrary to popular thought, technology advances may actually increase the gap between social connectedness and social isolation for certain populations.

In the age of the Internet, technology itself may become a barrier to being connected with others through social interactions. The Pew Research Center has done some nice work on health and the Internet. It turns out that three quarters of adults in the United States go online. That's probably not all that surprising, but what's more nuanced in this data is that the Internet access of individuals in the United States actually differs, depending on whether or not those individuals suffer from chronic health conditions.

It turns out that of Americans who have two or more chronic conditions, which by the way represents the vast majority of the Medicare population, only half go online. As it turns out, the very same groups that suffer most from social determinants of health, and not just from social isolation, also have the highest rates of chronic disease. And according to this research, they are the ones most likely to NOT have access to the Internet. This is called the Internet Divide.

We might be encouraged by the prevalence and penetration of mobile technologies, and maybe those would be the great bridge over the Internet Divide. Unfortunately, that may not be the case yet. According to this same Pew research, 90 percent of Americans who don't have a chronic condition actually own a cellphone. However, if you do have two or more chronic conditions, that number drops down pretty dramatically to 70 percent. That finding is a bit better than Internet access, but certainly not ubiquitous. If you look at those who have a cellphone, only 23 percent of them actually access text-messaging technologies on their cellphones, and smartphone apps fall well below that.

Source: Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services

social determinants of health

In Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services, care teams will learn that by asking patients the right questions and listening carefully to their responses, they can begin to identify and address social determinants, dramatically impacting patient outcomes as well as their own financial success under value-based care.

Infographic: Social Determinants of Health

January 9th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Health IT data platforms and delivery systems are increasingly including social determinants of health into population health management goals, and many public-private initiatives are advancing and fine-tuning ways to gauge impact and improvement, according to a new infographic by Philips Wellcentive.

While addressing social determinants of health is an effective strategy to impact population health, it requires focused collaboration. The infographic details six promising examples of current programs and stakeholders.

Social Determinants of Health

Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical ServicesAlthough nearly three-fourths of health outcomes are determined by social determinants, few clinicians can ably identify those patients facing challenges related to social and environmental conditions or other experiences that directly impact health and health status.

In Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services, care teams will learn that by asking patients the right questions and listening carefully to their responses, they can begin to identify and address social determinants, dramatically impacting patient outcomes as well as their own financial success under value-based care.

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Use Annual Wellness Visit to Screen for Social Determinants of Health in High-Risk Medicare Population

December 13th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

The social determinant of social isolation carries the same health risk as smoking, and double that of obesity.

With about a third of health outcomes determined by human behavior choices, according to a Robert Wood Johnson Foundation study, improving population health should be as straightforward as fostering healthy behaviors in patients and health plan members.

But what's unstated in that data point is that the remaining 70 percent of health outcomes are determined by social determinants of health—areas that involve an individual's social and environmental condition as well as experiences that directly impact health and health status.

By addressing social determinants, healthcare organizations can dramatically impact patient outcomes as well as their own financial success under value-based care, advised Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer, Pharos Innovations, during Social Determinants and Population Health: Moving Beyond Clinical Data in a Value-Based Healthcare System, a December 2016 webinar now available for replay.

"The challenge is that few healthcare systems are currently equipped to identify individuals within their populations who have social determinant challenges," said Dr. Williams, "And few are still are structured to coordinate both medical and nonmedical support needs."

The Medicare annual wellness visit is an ideal opportunity to screen beneficiaries for social determinants—particularly rising and high-risk patients, who frequently face a higher percentage of social determinant challenges.

Primary social determinants include the individual's access to healthcare, their socio- and economic conditions, and factors related to their living environment such as air or water quality, availability of food, and transportation.

Dr. Williams presented several patient scenarios illustrating key social determinants, including social isolation, in which individuals, particularly the elderly, are lonely, lack companionship and frequently suffer from depression. "Social isolation carries the same health risk as smoking and double that of obesity," he said.

While technology is useful in reducing social isolation, studies by the Pew Research Center determined that segments of the population with the highest percentage of chronic illness tend to be least connected to the Internet or even to mobile technologies.

"Accountable care organizations (ACOs) and other organizations managing populations must continue to push technology-enhanced care models," said Dr. Williams, "But they also have to understand and assess technology barriers and inequalities in their populations, especially among those with chronic conditions."

In another patient scenario, loss of transportation severely hampered an eighty-year-old woman's ability to complete physical rehabilitation following a knee replacement.

Dr. Williams then described multiple approaches for healthcare organizations to begin to address social determinants in population health, including patients' cultural biases, which may make them more or less open to specific care options. This fundamental care redesign should include an environmental assessment to catalog available social and community resources, he said, providing several examples.

"This is not the kind of information you're going to find in a traditional electronic health record or even care management platforms," he concluded.

Infographic: The Impact of Social Determinants on Health

July 6th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

A range of personal, social, economic and environmental factors contribute to individual and population health, according to a new infographic by Healthy People 2020.

The infographic examines high school graduation rates by ethnicity/race and the impact of a quality education on health.

When success in a fee-for-value reimbursement framework calls for a care coordination vision focused on the highest-risk, highest-cost patients, an organization must be able to identify this critical population.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Stratifying High-Risk Patients captures the latest tools and practices employed by healthcare organizations across the care continuum as they risk-stratify patients and health plan members in preparation for care management.

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