Archive for the ‘Remote Monitoring’ Category

Infographic: Technology and the 21st-Century Medicine Bag

March 6th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

The traditional clinician's medicine bag is now a thing of the past, but its replacement promises to be even more useful as a means of facilitating better patient care, according to a new infographic by Transcend Insight. Now, a doctor's visit is facilitated via laptop or with a smartphone -- technologies and products of healthcare innovation.

Healthcare innovation, in fact, is transforming everything from how physicians diagnose and treat their patients to how healthcare systems are reimbursed for their services. Here’s a quick look at how that transformation is unfolding, and how four key technologies in particular have become critical components of modern-day medicine.

Technology and the 21st-Century Medicine Bag

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

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Infographic: Is Your Health System Ready for Virtual Healthcare?

December 5th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Consumer preference, increased health system adoption, and health benefit coverage are driving growth in virtual care in the healthcare industry, according to a new infographic by Zipnosis. Health systems need virtual care to compete—both now and in the future.

The infographic examines the drivers of this shift to virtual care and what the future holds.

Is Your Health System Ready for Virtual Healthcare?

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today. Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Waking up with Healthcare’s Internet of Things in 2040

June 24th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

By the year 2040, anything and everything that can be tagged with a wireless identifier will probably have one (or more). Tiny, wireless electronic devices that are attached to an object to connect it to the Internet of Things. Wireless identifier may be too restricting of a name...by that time, these devices could do a lot more than just identify an object, they could relay data on size, shape and location or receive instructions on what to do next. These devices might be powered by light, motion, radio waves, biopower or some other means. Bigger devices control the smaller ones, and they all talk together, according to a new infographic by FutureforAll.

The infographic examines what the Internet of Things for healthcare applications might be like in the year 2040.

Relieving the Costs and Consequences of Chronic Pain: A Best Practice Multimodal Approach The financial, physical and emotional toll of pain on the United States is excruciating, but Relieving the Costs and Consequences of Chronic Pain: A Best Practice Multimodal Approach offers an antidote for the 25 percent of Americans suffering daily from chronic or persistent pain and the healthcare organizations that treat them. Featuring contributions from two of pain management's foremost experts, this special report offers multi-faceted strategies in pain assessment and management to improve quality of life for the chronic pain patient, reducing healthcare utilization in the process.

In this 35-page report, Marilee I. Donovan, Ph.D., R.N., regional pain management coordinator, Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and Cheryl Pacella, D.N.P., R.N., performance improvement advisor at MassPro, describe patient-centric pain management tactics that engage the patient as an active partner and employ creative and alternative therapies and interventions.

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Can Digital Health Drive Down Diabetes Costs?

April 14th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

The majority of organizations engage in digital health to enhance patient satisfaction with their healthcare experience, according to March 2016 HIN market metrics.

New metrics from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN) have determined that 58 percent of digital health initiatives target patients with diabetes, the global cost of which is now $825 billion per year, according to a new report from the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Harvard, the World Health Organization and nearly 500 researchers around the globe recently conducted the largest-ever worldwide study of diabetes levels.

Respondents to the February 2016 Digital Health Survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network report that, along with the diabetes population, individuals with congestive heart failure and hypertension are also closely monitored by digital health programs.

Weight and vital signs, key indicators that can signal complications with diabetes and other chronic conditions, are the health activities most frequently monitored by digital health, said 63 percent of survey respondents, a trend Melanie Matthews, HIN executive vice president and chief operating officer, would like to see expanded.

"In our device-driven era, many individuals already use at least one electronic tool for health-related reasons. Coaching people to use digital health to monitor vital signs like weight and blood pressure will foster self-management." And with chronic conditions held in check, the industry should see a drop in hospital utilization and associated cost, Ms. Matthews predicted.

Digital health, also called ‘connected health,’ leverages technology to identify, track and manage patients' health problems.

The survey also identified these digital health trends:

  • Individuals at moderate risk for hospitalization are the most engaged in digital health, said one-quarter of respondents.
  • Seventy percent said the principal goal of digital health is to elevate patient satisfaction with the healthcare experience.
  • Individuals at risk of a health crisis or hospital admission are the most heavily invested in digital health, according to one-quarter of respondents.
  • Mobile and tablet apps are the front-running digital health platforms, say 78 percent of these respondents, with online health education the principal digital health activity for 58 percent.
  • Overall, patient engagement proves the biggest digital health hurdle to overcome, say 23 percent of respondents.

For more 2016 digital health metrics, download the Digital Health Survey executive summary.

Infographic: UnitedHealthcare Gives Incentives for Wearable Device Use

March 16th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

UnitedHealthcare and Qualcomm Incorporated, through its wholly owned subsidiary Qualcomm Life, Inc., are collaborating on a new wellness program, UnitedHealthcare Motion™, that provides employees with wearable devices at no additional charge and enables them to earn up to $1,460 per year by meeting certain goals for the number of daily steps.

The device, examined in a new infographic by UnitedHealthcare, not only tracks the total number of steps, but also tabulates the total number, frequency and intensity of the steps taken, providing a more accurate and comprehensive summary of the user's daily activity. Employees can earn Health Reimbursement Account credits that can total up to $1,460 per year, while employers can obtain premium savings based on program participants' combined results.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital HealthDigital health, also referred to as 'connected health,' leverages technology to help identify, track and manage health problems and challenges faced by patients. Person-centric health management is slowly acknowledging the device-driven lives of patients and health plan members and incorporating these tools into care delivery and management efforts.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital Health examines program goals, platforms, components, development strategies, target populations and health conditions, patient engagement metrics, results and challenges reported by healthcare organizations responding to the February 2016 Digital Health survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

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Two-Thirds of Healthcare Organizations Report Remote Monitoring of Patients

December 17th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

A 2015 survey on telehealth and telemedicine practices determined that almost two-thirds of respondents remotely monitor patients, a spike in this telehealth application of about 6 percent since 2013.

Sixty-three percent of respondents to the Healthcare Intelligence Network's 2015 Telehealth & Telemedicine benchmarks study said they monitor patients remotely, with 67 percent of hospitals reporting they track patients in this manner.

The practice of remote monitoring ranked as the top clinical application of telehealth, followed by primary care e-visits (reported by 45 percent); specialty e-visits (31 percent) and health advice lines (26 percent).

Almost three-fourths of respondents to the 2015 survey expect the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to begin reimbursement for remote patient monitoring in the next 12 months.

Two-thirds of 2015 Telehealth & Telemedicine survey respondents monitor patients remotely.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine

Telehealth & Telemedicine

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Infographic: Delivering Quality Care Through Remote Patient Monitoring

September 30th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

With remote patient monitoring, patients can share vital healthcare information using mobile devices at anytime from anywhere.

A new infographic from Vigyanix looks at expected growth in the remote patient monitoring market, the major players in the remote monitoring space, how remote patient monitoring can be used to improve healthcare delivery and the barriers to implementation.

Delivering Quality Care Through Remote Patient Monitoring

Recent market data on telehealth in general and the patient-centered medical home in particular identified home health monitoring as a key care coordination strategy for individuals with complex illnesses as well as a host of vulnerable populations.

2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Remote Patient Monitoring delivers a comprehensive set of metrics from more than 100 healthcare organizations on current practices in and ramifications of remote monitoring for care management of chronic illness, the frail elderly and remote populations.

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Telehealth, Wearables Tighten Provider-Patient Connection

June 16th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Remote monitoring of high-risk individuals engages patients in self-care of chronic illness.

It’s become a mantra in healthcare: “Meet patients where they are.”

The emergent field of telehealth helps to make this a reality. Almost two-thirds of respondents to this year's Telehealth and Telemedicine Survey have a direct connection to patients and health plan members in their homes via remote monitoring—a vital telehealth strategy for management of high-risk, high-cost populations that continues to surge in popularity.

Our fourth comprehensive Telehealth survey captured dozens of data points and trends, including how the use of ‘vintage’ tools like fax machines and land lines for telehealth delivery has given way to wireless and smart phone technologies patients carry on their person 24/7. Wireless telehealth applications jumped 13 percent in two years, respondents tell us, while telemedicine smart phone apps increased by 10 percent.

And let us not forget the wearables: 26 percent of healthcare respondents embrace this category of personal devices that are buckled or strapped onto the individuals whose care they manage and programmed to transmit health and fitness data. We can only speculate how the Apple® Watch, with its three rings that provide a visual snapshot of the wearer’s daily activity, will impact wearables metrics once the device debuts this summer.

High-tech obsessions and gadget-heads aside, telehealth live-streams care to populations needing it most: rural residents requiring specialist diagnostics but perhaps lacking the means or time to travel to the office of an orthopedist or a dermatologist, two specialties that participate in a groundbreaking multi-specialty telehealth collaborative in California.

Though telehealth faces a bandwidth worth of barriers, not the least of which are reimbursement and physician engagement, it’s exciting to visualize what this year’s respondents have in store for populations they serve. If the plans they shared come to fruition, telehealth in 2015 will variously link veterans, the mentally ill, women with high-risk pregnancies, pediatric patients and even employees at work sites to a hub of remote services designed to integrate care and boost population health outcomes.

Stay tuned.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine

Telehealth & Telemedicine

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.

Remote Care Management: Self-Monitoring Enhances Care Transitions

May 14th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Encouraged by reductions in hospital readmissions and almost universal patient satisfaction from its small remote patient monitoring pilot, CHRISTUS Health scaled up the initiative to more 170 participants. Luke Webster, MD, vice president and chief medical information officer for CHRISTUS Health, and Shannon Clifton, CHRISTUS director of connected care, describe the patient's responsibility in remote monitoring.

During the daily monitoring portion, the patient will do the daily self-care tasks. That includes their biometric readings, and answering questions related to their care plan, such as, how did they feel that day? Did they sleep well? Are they able to ambulate and get through their day normally or in good health? As long as they stay within those normal parameters, they will continue on with the daily monitoring and self-help management as they go.

Most patients monitor themselves in the morning, within 30 minutes of waking up. Some are directed to monitor themselves throughout the day depending on their risk: whether they’re low, medium, or moderate to high risk. That’s determined ahead of time by the nurse coach and/or the physician.

If for some reason there is an alert—such as a two- to three-pound weight gain, the patient’s not feeling well, or ran out of their prescription—any of those cues will alert the nurse that something has fallen outside that patient’s wellness parameters and their care plan. The nurse coach, at that time, will review all of the data; then the patient is called and the nurse coach will coach the patient back to their care plan.

We’ve had great success with that process; having all of that data has made the care transitions program more efficient, especially because the nurse coach has access to that day-to-day information; whereas before, our care transition program consisted of the nurse calling up to five times within 30 days.

Source: Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System

remote monitoring

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of a remote patient monitoring pilot by CHRISTUS Health. This 25-page report reviews the multi-state and international integrated delivery network's impressive early returns in cost of care, 30-day readmission rates and patient satisfaction from remote patient monitoring, as well as the challenges of program expansion.

CHRISTUS Remote Patient Monitoring Challenge: Balancing Mission and Margin in Fee-Based World

March 5th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

CHRISTUS Health recently expanded its remote patient monitoring program from 24 to 170 participants.


In its initial months of coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health nearly halved participants' average cost of care, experienced no 30-day readmissions, and realized a 100 percent patient satisfaction rating.

Now, having expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients, the challenge for the multi-state and international integrated delivery network is scaling up RPM technology while balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with the financial fallout of keeping reimbursed patients out of the hospital in a largely fee-for-service environment.

"As a faith-based system, we are very passionate about keeping patients healthy and keeping them at the less restrictive, least risk environment. However, we also have to make sure our revenue stream is sufficient so that we keep our doors open," noted Dr. Luke Webster, chief medical information officer for CHRISTUS Health during Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management, a February 24, 2015 webinar now available for replay.

Dr. Webster was joined by Shannon Clifton, director of connected care for CHRISTUS Health, who described the daily RPM program's eligibility criteria and clinical workflow process as well as its clinical, financial and quality benefits.

Constructed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitored kit sent home at hospital discharge, the RPM initiative is now supported by a team of six care transition nurses, up from a single nurse at the program's outset, Ms. Clifton explained.

Other program elements include in-hospital kit delivery and patient education, as well as nurse coach monitoring following the patient's return home.

Participants, who are identified via CHRISTUS's care transition program, self-monitor key biometrics. A nurse coach responds to any alerts, coaching the patient back within wellness parameters and alerting the primary care physician if necessary to further engage the patient.

Patients remain in the program for up to 60 days. There are now 100 RPM kits in circulation, up from the initial ten in the program's first phase.

While patient satisfaction remains high—98 percent currently in the expanded phase—CHRISTUS must also contend with the uncertainty of mobile health and a degree of provider skepticism and resistance. Another RPM-related hurdle is the additional workload it creates for care transition nurses.

With the support of its CFO, CHRISTUS Health is exploring options to optimize its RPM investment, including advocacy for expanded telehealth reimbursement; RPM subscription options for 'the worried well' who would pay for the monitoring; and development of a centralized e-hub, among other ideas.

Listen to Shannon Clifton describe the critical stage of the 60-day program that strives to keep high-risk patients within wellness parameters.