Archive for the ‘Patient Engagement’ Category

18 Success Strategies from Seasoned Healthcare Case Managers for New Hires

September 14th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

Advice from case management trenches: “Don’t do more work for your patient than they are willing to do for themselves.”

What does it take to succeed as a healthcare case manager? For starters, patience, flexibility and mastery of motivational interviewing, say veterans from case management trenches.

As part of its 2017 Healthcare Benchmarks Survey on Case Management, the Healthcare Intelligence Network asked experienced case managers what guidance they would offer to new hires in the field. Respondents were thoughtful and generous with their advice, highlights of which are shared here.

It’s important to note that in total, a half dozen veterans identified motivational interviewing as an essential case management skill.

We hope you find these tips useful. We invite all experienced case managers to add your tips in the Comments below.

  • “It’s hard work but satisfying. It takes a good year to get all resources and process, so don’t give up.”
  • “Learn the integrated case management model and get ongoing coaching in motivational interviewing.”
  • “Listen, think, develop, coordinate, adhere to plan benefits, and be honest.”
  • “Communicating and developing a relationship with members are key.”
  • “Be aware of and utilize telemedicine.”
  • “Be prepared to help patients with non-medical matters. Develop a trust bond, almost as a family member, and your medical-focused concerns will be that much easier to handle.”
  • “Always remain flexible. Listen and meet the patient where they are at in their disease and life process.”
  • “Understand both the clinical and financial impacts of healthcare on the patient.”
  • “Establish a good working relationship with your manager. Ensure you understand job expectations and identify a mentor.”
  • “Time management is crucial.”
  • “Stay visible within the practice; interact regularly with the care team; share examples of success stories.”
  • “Compassion and empathy are a must.”
  • “Don’t become overwhelmed by all that needs to be learned. Strive for sure and steady progress in gaining the knowledge needed.”
  • “Don’t let a fear of the unknown hold you back. Learn all that you can.”
  • “Get a good understanding of the population of patients you are working with. Study motivational interviewing and harm reduction.”
  • “This is a wide body of knowledge. Each case is different. It takes six months to a year to be fully comfortable in the practice.”
  • “Establish boundaries with your patients, and don’t do more work for your patient than they are willing to do for themselves.”
  • “Earn the trust of your patients and providers. LISTEN to your patients.”

One respondent geared her advice to case management hiring managers:

  • “Hire for coaching mentality and chronic disease experience.”

Excerpted From: 2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Case Management

2017 case management benchmarks

2017 Healthcare Benchmarks: Case Management provides actionable information from 78 healthcare organizations on the role of case management in the healthcare continuum, from targeted populations and conditions to the advantages and challenges of embedded case management to CM hiring and evaluation standards. Assessment of case management ROI and impact on key care components are also provided.

PinnacleHealth Engagement Coaches Score Points with High-Risk Patients, Win Over Clinicians

September 7th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

PinnacleHealth’s targeted outreach, 24/7 nurse advice line and clinician coaching have helped to bring chronic disease high utilizers back to care.

A dual engagement strategy by PinnacleHealth System that recruits both patients and providers is scoring significant gains in CAHPS® scores, clinical indicators in high risk patients, and the provision of health-literate care.

Kathryn Shradley, director of population health for PinnacleHealth System, outlined her organization’s patient engagement playbook during A Two-Pronged Patient Engagement Strategy: Closing Gaps in Care and Coaching Clinicians, an August 2017 webcast now available from the Healthcare Intelligence Network training suite.

The winning framework? Focused outreach and health coaching for high-risk, high utilizers that break down barriers to care, and a patient engagement coach to advise PinnacleHealth clinicians on the art of activating patients in self-management.

PinnacleHealth’s engagement approach, aligned with its population health strategies and based on the Health Literate Care Model, began in its ambulatory and primary care arenas. Before any coaching began, the health system schooled its staff on the value of health literacy. “Moving to a climate of patient engagement is nothing short of a culture change for many of our clinicians,” said Ms. Shradley.

To foster leadership buy-in, PinnacleHealth also strove to demonstrate bottom-line benefits of patient engagement, including lowered costs and staff turnover and increased standing in the community.

Then, having combed its registry to identify about 1,900 chronic disease patients most in need of engagement, the health system hired a health maintenance outreach coordinator who built outreach and coaching pilots designed to break down barriers to care. At the end of the six-month pilot, higher engagement and lower A1C levels were noted in more than half of these patients. For the 23 percent that remained disengaged, the outreach coordinator dug a little deeper, uncovering additional social health determinants like transportation they could address with more intensive coaching and even home visits.

At the same time, a new 24/7 nurse advice line staffed with PinnacleHealth employees continued that coaching support when the health coach was not available.

Complementing this patient outreach is a patient engagement coach, a public health-minded non-clinician that guides PinnacleHealth providers in the use of tools like motivational interviewing and teach-back during patient visits to kindle engagement.

“The engagement coach does a great job of standing at the elbow with our providers in a visit, outside of a visit, surrounding a visit, to talk about what life looks like from the patient side of view.”

Providers and staff receive one to two direct coaching sessions each year, with additional coaching available as needed.

With other elements of its patient engagement approach yet to be implemented, PinnacleHealth has observed encouraging improvements in HCAHPS scores for at least one practice that received coaching over seven months. It has also learned that by educating nurses on health-literate care interventions, it could increase HCAHPS communication scores.

Listen to an interview with Kathryn Shradley: PinnacleHealth’s Patient Engagement Coach for Clinicians: Supportive Peer at Provider’s Elbow.

Food for Thought: Nutrition Programs Reduce Hospital Visits and Readmissions by Vulnerable Populations

August 18th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

Malnutrition is a social determinant of health that negatively impacts health outcomes.

It’s a difficult statistic to digest: one in three people enter the hospital malnourished or at risk of malnutrition, a state that impacts their recovery and increases their risk of health complications and rehospitalizations.

Two studies this week highlight the clinical benefits of addressing patients’ nutrition needs before and during hospital stays as well as savings that can result from identification of social determinants of health (SDOH) like access to nutrition that drive 85 percent of health outcomes.

In the first, a study of elderly Maryland residents by Benefits Data Trust, a national nonprofit based in Philadelphia, found that when it comes to low-income seniors, access to quality food via food stamps can also save money by reducing the number and duration of hospital visits and nursing home admissions.

In the second, research published in American Health & Drug Benefits journal and supported by Abbott found that when Advocate Health Care implemented a nutrition care program at four of its Chicago area hospitals, it showed more than $4.8 million in cost savings due to shorter hospital stays and lower readmission rates.

The Benefits Data Trust research found that participation by low-income seniors in the federal Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) cut their odds of hospital admissions by 14 percent. The food stamps also reduced the need for ER visits by 10 percent, and cut their likelihood of going into a nursing home by nearly one quarter.

Finally, SNAP participation also led to an 8 to 10 percent drop in the number of days a patient who was admitted remained in one of these facilities.

As a result, hospitals and health care systems such as Advocate Health Care are looking at the value of nutrition to improve care and help patients get back to living a healthier life.

Starting in 2014, Advocate Health Care, the largest health system in Illinois and one of the largest accountable care organizations (ACO) in the country, implemented two models of a nutrition care program for patients at risk of malnutrition. The nutrition-focused quality improvement program, which targeted malnourished hospitalized patients, consisted of screening patients with a validated screening tool at admission, rapidly administering oral nutritional supplements, and educating patients on supplement adherence.

The leader in population health found that by doing so, it reduced 30-day readmission rates by 27 percent and the average hospital stay by nearly two days.

More recently, to evaluate the cost-savings of the Advocate approach, researchers used a novel, web-based budget impact model to assess the potential cost savings from the avoided readmissions and reduced time in hospital. Compared to the hospitals’ previous readmission rates and patients’ average length of stay, researchers found that optimizing nutrition care in the four hospitals resulted in roughly $3,800 cost savings per patient treated for malnutrition.

Given the healthcare industry’s appetite for value- and quality-based programs, SDOH screenings and the fortification of nutrition programs in both community and inpatient settings appear to be just what the doctor ordered. However, while a 2017 study on Social Determinants of Health identified widespread adoption of SDOH screenings by providers, it also documented a scarcity of supportive community services for SDOH-positive individuals.

Infographic: What Benefits Do Patient Portals Offer Hospitals and Health Systems?

July 28th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

As the use of electronic health records (EHRs) has increased, so has the functionality of patient portals that are often integrated with EHRs, according to a new infographic by UbiCare.

The infographic examines patient portal usage trends.

Understanding the factors that cause patient disengagement is a crucial first step in improving engagement rates, critical in today’s accountable healthcare systems.

Drilling into the customer comments from its Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (CAHPS®) survey helped PinnacleHealth System frame the components of its patient engagement strategy…targeting patients with gaps in care and providing information and education to clinicians throughout the system on their role in increasing engagement rates.

During A Two-Pronged Patient Engagement Strategy: Closing Gaps in Care and Coaching Clinicians, a 45-minute webinar on August 17th at 1:30 p.m. Eastern, Kathryn Shradley, director of population health, PinnacleHealth System, will share her organization’s patient engagement framework, including its two-pronged approach to increase engagement rates across the health system.

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“My Pleasure” or “No Problem”: Which Response Would Healthcare Consumers Prefer to Hear?

July 19th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Healthcare Scripting

How effective is scripting in the healthcare setting?

Years ago an article I read in a business magazine suggested replacing the phrase “No problem” with “My pleasure” when responding to a customer request. Attune to this language nuance, it began to irk me when someone would say “No problem” and conversely when I respond “My pleasure” a customer interaction takes a more positive spin.

Fast forward many years, and I’ve started to hear an increasing number of healthcare organizations using scripting in a variety of ways…to improve the patient experience, increase patient engagement, protect patient privacy and in a host of other circumstances.

How effective are these scripts? Can they help increase patient satisfaction and engagement? Will they have an impact on HCAHPS and HEDIS scores? What’s your experience with scripting in patient and member interactions?

In Montefiore Social Determinants of Health Screening, Patients’ Needs Shape SDOH Workflow

July 11th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan
 Clinical factors drive 15 percent of a patient's well-being; social determinants of health like finances drive the rest.


Clinical factors drive 15 percent of a patient’s well-being; social determinants of health like finances drive the rest.

In Dr. Amanda Parsons’ twenty-something years in healthcare, she has never implemented a program as widely embraced as Montefiore Health System’s Social Determinants of Health (SDOH) screening.

“It was one of the few times in my career that I didn’t encounter physician resistance,” said Dr. Parsons, Montefiore’s vice president of community and population health. The health system’s screening assesses patients for a host of SDOH factors that drive 85 percent of their well-being, including housing, food security, access to care or medications, finances, transportation and violence.

Following assessment, the goal is to connect individuals who screen positively for SDOHs with assistance from the area’s robust network of community organizations.

Dr. Parsons outlined her organization’s SDOH screening process, findings, challenges, and future plans during Assessing Social Determinants of Health: Collecting and Responding to Data in the Primary Care Setting, a June 2017 webcast by the Healthcare Intelligence Network now available for rebroadcast.

To get started, Montefiore piggybacked on the efforts of a few provider sites already screening for SDOHs. It then offered providers a choice of two validated screening tools, the first developed at a fifth-grade reading level, the second a more sophisticated “stressor” screen. Thirdly, it built a two-tiered triage system that leveraged social workers for individuals with very high SDOH needs, and community health workers to assist with lower-level needs.

Referrals would come from existing data banks or a host of new online referral tools, many of which Dr. Parsons mentioned during the webcast.

Interestingly, while Montefiore is fully live on an EPIC® electronic health record, SDOH screenings are currently conducted on paper, noted Dr. Parsons. This decision was one of multiple considerations in workflow creation, including respect for patient privacy.

For the time being, each Montefiore provider site selects a unique population to screen—or opts not to screen at all, if staffing is lacking. For example, one site screens all patients scheduled for annual physicals, while another screens patients recently discharged from the hospital.

In an initial readout of both screens, SDOH positivity was highest for housing and finances.

By the end of 2017, Montefiore expects to have completed more than 10,000 screenings. The health system, which serves some 700,000 patients, also plans to boost its ranks of community health workers, broadening its referral network.

Looking ahead, Montefiore will address a number of key administrative and emotional barriers. Some patient issues, like overcoming the stigma of seeing a social worker, can be minimized with a simple scripting change. Others, like alleviating an individual’s financial pain or putting a roof over a family’s head, are much more complicated.

Also needed is a process to confirm a patient has “gone that last mile” and obtained the recommended support, Dr. Parsons added.

As it expands SDOH screening, Montefiore is banking on that swell of engaged providers. As part of its mission to provide comprehensive, ‘cradle-to-grave’ care for its mostly Medicaid and otherwise government-insured population, Montefiore “intervenes even when there is no payment structure for that work,” said Dr. Parsons.

Falling into that category is SDOH screening. “Much of the Social Determinants of Health work is not very billable in the traditional paper service model, but it is incredibly important to do, regardless.”

Listen to an interview with Dr. Parsons on adapting SDOH screenings for different populations.
TW_Montefiore_SDOH_webinar0617

Infographic: Patient Engagement in the Age of Social Media

June 2nd, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Effective patient engagement has been linked with increased adherence to medical plans, reduced hospitalizations, and higher revenues, according to a new infographic by ChartLogic. One way to generate these results is by meeting patients where they spend the most time, i.e. social media.

When healthcare consumers connect with physicians or healthcare providers through one of the major social channels (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc), their first experience should be a positive one, with good information on how to get in touch. Links to helpful health apps and portals are also appreciated. Developing a social strategy should be a cornerstone of every organization’s patient engagement strategy.

The infographic examines how practices can increase patient engagement, why it’s a good thing, and potential benefits.

Patient-centric interventions like population health management, health coaching, home visits and telephonic outreach are designed to engage individuals in health self-management—contributing to healthier clinical and financial results in healthcare’s value-based reimbursement climate.

But when organizations consistently rank patient engagement as their most critical care challenge, as hundreds have in response to HIN benchmark surveys, which strategies will help to bring about the desired health behavior change in high-risk populations?

9 Protocols to Promote Patient Engagement in High-Risk, High-Cost Populations presents a collection of tactics that are successfully activating the most resistant, hard-to-engage patients and health plan members in chronic condition management. Whether an organization refers to this population segment as high-risk, high-cost, clinically complex, high-utilizer or simply top-of-the-pyramid ‘VIPs,’ the touch points and technologies in this resource will recharge their care coordination approach.

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Infographic: The Battle for Medication Adherence

May 24th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Patient adherence to a prescription regimen can reduce costs and improve the quality of life, according to a new infographic by Medical Marketing & Media.

However, healthcare providers and pharmaceutical companies struggle to find the best tools, words and technologies that will improve adherence rates among patients with chronic conditions.

The infographic examines the impact of non-adherence and how text messaging and “polypills” can impact adherence.

Leveraging Pharmacists to Reduce Cost and Improve Medication Adherence in High-Risk PopulationsWhen it comes to medication management for Medicare beneficiaries, there are more than 25 different factors that can complicate proper use of prescribed medicines—from affordability issues, even among the insured, to fear of a drug’s side effects to potential dangers from high-risk medications or health conditions.

Leveraging Pharmacists to Reduce Cost and Improve Medication Adherence in High-Risk Populations examines Novant Health’s deployment of pharmacists as part of its five-pronged strategy to deliver healthcare value through medication management services.

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Infographic: Improving Health Literacy with Data

May 10th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Individuals are not solely responsible for increasing their health literacy, healthcare organizations are accountable too, according to a new infographic by Sagitec.

The infographic examines health literacy trends, implications, possibilities and solutions.

Framework for Patient Engagement: 6 Stages to Success in a Value-Based Health SystemIntermountain Healthcare’s strategic six-point patient engagement framework not only has transformed patient care delivered by the Salt Lake City-based organization but also has fostered an attitude of shared accountability throughout the not-for-profit health system.

Framework for Patient Engagement: 6 Stages to Success in a Value-Based Health System details Intermountain’s multilayered approach and how it supports its corporate mission: Helping people live the healthiest lives possible.

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Infographic: Improve Patient Engagement To Increase Medication Adherence

March 3rd, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Chronic illnesses treated with long-term use of medications could be more successful with improved medication adherence rates, according to a new infographic by Fleming. Some 50% of patients do not take their medications as prescribed.

The infographic drills down on the factors related to non-adherence, the cost of non-adherence and the impact of technology on patient engagement.

Improve Patient Engagement To Increase Medication Adherence

Framework for Patient Engagement: 6 Stages to Success in a Value-Based Health SystemIntermountain Healthcare’s strategic six-point patient engagement framework not only has transformed patient care delivered by the Salt Lake City-based organization but also has fostered an attitude of shared accountability throughout the not-for-profit health system.

Framework for Patient Engagement: 6 Stages to Success in a Value-Based Health System details Intermountain’s multilayered approach and how it supports its corporate mission: Helping people live the healthiest lives possible.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today. Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.