Archive for the ‘Patient Engagement’ Category

Guest Post: Americans Say Healthcare Isn’t the Consumer Experience Leader It Needs to Be

March 14th, 2019 by Nate Brogan

Healthcare consumer experiences are falling short of patients’ expectations, according to a West survey. West surveyed 1,036 adults and 317 healthcare providers in the United States to learn how Americans feel their healthcare experiences stack up against other consumer experiences. The survey revealed that, although patients want healthcare experiences to outshine other consumer experiences, 72 percent of patients feel healthcare is falling behind other industries in terms of delivering exceptional experiences. The solution? Patients suggest better communication is needed for healthcare to live up to consumer experience expectations.

More than half (56 percent) of providers agree that healthcare may be trailing other industries when it comes to delivering meaningful consumer experiences, the West survey revealed. Also, around one in three Americans believe healthcare organizations are not as focused on customer experiences as grocery stores (30 percent), travel companies (30 percent) and financial services companies (29 percent).

Lagging Healthcare Experiences

Patients who feel healthcare organizations need to raise the bar when it comes to delivering customer experiences point to billing and wait times as two of the areas where improved communication could make healthcare experiences better. Around one in three patients say healthcare bills are more confusing than other bills (30 percent) and doctors run late for appointments more frequently than service providers from other industries (35 percent). Both of those, patients say, detract from the overall healthcare consumer experience.

Transforming healthcare experiences—at least in regard to billing and wait times—may be as easy as making some simple communication adjustments. It doesn’t take much in terms of time or resources to send patients a text or email that notifies them when a doctor is running behind schedule. Most healthcare organizations already use patient engagement technology that enables teams to send patients automated messages to remind them about upcoming appointments. That same technology can be used to send other types of messages to patients—like a message to clarify a bill, for example.

Here is a closer look at two communication upgrades healthcare teams can make to deliver better experiences for patients:

Actively and clearly communicate about financial responsibilities.

Most patients agree that interpreting and paying medical bills is confusing. The financial stress of having to pay medical bills can be heavy enough. But add to it the confusion of trying to determine what amount is actually owed, what is covered by insurance, what services are included in billed costs, and the process of paying medical bills can become overwhelming. A majority of healthcare providers (61 percent) admit that they believe healthcare bills are more confusing than other bills. Unfortunately, healthcare’s lack of cost transparency and complicated billing can cause patients to feel negatively about their healthcare experiences. But some of that frustration can easily be avoided.

Sending messages to communicate about costs and payments can eliminate stress caused by medical bills and improve overall healthcare experiences for patients. Healthcare teams that use patient engagement technology to send appointment reminders can adapt their messages and use their existing technology to communicate about a variety of financial topics. This might mean sending patients messages following appointments to let them know when to expect a bill, what services will be included on their bill and what payment options are available to them. It could also mean following up with a message after a bill has been sent, to explain and clarify what costs are covered by insurance. According to West’s survey findings, only 15 percent of providers routinely send these types of messages. Making this type of increased communication a standard part of the billing process allows patients to better budget for healthcare expenses, and it lessens confusion and frustration—in other words, a big patient experience improvement.

Notify patients when there are delays or changes to scheduled appointments.

Another time when patients want increased communication is when doctors are running late. More than eight in ten patients (83 percent) think healthcare organizations are more likely than other companies to run behind schedule or keep them waiting. Because patients typically don’t find out about delays until after they arrive for an appointment, this causes a lot of waiting. Many providers don’t recognize quite how much of a problem waiting is, or that delays are a major frustration for patients. Less than half of providers (42 percent) think healthcare professionals actually run late more frequently than service providers in other industries. This explains why less than half (49 percent) of healthcare providers say that their patients receive notifications (text messages, voice calls or emails) when there are delays that impact their healthcare appointments.

It is unlikely that delays could be completely eliminated or that providers could maintain an on-time schedule 100 percent of the time. However, healthcare teams can certainly reduce waiting by leveraging their appointment reminder technology to communicate with patients when there are delays. Other industries send similar messages to alert consumers of delays. For example, airlines send messages to notify fliers of delayed and cancelled flights. By doing this, it allows consumers to adjust their arrival time and it helps minimize frustration. When healthcare teams send these types of communications to patients, they can show patients their time is valued and help them feel better about their healthcare experiences.

Patients hold healthcare to high standards; they want healthcare experiences to outshine other consumer experiences. Taking advantage of opportunities to use technology-enabled communications to better communicate with patients is an effective way to deliver better patient experiences. And doing so can help healthcare become the consumer experience leader patients expect it to be.

Nate Brogan

Nate Brogan

About the Author: Nate Brogan is an advocate for utilizing technology-enabled communications to engage and activate patients beyond the clinical setting, promoting the idea that engaging with patients between healthcare appointments in meaningful ways will encourage and inspire them to follow and embrace treatment plans—and that activating these positive behaviors ultimately leads to better outcomes for both healthcare organizations and patients. Brogan currently serves as President of Notification Services at West (www.west.com), where the healthcare mission is to help organizations harness communications to expand the boundaries of where, when, and how healthcare is delivered.

Infographic: Improving Care Quality with Patient Engagement

January 21st, 2019 by Melanie Matthews

Healthcare leaders should strategically distribute work among different care team members to enrich the end-to-end care experience of patients, according to a new infographic by Innovaccer.

The infographic examines patient engagement trends and the impact of patient engagement on care quality.

9 Protocols to Promote Patient Engagement in High-Risk, High-Cost PopulationsPatient-centric interventions like population health management, health coaching, home visits and telephonic outreach are designed to engage individuals in health self-management—contributing to healthier clinical and financial results in healthcare’s value-based reimbursement climate. But when organizations consistently rank patient engagement as their most critical care challenge, as hundreds have in response to HIN benchmark surveys, which strategies will help to bring about the desired health behavior change in high-risk populations?

9 Protocols to Promote Patient Engagement in High-Risk, High-Cost Populations presents a collection of tactics that are successfully activating the most resistant, hard-to-engage patients and health plan members in chronic condition management. Whether an organization refers to this population segment as high-risk, high-cost, clinically complex, high-utilizer or simply top-of-the-pyramid ‘VIPs,’ the touch points and technologies in this resource will recharge their care coordination approach.

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Infographic: Consumer Expectations Define Today’s Patient Journey

January 16th, 2019 by Melanie Matthews

The modern patient’s healthcare journey is made up of seven distinct phases, according to a new infographic by Stericycle Communication Solutions.

The infographic dives into how to capitalize on opportunities to enhance engagement throughout each phase—and to avoid the very real risks that could damage the patient experience.

Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action PlanUnityPoint Health has moved from a siloed approach to improving the patient experience at each of its locations to a system-wide approach that encompasses a consistent, baseline experience while still allowing for each institution to address its specific needs. Armed with data from its Press Ganey and CAHPS ® Hospital Survey scores, UnityPoint’s patient experience team developed a front-line staff-driven improvement action plan.

During Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action Plan a 45-minute webinar, now available for replay, Paige Moore, director, patient experience at UnityPoint Health—Des Moines, shares how the organization switched from a top-down, leadership-driven patient experience improvement approach to one that engages front-line staff to own the process.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Using Technology To Drive Patient Engagement

November 16th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Technology is one of the best tools healthcare organizations have for engaging and empowering patients, according to a new infographic by athenahealth, Inc.

The infographic examines four ways healthcare organizations can engage patients through technology.

Patient-centric interventions like population health management, health coaching, home visits and telephonic outreach are designed to engage individuals in health self-management—contributing to healthier clinical and financial results in healthcare’s value-based reimbursement climate.

But when organizations consistently rank patient engagement as their most critical care challenge, as hundreds have in response to HIN benchmark surveys, which strategies will help to bring about the desired health behavior change in high-risk populations?

9 Protocols to Promote Patient Engagement in High-Risk, High-Cost Populations presents a collection of tactics that are successfully activating the most resistant, hard-to-engage patients and health plan members in chronic condition management. Whether an organization refers to this population segment as high-risk, high-cost, clinically complex, high-utilizer or simply top-of-the-pyramid ‘VIPs,’ the touch points and technologies in this resource will recharge their care coordination approach.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: 5 Strategies To Encourage Positive Online Physician Ratings

October 26th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Patients are starting to rely on physician reviews to help them select a physician and recent developments suggest that these reviews may one day affect physician availability in payer networks, according to a new infographic by NORCAL Group.

The infographic describes the nature of these reviews and offers strategies for encouraging positive ones to help physician practices maintain a positive online reputation.

Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action PlanUnityPoint Health has moved from a siloed approach to improving the patient experience at each of its locations to a system-wide approach that encompasses a consistent, baseline experience while still allowing for each institution to address its specific needs. Armed with data from its Press Ganey and CAHPS ® Hospital Survey scores, UnityPoint’s patient experience team developed a front-line staff-driven improvement action plan.

During Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action Plan a 45-minute webinar, now available for replay, Paige Moore, director, patient experience at UnityPoint Health—Des Moines, shares how the organization switched from a top-down, leadership-driven patient experience improvement approach to one that engages front-line staff to own the process.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Unlocking the New Patient Engagement Experience

October 12th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

The digital age is no longer about just the product—it’s equally about the customer experience, according to a new infographic by Publicis Health.

The infographic explores the shift occurring in the healthcare space to a new outcome-based economy that is powered by an increasingly digital and data-driven experience.

Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action PlanUnityPoint Health has moved from a siloed approach to improving the patient experience at each of its locations to a system-wide approach that encompasses a consistent, baseline experience while still allowing for each institution to address its specific needs. Armed with data from its Press Ganey and CAHPS ® Hospital Survey scores, UnityPoint’s patient experience team developed a front-line staff-driven improvement action plan.

During Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action Plan a 45-minute webinar, now available for replay, Paige Moore, director, patient experience at UnityPoint Health—Des Moines, shares how the organization switched from a top-down, leadership-driven patient experience improvement approach to one that engages front-line staff to own the process.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Healthcare Consumer Insight & Digital Engagement

October 1st, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Healthcare consumers are relying more on online ratings and review sites to make informed healthcare decisions, according to a new infographic by Binary Fountain, Inc.

The infographic examines consumer comfort levels with sharing healthcare experiences online, the growing dependence on online ratings and review sites and the top websites/platforms for choosing a physician.

Patient-centric interventions like population health management, health coaching, home visits and telephonic outreach are designed to engage individuals in health self-management—contributing to healthier clinical and financial results in healthcare’s value-based reimbursement climate.

But when organizations consistently rank patient engagement as their most critical care challenge, as hundreds have in response to HIN benchmark surveys, which strategies will help to bring about the desired health behavior change in high-risk populations?

9 Protocols to Promote Patient Engagement in High-Risk, High-Cost Populations presents a collection of tactics that are successfully activating the most resistant, hard-to-engage patients and health plan members in chronic condition management. Whether an organization refers to this population segment as high-risk, high-cost, clinically complex, high-utilizer or simply top-of-the-pyramid ‘VIPs,’ the touch points and technologies in this resource will recharge their care coordination approach.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

10 Critical Care Coordination Model Elements for Medicaid Managed Care Members

May 17th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

There are 10 critical elements of the care coordination model for Independent Health Care Plan (iCare) Medicaid managed care members, according to Lisa Holden, vice president of accountable care, iCare.

The first element and touchpoint for Medicaid managed care members is their care coordinator. “Every single one of our incoming SSI Medicaid members is assigned to a care coordinator,” Holden told participants in the May 2018 webinar, Medicaid Member Engagement: A Telephonic Care Coordination Relationship-Building Strategy, now available for replay. “That person is responsible for everything to do with that member’s coordination of care.”

Care coordinators are assigned to every Medicaid member and are responsible for engaging and coordinating member’s care needs.

“We want our care coordinators to make an initial phone call as early as a couple of days after the member is enrolled in our plan,” she said. “If the member is interested in having a conversation, we offer to conduct a health risk assessment. But if the timing isn’t right, then we offer to schedule another appointment. There’s no pressure except that we want them to feel engaged by us.”

Once completed, the health risk assessment forms the basis of an interdisciplinary individualized care plan created by the care coordinator with the member.

The care coordinator, who is a social worker by background, has access to a nurse, who is available for medically complex members, said Holden.

iCare also relies on health coaches. Health coaches are now teaming up with a care coordinator as much as, if not more than, the nurses are historically, Holden said.

“Our health coaches are literally assigned to work in the community to become very familiar with the resources that are available,” she added. “They are becoming steeped in the communities in which they serve. Each one is assigned to a neighborhood, and we’ve asked them, ‘Get to know the police. Get to know the fire. Get to know the food organizations and food pantries. Get to know the housing specialists in your area.'”

The health coaches also help the care coordinators locate difficult-to-contact members by being in the community as a boots on the ground force. They’re also focused on assessing and addressing social determinants of health.

“We really believe that health coaches are going to be the key to our success in this year and in years to come,” Holden explained.

In addition to the care coordinators, health coaches and nurses, the care coordination team includes two specialized positions…a trauma-informed intervention specialist and a mental health and substance abuse intervention specialist. “We brought those two specialties into this program for our Medicaid members because we know that there’s a high instance of behavioral health conditions, which usually has another diagnosis of alcohol and drug use, not always, but quite often. We wanted to have the team ready to engage the member,” said Holden.

Once the member is engaged, iCare’s care coordination team begins to identify unmet needs, she explained. “We want to know, ‘Is their life going well? Do they have appropriate medical care? Are they in a relationship with a primary care provider that they feel is co-respectful? Are they getting their answers to their questions?'”

To begin talking about medical needs, the care coordination team has to establish trust, said Holden. “We have to talk with the member in an honest way that reflects our respect for them and also engages them in order for them to tell us how they really feel.”

iCare uses the Patient Activation Measure tool to help identify where the member is in a spectrum of four different levels of activation. iCare then tailors its member engagement approach to build a trusting relationship and provide member education by recognizing where they are in their activation level.

Following up on preventive measures are key for the iCare care coordination model. Care coordinators reach out to members for care plan updates. The care plan has to be alive and very member-centric, said Holden. The health risk assessment is repeated each year and the care plan is updated based on those results.

iCare is also focusing on social determinants of health with the recognition that they impact a members’ health more than clinical care. Clinical care attributes to only about 20 percent of somebody’s health outcomes; the rest of that 80 percent is made up of by health behaviors, social and economic factors, and physical environment. “If we don’t get underneath those issues, we can ask for things to improve, but we’re going to see minimal success,” Holden added.

During the webinar, Holden also shared: how the care coordinators helps Medicaid members overcome barriers to care; seven rising risk/acuity identification tools; readmission prevention initiatives for high-risk patients; three programs aimed at reducing high emergency department utilization; and details on a Follow-to-Home program for members who are homeless. Holden also shared: details on language to use…and not to use…when engaging members; advice on the best time to connect with members by phone, such as time of day, specific days of the months; the role of the specialist interventionist compared to the care coordinator; and the background of iCare’s care coordinators and health coaches.

Click here to view the webinar today or order a DVD or CD of the conference proceedings.

Infographic: 11 Health Literacy Tips for Providers

February 9th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Health literacy—the ability to obtain, process, and understand basic health information and services to make appropriate health decisions—is essential to promote healthy people and communities. The first ever National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL) in 2003 found that only 12 percent of U.S. adults had proficient health literacy and over a third of U.S. adults—77 million people—would have difficulty with common health tasks, such as following directions on a prescription drug label or adhering to a childhood immunization schedule using a standard chart.

An infographic by Health Communications Partners provides 11 health literacy tips for providers.

With health coach support on two fronts, PinnacleHealth Systems is changing the patient engagement conversation—both among its staff of clinicians and its most disengaged patient population.

Dual Approach to Patient Engagement: Activating High Utilizers and Coaching Clinicians describes PinnacleHealth System’s two-pronged strategy for prioritizing patient engagement within its culture, and elevating key quality and clinical metrics in the process.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Population Health Tactics to Boost an ACO’s Medicare Annual Wellness Visit Rates

February 9th, 2018 by Patricia Donovan

One of the most important revenue opportunities for primary care physicians, and for population health nurses under their direct supervision, is the Medicare Annual Wellness Visit (AWV), advises Tim Gronninger, senior vice president of development and strategy, Caravan Health. The AWV offers an opportunity to check a number of Medicare quality boxes, including preventive check-ins, vaccinations and health screenings, to help make sure that a beneficiary’s medical needs are being met.

Here, Gronninger suggests ways that physician practices can improve all-important AWV rates.

Much of increasing annual wellness visit rates is about how to manage expectations of the practice and of the patient. You’ll be chasing your tail a lot if you are looking at your data and saying, “Well, these 1,000 patients haven’t had an annual wellness visit. I’m going to make a thousand phone calls, and then I’m going to make a thousand follow-up phone calls to try to schedule them all.”

It is very important for a practice to create a process where you have the time, the space and the plan, so that when a patient comes in the door for an Evaluation and Management (E&M) visit, the patient is handed off seamlessly to a nurse coordinator to complete an annual wellness visit at the same time. Obviously, different patients will require different handling. But we have found a very high acceptance rate from that approach among patients of clients that we work with.

It’s something that many patients take for granted, that their clinician knows this about them already. However, many times, the physician in practice doesn’t know whether the patient is up to date on their mammograms or other types of screenings.

Editor’s Note: Caravan Health’s ACOs saved more than $26 million in the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) and achieved higher than average quality scores and quality reporting scores in 2016.

Source: Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success

ACO population health

Profiting from Population Health Revenue in an ACO: Framework for Medicare Shared Savings and MIPS Success examines Caravan Health’s population health-focused approach for ACOs and its potential for positioning ACOs for success under MSSP and MACRA’s Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS).