Archive for the ‘Obesity’ Category

Infographic: Reducing Childhood Obesity Through Medicaid-Public Health Collaboration

January 5th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Nearly one in six children in the U.S. is obese, representing a serious public health problem. Children covered by Medicaid are particularly at risk, with this population nearly six times more likely to be treated for obesity than those who are privately insured. Partnerships between public health and Medicaid can leverage each entity’s strengths to advance interventions aimed at reducing obesity, according to a new infographic by the Center for Health Care Strategies (CHCS).

The infographic describes cross-sector interventions tested by five states participating in CHCS’ Innovations in Childhood Obesity initiative, as well as opportunities for the field.

Assessing Social Determinants of Health: Screening Tools, Triage and Workflows to Link High-Risk Patients to Community ServicesLeveraging the experience of several physician practices already screening patients for social determinants of health (SDOH), Montefiore Health System recently rolled out a two-tiered assessment program to measure SDOH positivity in its predominantly high-risk, government-insured population.

Assessing Social Determinants of Health: Screening Tools, Triage and Workflows to Link High-Risk Patients to Community Services outlines Montefiore’s approach to identifying SDOH markers such as housing, finances, healthcare access and violence that drive 85 percent of patients” well-being, and then connecting high-need individuals to community-based services. Click here for more information.

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From Last Place, Bronx Communities Now Prize Culture of Health

December 7th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

Barely eight years ago, the Bronx landed at the very bottom of the first county health rankings issued by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) —the least healthy of 62 New York counties, to be exact.

It didn’t help that as a borough, the Bronx topped a few other lists compiled by New York officials, including the highest prevalence of obesity and diabetes and the top consumers of sugary drinks.

Rather than discourage this diverse borough, however, these rankings galvanized residents and a number of Bronx organizations, including the Bronx Institute of Health, to partner and examine facets of community life to see where health might be improved. Under the hash tag and rallying cry of #Not62, the coalition’s reach has extended into Bronx schools, housing and even local food stores known as bodegas as it attempts to reimagine and enhance community health.

During Innovative Community-Clinical Partnerships: Reducing Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities through Community Transformation, a November 2017 webcast now available for rebroadcast, Charmaine Ruddock, project director, Bronx Health REACH, charted the path to some of the innovative community health partnerships forged by her organization.

Formed in 1999 with a grant from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Bronx Health REACH (shorthand for “racial and ethnic approaches to community health”) is charged with eliminating racial and ethnic disparities in health outcomes, particularly those related to diabetes and heart disease, in Bronx populations. Since its inception, Bronx Health REACH has grown from five to more than 70 community-based organizations, schools, healthcare providers, faith-based institutions, housing, social service agencies and others.

“Those founding partners were particularly concerned that Bronx Health REACH not be seen as a program per se, but as a catalyst for creating a movement around health and well-being in the community,” explained Ms. Ruddock.

From early focus groups, Bronx Health REACH determined that community members not only felt disrespected by the healthcare system, but also powerless to advocate on their own behalf for better services. Those findings helped to shape the Bronx Health REACH mission and subsequent efforts.

Outreach began at the organizational level, such as examining the way a local church provided meals at church events. The coalition brainstormed ways to prepare those meals in a healthier manner, supplementing the church’s work with nutrition training that quickly spread throughout the faith community. From there, the program applied that approach to the food offered during school meals and via vending machines, and eventually within the local food retail environment, which consists principally of bodegas.

Today, the scope of Bronx Health REACH is broad, encompassing street safety, physical activity and overall wellness, among other areas. Its early work with bodegas has grown from demonstrations and tastings of healthy foods to the formation of a Bronx bodega work group and a new Healthy Bodegas marketing initiative. It has engaged farmers’ markets in its objective of increasing healthier food options. To that end, healthcare providers now issue “prescriptions” for fruits and vegetables that are accompanied by ten-dollar coupons.

The transformation is visible in the community, Ms. Ruddock notes. Today, some previously padlocked playgrounds are open; murals by visiting artists that adorn the walls of local housing are left alone for all to enjoy.

However, a great deal of work remains. “We have given ourselves as a goal that by 2020, we will establish a multi-sector infrastructure working with housing groups, economic development groups, and others as the first step in addressing many of the health-related factors and issues,” explained Ms. Ruddock.

But for now, the enthusiasm and contributions of Bronx residents have not gone unrewarded. In 2015, just five years after receiving its disappointing health ranking, the Bronx was one of eight recipients of the RWJF’s Culture of Health prize. The prize is awarded to communities that work to ensure residents have the opportunity to live longer, healthier and more productive lives.

Listen to Charmaine Ruddock explain how early findings from focus groups helped to shape Bronx Health REACH initiatives.

Infographic: Weighing in on Obesity

December 12th, 2014 by Melanie Matthews

Three in five adults agree that obesity is a significant problem in the United States, according to a new infographic by TeleVox.

The infographic looks at the growing obesity rates among males in the United States and how to address obesity.

Since its passage, the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) has sent major ripples across the healthcare landscape. ACA has also underscored the value of disease management in population health as a strategy to improve health outcomes and slam the brakes on healthcare spend.

38 Disease Management Metrics: Population Health Benchmarks to Drive Accountable CareTo illustrate the contributions of disease management across the care continuum, the Healthcare Intelligence Network has compiled 38 Disease Management Metrics: Population Health Benchmarks to Drive Accountable Care. Through a series of 38 graphs and charts, this 35-page resource dives deep into several years of market research to document the role and outcomes of disease management in 11 key areas, as well as the high-focus diseases and health conditions.

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Infographic: New Mobile Health Technology in 2024

February 28th, 2014 by Jackie Lyons

Technology is evolving at a fast pace, and healthcare is evolving with it. In 2024, mobile health (mHealth) technology will include contact lenses that monitor symptoms of diabetes, socks that track movement and monitor weight, and much more, according to a new infographic from BUPA.

This infographic looks at nine mHealth technologies that will monitor patients and aid in health management by 2024.

You may also be interested in this related resource: Integrating Mobile Health Remote Patient Monitoring with Telephonic Care Management for Improved Care Coordination Results. Want to know more about mHealth? During a March 19th webinar at 1:30 p.m. Eastern, Gail Miller, vice president of telephonic clinical operations in Humana’s care management organization, Humana Cares/SeniorBridge, will share details of Humana’s telephonic care management program and how these remote monitoring pilots will enhance their care coordination efforts.


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Infographic: Top Public Health Risks

December 11th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

Obesity and smoking are among the top public health risks, according to an infographic from MPHOnline.org. In fact, the infographic shows that obese adults cost $1,429 more per year in medical costs than healthy weight adults. In addition, smoking causes serious illness in approximately 8.6 million people.

This infographic also identifies other public health risks, accompanied by statistics and information regarding causes and at-risk populations.

Top Public Health Risks

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You may also be interested in this related resource: 2013 Healthcare Benchmarks: Health Coaching.

Healthcare Business Week in Review: Childhood Obesity, Dual Eligibles, ACOs, Patient Activation Measures

November 1st, 2013 by Cheryl Miller

Last year at this time we watched with disbelief as Hurricane Sandy pummeled our East coastline. Schools closed, power shut down, and Halloween was officially postponed until early November when it was considered safe for children to trick or treat.

Our own town is still recovering from the storm; scarred, vacant houses share the same block as rehabbed homes on stilt-like platforms; trailers double for once elegant restaurants and broken docks and abandoned boats patiently ride the crests of ocean waves.

It was a rocky year for healthcare as well, from an early surge in Medicare ACOs, to the embattled introduction of ACA-mandated health insurance exchanges during a government shutdown.

But many things remained the same; childhood obesity rates continued to climb , as did public health efforts to control it, including counseling and nutritional guidance, according to a new trends report from NCQA. Poverty continued to plague many Americans, particularly dual eligibles, but companies like Wellcare did their best to help them by closing social gaps with health-oriented community connections looking to “give back,” as its vice president of advocacy and community-based programs executive director Pamme Taylor demonstrates in this week’s featured book excerpt.

Organizations like HealthEast and Mercy utilized clinical analytics technologies from Optum to better understand and manage treatment for patients with chronic conditions, and advance performance for its newly formed accountable care organization (ACO).

And doctors’ policies toward accepting new Medicaid patients in the wake of expanded coverage will most likely stay the same, according to a study from Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond. The decade-plus study found that physicians might be more likely to stop accepting those patients who remain uninsured, however, as our story details.

And lastly, self-management continues to result in better patient outcomes, according to researchers from the Boston Medical Center. Patient activation, or having the knowledge, skills, and confidence needed to manage one’s health, leads to better health following hospital discharge, and lower readmission rates. Screening for patient activation could not only help hospitals identify patients at risk for readmission, but also inform the development of tailored, cost-effective intervention plans.

How did your healthcare organization fare in 2013? And what plans do you have the future? Tell us by completing our ninth annual survey on Healthcare Trends for 2014 and you’ll receive a free executive summary of the results. One respondent will win a training DVD of the “2014 Healthcare Trends and Forecasts” webinar recorded on October 30, 2013.

Infographic: Obesity in America and Beyond

September 26th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

More than one billion people worldwide are overweight and 500 million are obese, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN.

The United States currently spends $147 billion annually on medical costs related to obesity, according to a new infographic from HealthcareColleges. This infographic explains the extent of global obesity, projects future obesity statistics, and identifies what might be done to improve the current state of affairs.

Obesity in America and Beyond

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You may also be interested in this related resource: Obesity – Behavioral, Medical & Surgical Management, 3rd Edition.

Infographic: America, Land of the Obese

September 3rd, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

Obesity is officially an epidemic, and it costs the healthcare system approximately $90 billion per year, according to the surgeon general.

In the United States, one in three adults and one in six children are considered obese, according to a new infographic presented by PhentermineWars.com. This infographic also identifies factors and risks, health concerns and deaths associated with obesity, current obesity rates, the top 10 obese states and more.

America the Obese

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You may also be interested in this related resource: 2013 Healthcare Benchmarks: Health Coaching.

Infographic: Sick! Epidemic of Chronic Diseases

August 29th, 2013 by Jackie Lyons

Chronic diseases account for 70 percent of deaths every year, which translates to higher healthcare costs and utilization rates.

Heart disease has been the leading cause of mortality for Americans every year since 1920, costing an annual $108.9 billion in healthcare and lost productivity, according to a new infographic from Best Master of Science in Nursing Degrees. This infographic identifies the top chronic illnesses, their costs and possible preventative measures.

Sick! Epidemic of Chronic Diseases

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You may also be interested in this related resource: Chronic Care Professional Manual 5.0 .

Healthcare Business Week in Review: High Cost of Smoking; 4 Healthy Habits; Expanding Medicaid

June 13th, 2013 by Cheryl Miller

The High Cost of Smoking: Smokers cost more. That’s the bottom line from a new report from Ohio State University, the first study to take a comprehensive look at the financial burden for companies that employ smokers.

According to the study, U.S. businesses pay almost $6,000 per year extra for each employee who smokes, compared to the costs for employing workers who never smoked. Broken down, researchers estimated the following:

  • Lost productivity from smoke breaks cost employers more than $3,000 a year, by far, the largest drain on resources;
  • Extra healthcare costs for self-insured smokers came to $2,056;
  • Absenteeism from smoking cost $517 a year; and
  • Presenteeism, or reduced productivity related to the effects of nicotine addition, cost $462 annually.

The study focuses solely on economics and does not address ethical and privacy issues related to the adoption of workplace policies covering employee smoking. Increasingly, businesses have adopted tobacco-related policies that include requiring smokers to pay premium surcharges for their healthcare benefits or simply refusing to hire people who identify themselves as smokers. And while researchers acknowledge that providing smoking-cessation programs is an added cost for employers, they stress that employers recognize how difficult it is to quit smoking.

4 Healthy Habits to Reduce Heart Risk, Death: More bad news for smokers: those who otherwise maintain a healthy lifestyle will die sooner than those who do not.

According to a new study from Johns Hopkins University, exercising regularly, eating a healthy Mediterranean-style diet, maintaining a normal weight and, most importantly, not smoking can help improve heart health and reduce the risk of death.

Researchers found that adopting those four lifestyle behaviors protected against coronary heart disease as well as the early buildup of calcium deposits in heart arteries, and reduced the chance of death from all causes by 80 percent over an eight-year period.

Of all the lifestyle factors, researchers found that smoking avoidance played the largest role in reducing the risk of coronary heart disease and mortality. Smokers who adopted two or more of the healthy behaviors still had lower survival rates after 7.6 years than did nonsmokers who were sedentary and obese.

The findings corroborate recent recommendations by the American Heart Association, which call for maintaining a diet rich in vegetables, fruits, nuts, whole grains and fish, keeping a Body Mass Index (BMI) of less than 25, being physically active and not smoking, researchers note.

Expanding Medicaid Best Option for States: Some bad news, or food for thought, for those policymakers not planning on expanding Medicaid in their states: they will leave millions of their residents without health insurance and increase spending, at least in the short term, on the cost of treating uninsured residents, according to a new RAND Corporation study.

If 14 states decide not to expand Medicaid under the ACA as intended by their governors, those state governments collectively will spend $1 billion more on uncompensated care in 2016 than they would if Medicaid is expanded, researchers say. In addition, those 14 state governments would forgo $8.4 billion annually in federal payments and an additional 3.6 million people will be left uninsured.

States that do not expand Medicaid will not receive the full benefit of the savings that will result from providing less uncompensated care, researchers note. But they will be subject to taxes, fees and other revenue provisions of the ACA.

Commercial Payors Lag Behind Medicare in Offering ACOs: And lastly, commercial payors aren’t offering as many upside-only payment structures that are most popular among early accountable care organizations (ACOs), according to an analysis by the Premier Healthcare Alliance.

The study of 85 payor arrangements found that more than one-third were for upside-only shared savings, most of which fall within the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) or Medicare Advantage (57 percent).

Other upside-only options were reported with Medicaid (7 percent), provider-owned plans (7 percent) and self-insured employers (7 percent).

However, upside arrangements are lacking in commercial markets. Among the ACOs analyzed, only 21 percent of commercial arrangements offer upside shared savings, and these were clustered in just four markets. In addition, agreements tended to be smaller in scope, usually for 5,000 covered lives or less.