Archive for the ‘Healthcare Quality Reporting’ Category

2016 ACO Results: Majority of Next Generation and Pioneer ACOs Earn Shared Savings

October 20th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

Six of eight Pioneer ACOs and eleven of eighteen Next Generation ACOs earned shared savings in separate initiatives in 2016, according to newly released quality and financial data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

In 2016 Performance Year Five of the Pioneer ACO program, one of several new accountable care organization (ACO) payment and service delivery models introduced by CMS to serve a range of provider organizations, only Monarch HealthCare and Partners HealthCare were not among shared savings earners.

Banner Health Network emerged as the top 2016 Pioneer ACO performer, earning nearly $11 million in shared savings based on care provided to its more than 42,000 beneficiaries.

In order to receive savings or owe losses in a given year, Pioneer ACO expenditures must be outside a minimum corridor set by the ACO’s minimum savings rate (MSR) and minimum loss rate (MLR).

The Pioneer ACO model is designed for healthcare organizations and providers already experienced in coordinating care for patients across care settings. It allowed these provider groups to move more rapidly from a shared savings payment model to a population-based payment model on a track consistent with but separate from the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

The Pioneer ACO Model began with 32 ACOs in 2012 and concluded December 31, 2016 with eight ACOs participating.

Meanwhile, at the conclusion of 2016 Performance Year One of the Next Generation ACO model, Baroma, Triad and Iowa Health topped the list of ACO earners in this program, with each organization accumulating more than $10 million shared savings.

Building upon experience from the Pioneer ACO Model and the Medicare Shared Savings Program, CMS’s Next Generation ACO Model sets predictable financial targets, enables providers and beneficiaries greater opportunities to coordinate care, and aims to attain the highest quality standards of care.

According to a CMS fact sheet, 18 ACOs participated in the Next Generation ACO Model for the 2016 performance year, and 28 ACOs are joining the Model for 2017, bringing the total number of Next Generation ACOs to 45. The Next Generation ACO Model will consist of three initial performance years and two optional one-year extensions.

CMS’s ACO models are one of seven Innovation categories designed to incentivize healthcare providers to become accountable for a patient population and to invest in infrastructure and redesigned care processes that provide for coordinated care, high quality and efficient service delivery.

Infographic: Are Specialty Practices Prepared for MACRA?

September 18th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

A growing number of specialty physicians, comprised mainly of oncologists and urologists, recognize that clinical, financial and operational changes are needed to be successful under value-based healthcare reimbursement models stemming from MACRA regulations. However, the majority has not yet invested in organizational, IT, or service improvements needed to achieve them, according to a new study by Integra Connect.

A new infographic by Integra Connect highlights the survey findings, including details on the barriers to MIPS success and practices’ plans to optimize MIPS success.

Under CMS’s “Pick Your Pace” choices for Year 1 Quality Payment Program participation, physician practices may opt for the minimum activity necessary to avoid a payment penalty in 2019 by simply submitting some data in 2017.

However, instead of delaying MACRA participation to the later part of this year, physicians should prepare and better position themselves today for MIPS success by analyzing their existing CMS data on their practices’ performance and laying a path now toward performance improvement.

Physician MACRA-Readiness: Mining QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize MIPS Performance describes the wealth of data analytics available from the CMS Enterprise Portal–Quality Resource Use Reports (QRURs) and other reports providing a window into practice performance under the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). MIPS is one of two MACRA reimbursement paths and the one where most physician practices are expected to align.

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Service Action Teams Turn Front-Line Staff into Patient Experience Ambassadors

August 8th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan
Patient Experience

Increasingly, patient satisfaction scores figure into payors’ healthcare reimbursement formulas.

UnityPoint Health is so invested in the concept of patient experience that it charges each member of its organization, whether healthcare provider or not, with a set of basic behaviors designed to improve it.

These four foundational behaviors, rooted in courtesy and common sense, drive the manner in which patients, families and visitors are greeted and assisted at all times.

“We know there are dozens of initiatives and tactics that can be used to help improve patient experience,” said Paige Moore, director of patient experience at UnityPoint Health-Des Moines, “But the four we chose were driven by patient and visitor comments and feedback.”

Ms. Moore shared these behaviors, as well as an inside look at her organization’s patient experience improvement plan, during Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action Plan, a July 2017 webinar now available in on-demand and training formats.

Having established this system-wide coda for all employees, UnityPoint Health next looked at further enlisting its frontline staff in efforts to improve the patient experience. To do so, it created a set of seven service action teams, with two more in the works.

Each service action team is composed of at least 50 percent of that department’s frontline staff, rounded out by an executive sponsor and team lead.

“We want all of our team members to be actively engaged in the projects, to take responsibility for them, to be ambassadors and patient experience champions throughout the organization,” explained Ms. Moore.

Each team reviews results from HCAHPS® and Press Ganey® patient experience surveys to identify department priorities, such as nurses’ narration of care, physicians’ use of clear language, or discharge or transfer processes.

UnityPoint Health launched its first service action team in 2014 for outpatient services. “This was our largest volume for surveys and it also had some of our lowest patient experience performance. We really wanted to get in and see what could we do to make the biggest impact on the highest number of our patients.”

Once that team developed some tactics to improve patient privacy concerns, wait times and registration processes, it saw improvements in those areas.

During the program, Ms. Moore outlined priorities and shared results from each service action team.

Importantly, there are two support service action teams: a measurements team to educate employees on the relevance of patient experience scores and their role in them, and a communications team to convey information on patient experience activities throughout UnityPoint Health. The health system also recently launched an “Excellence in Patient Experience” awards program.

And rounding out the program is the placement of patient experience directors like Ms. Moore throughout the organization, each supported by a physician champion.

Physician education in patient experience is ongoing, she added, whether during rounds or mandatory one-on-one shadowing and coaching for patient experience for all new hires.

Listen to an interview with Paige Moore on UnityPointHealth’s four foundational behaviors.

CMS Quality Payment Program: Clinicians Should Expect MIPS Participation Status Letter This Month

May 4th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

change this

CMS has specified two key criteria for MIPS participation.

The Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) is reviewing claims and letting practices know which clinicians need to take part in the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), according to information on MLNConnects, the CMS Medical Learning Network.

MIPS is an important part of the new Quality Payment Program (QPP). In late April through May, clinicians will get a letter from their Medicare administrative contractor that processes Medicare Part B claims, providing the participation status of each MIPS clinician associated with their Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN).

Clinicians should participate in MIPS in the 2017 transition year if they meet the following conditions:

  • Bill more than $30,000 in Medicare Part B allowed charges a year; and
  • Provide care for more than 100 Part B-enrolled Medicare beneficiaries a year.

The QPP intends to shift reimbursement from the volume of services provided toward a payment system that rewards clinicians for their overall work in delivering the best care for patients. It replaces the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) formula and streamlines the “Legacy Programs:” Physician Quality Reporting System, the Value-based Payment Modifier, and the Medicare Electronic Health Records Incentive Program.

During this first year of the QPP program, CMS said it is committed to working with clinicians to streamline the process as much as possible. The federal payor stated that its goal is to further reduce burdensome requirements so that providers can deliver the best possible care to patients.

Infographic: Navigating the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System

February 17th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

The goal of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services’ new quality program, the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), is to streamline quality reporting to CMS and improve care, according to a new infographic by athenaInsight, Inc.

The infographic examines how MIPS will impact an average clinician this year…and in 2019 when the 2017 reporting will impact a clinician’s reimbursement rates.

Infographic: EHR + CRM = Superior Patient Engagement

Under CMS’s “Pick Your Pace” choices for Year 1 Quality Payment Program participation, physician practices may opt for the minimum activity necessary to avoid a payment penalty in 2019: simply submitting some data in 2017.

However, instead of delaying MACRA participation to the later part of this year, physicians should prepare and better position themselves today for MIPS success by analyzing their existing CMS data on their practices’ performance and laying a path toward performance improvement.

Physician MACRA-Readiness: Mining QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize MIPS Performance describes the wealth of data analytics available from the CMS Enterprise Portal–Quality Resource Use Reports (QRURs) and other reports providing a window into practice performance under the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). MIPS is one of two MACRA reimbursement paths and the one where most physician practices are expected to align.

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Physician Supplemental QRUR: Episode-Specific Patient-Level Data Tells Story of High Utilizers

February 7th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

QRUR reports provide a mirror into physicians’ cost and quality performance under MACRA.

As year one of MACRA unfolds, healthcare providers deterred by security hurdles associated with CMS Enterprise Portal access may want to reconsider. The wealth of aggregate quality and cost performance data available through the portal is well worth the trouble of accessing it, advises William Holding, consultant with PDA, Inc.

Specifically, Quality Resource and Utilization Reports (QRURs) downloadable from the portal are essential tools for physician practices that hope to succeed on MACRA-defined reimbursement paths, Holding said—even practices equipped with robust internal reporting systems.

“This is the same system that accountable care organizations (ACOs) use, and that CMS uses for many other things, so it’s a good idea to get past those barriers,” he explained during Physician MACRA Preparation: Using QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize Your Performance, a February 2017 webinar now available for replay.

Originally designed for CMS’s value-based modifier, QRURs are good indicators of future cost performance under MACRA, via either Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), where most physician practices are expected to fall initially, or Alternate Payment Models (APMs), he said.

After providing an overview of MIPS and APMs, including five essential prerequisites to MACRA preparation, Holding delved into the quality and cost metrics contained in QRURs, from aggregate data in the main report to detailed tables rich with patient-specific information.

The main QRUR report illustrates where a physician practice falls in relation to other practices on the overall composite for cost and quality. The QRUR’s Quality portion shows scores for a series of domains, including effective clinical care and patient experience, which offer a great window into how a practice might perform with different selected measures in MIPS.

Next, QRUR cost performance indicates per capita costs for attributed beneficiaries, which will remain a cost measure in MIPS.

Drilling down, Holding characterized seven associated QRUR downloads—including one table on individual eligible professional performance on the 2015 PQRS Measures—as even more useful than the QRURs themselves.

And finally, he termed the downloadable supplemental QRUR “a very powerful tool” that drills down to the beneficiary level, providing a snapshot of some of the highest cost events occurring among a practice’s patients.

“For high utilizers, for specific episodes, you can drill right down to the patient to try and understand the story. What’s happening to your patient when they’re not in your practice, and what can you do about it?” said Holding.

Having presented the available reports, Holding described four key benefits of using QRUR downloads, including as a priority setting tool, and then detailed the myriad of ways QRURs can be analyzed to improve MIPS performance.

However, Holding stressed, even physician practices with the most sophisticated reporting structures will not thrive under MACRA without the right team or culture of provider support in place. He closed his presentation with a formula for determining investment in performance improvement activities and a five-step plan for MACRA preparation.

Listen to an interview with William Holding on the use of QRURs to determine a physician practice’s highest value referral pathways.

Infographic: How Ready Are Hospitals for eCQM Submission?

September 12th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Over 86 percent of hospitals plan on submitting electronic Clinical Quality Measures (eCQMs) to CMS’ Inpatient Quality Reporting (IQR) program in 2016, according to a new infographic by medisolv.

However, only 2 percent of healthcare organizations are ready to successfully submit eCQM data tomorrow. The infographic drills down on hospital readiness levels of eCQM implementation and submission.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2016: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare IndustryFrom cost pressures, consumerism and consolidation to a proliferation of patient-centered, value-based delivery and payment models, the state of healthcare continues to challenge organizations in the industry.

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2016: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN’s 12th annual business forecast, pins down the trends destined to impact the industry in the year to come and proposes tactics C-suite executives can employ to distinguish their operations in a dynamic marketplace. Click here for more information.

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