Archive for the ‘Embedded Case Management’ Category

Breaking Down UTSACN Advanced Care Coordination: “Data Analyst Is Your Best Friend”

October 6th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

advanced care coordination

Data is useless unless transformed into actionable information, notes Cathy Bryan, UTSACN director of care coordination.

Although the care coordination director for UT Southwestern’s Accountable Care Network (UTSACN) insists there’s no secret sauce that ensures ACO success, Cathy O’Brien readily proposes eight ingredients to season care management initiatives.

It’s a recipe heavy on data analytics, and one destined to fail unless extracted data is transformed into actionable information, emphasized Ms. Bryan during Advanced Care Coordination: Bridging the Gap Between Appropriate Levels of Care and Care Plan Adherence for ACO Attributed Lives, a September 2016 webinar now available for replay.

For that transformation, the Year Three Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) ACO relies heavily on its data analyst. “Your analyst is your best friend. You need someone who is skilled and knows how to analyze large, complex data sources like you get with ACO claims data and other sources,” Ms. Bryan said.

To better manage its nearly 250,000 ACO-attributed lives (up from 19,000 in 2014), UTSACN leverages data from a number of sources, including paid claims data from CMS and commercial payors; more than 100 disparate electronic medical record (EMR) systems; and ADT feeds. This data mining has helped UTSACN to identify and bridge care and quality gaps, manage transitions in care, and risk-stratify its population for care management, including ‘risking risk’ patients exhibiting signs of struggle with adherence to care plans.

It’s also provided a starker picture of utilization, especially on the home health front. When data indicated UTSACN home health use had risen to levels more than twice the national average, UTSACN’s analyst created an internal efficiency index to categorize the more than 1,200 home health agencies in use. The use of this claims-based, risk-adjusted score ultimately pared the home health network to a manageable twenty agencies and saved approximately $6 million in home health utilization costs in the first quarter of 2016 alone.

To engage physicians, UTSACN supported the rollout of this narrow network with a large-scale reeducation effort. Presented with the rationale for this change, providers now better understand Medicare’s home health utilization rules and their accountability to the ACO for their share of costs, utilization and outcomes, notes Bryan.

“You’ve got to create buy-in. You don’t just take providers a list and say, here’s your problem. You’ve got to take a solution to them.”

Another solution designed to support providers is UTSACN’s primary-care-centric model, in which care coordination teams are paired geographically with eight to fifteen physician practices. Composed of embedded care coordinators (as well as field staff that do in-home work), the care coordination teams reach out to the practices’ patients on their behalf.

“We really see our team as an extension of the primary care practice, and we function as such. As we introduce ourselves to patients, we say we’re with the UT Southwestern Accountable Care Network calling on behalf of Dr. Smith, your primary care physician.”

As that extension, embedded care coordinators help physician practices to address barriers to patients’ medical plans of care, from lack of transportation to medication costs to the presence of falls risks in the home.

Click here to listen to an interview with Ms. Bryan.

6 Population Health Strategies to Set Stage for Physician Reimbursement

May 12th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

Robert Fortini, PNP

A team-based, top-of-license approach is key to population health success, says Robert Fortini, PNP, Bon Secours Medical Group chief clinical officer.

In the last six years, Bon Secours Medical Group (BSMG) has deployed a half-dozen population health strategies as groundwork for its Next Generation Healthcare offering. Here, Robert Fortini, PNP, BSMG chief clinical officer, identifies the tactics his organization leverages to effect health behavior change.

The specific population health strategies Bon Secours has deployed over the last six years start with the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) concept. I’m an avid believer in the concept of a team of professionals working together, along with that ‘top of license’ aspect, where it’s not just the sole domain of the independent ‘cowboy’ physician taking care of the patients. It’s pharmacists, nurses, social workers, and registered dietitians. It’s the entire team, with everyone having a vested responsibility for practicing to the top of his or her license.

Next, access is huge. It is ridiculous to think we can manage chronic disease in four 15-minute visits a year scheduled between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday, while closing at lunchtime. It’s absolutely ludicrous. We are blowing that up by opening weekends and evenings and using technology to expand access, which is critical to affecting that behavioral change.

Third, know your population. Identifying effectively those who are most at risk with advanced analytics to make your efforts more efficient is very important.

Next is managed care contracting—aggressively coming to the table with our payors to help guide the conversations and craft the contracts and benefit designs that are attainable and achievable. That has been a new experience for Bon Secours in the last five years in particular. We have a CMS-based Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) Accountable Care Organization (ACO) covering about 30,000 attributed lives. We also have a number of commercial ACO-type contractual relationships with our commercial payors.

Fifth on the list: aggressive growth for palliative and hospice. We have invested very significantly in management of advanced illness that occurs at the end of life. The Medicare numbers around that are staggering: 40 percent of Medicare spend occurs in the last two years of life, and the pain, suffering, and emotional angst that occurs for patients and their families is incredible. Investing in the resources necessary to manage that effectively has been our strategic initiative at Bon Secours. We have a very large, well-versed palliative program that provides inpatient, outpatient and even home-based palliative services. And our hospice agency, which I am responsible for in addition to our medical group, has quadrupled in size in the last two years alone.

Then, finally, we manage the white space with powered care coordination, which includes health promotion, chronic disease management, care transition management, and more.

Source: Physician Reimbursement in 2016: 4 Billable Medicare Events to Maximize Care Management Revenue and Results

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Physician-Reimbursement-in-2016-4-Billable-Medicare-Events-to-Maximize-Care-Management-Revenue-and-Results_p_5143.html

Physician Reimbursement in 2016: 4 Billable Medicare Events to Maximize Care Management Revenue and Results details the ways in which Bon Secours Medical Group (BSMG) leverages a team-based care approach, expanded care access and technology to capitalize on four Medicare billing events: transitional care management, chronic care management, Medicare annual wellness visits and advance care planning.

Bon Secours Next Generation Healthcare: Smart Tools Tell Care Transitions, Chronic Care Management Stories

February 4th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

Next Generation Healthcare smart tools facilitate Bon Secours care plans for care transitions, chronic care management and Medicare wellness visits.


A key component of chronic care management is a comprehensive plan of care—the “refrigerator copy” patients can refer to, explains Robert Fortini, PNP, chief clinical officer for Bon Secours medical Group (BSMG).

Today, using smart tools built into its electronic medical record, Bon Secours nurse navigators document twelve-point care plans for the 50 patients they have enrolled via Medicare’s year-old Chronic Care Management (CCM) codes—a number Fortini expects will double this month.

The CCM assessment tool also captures frequently forgotten issues such as depression, pain and sleep problems that can derail care, Fortini said in a recent webinar on Physician Reimbursement in 2016: Workflow Optimization for Chronic Care Management and Advance Care Planning.

Bon Secours’ seventy nurse navigators, embedded in physician practices, also tap these point-and-click smart tools to document transitions of care for patients recently discharged from the hospital. This Transition of Care smart note tracks 17 different aspects of patient care, including risk of readmission and medication reconciliation, and includes a placeholder for an advance medical directive.

Similar tools are in use for Medicare’s three types of wellness visits, he added.

“I have been in this business a long time, and the documentation that navigators produce using these workflows is extraordinary,” Fortini noted. “This is purposeful design. It tells a story and you have something actionable at the conclusion of reading it.”

The smart tools are but one aspect of Bon Secours’ Next Generation Healthcare initiative, which Fortini defined as “population health meets total access.” Next Generation Healthcare fortifies the team-based medical home foundation Bon Secours introduced six years ago with expanded care access and technology, among other components the organization leverages to improve clinical outcomes and value-based reimbursement.

In the Next Generation Healthcare model, the primary care physician is the quarterback of care, with embedded nurse navigators doing the “heavy lifting” of enrolling at-risk patients into care management, building comprehensive care plans, and scheduling Medicare beneficiaries for annual wellness visits, Fortini explained.

Additionally, Bon Secours has broadened its care access menu to include employee clinics, fast care and urgent care sites, self-scheduling, and virtual visits for primary care. The organization expects to expand virtual visits to specialist consultations and behavioral health in the near future, and also envisions virtual case management visits, allowing nurse navigators to conduct real-time medication reconciliations with at-home patients.

To round out its Next Generation Healthcare continuum, Bon Secours is training a portion of nurse navigators as facilitators in a Virginia advance care planning initiative called “Honoring Choices,” with the goal of formalizing the placement of advance directives in patients’ records.

Investing in resources necessary to manage end-of-life effectively is a critical aspect of Bon Secours’ strategic initiative, Fortini concluded. “Forty percent of Medicare spend occurs in the last two years of life, and the pain, suffering, and emotional angst that occurs for patients and their families is incredible.”

Listen to an interview with Robert Fortini in which he describes how Bon Secours nurse navigators have won over solo practitioners.

4 Patient Engagement Strategies from a Top-Performing Medicare ACO

November 17th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

The Memorial Hermann accountable care organization, a top Medicare Shared Savings Programs (MSSP) in terms of quality metrics and cost savings, is proud of the 74 percent patient engagement rate associated with its Complex Care program for individuals with complex health conditions. Here, Mary Folladori, RN, MSN, FACM, CMAC, system director of care management at the Memorial Hermann Physician Network and ACO, outlines four tactics that help to engage high-risk patients in self-management.

First, when we outreach to members during our telephone calls, we identify our team member as calling from Memorial Hermann. We have designed scripts; our team members introduce themselves as members of that particular person’s physician office. We have access to the physician clinic’s electronic medical record (EMR) as well as to the hospital EMR if that member has been hospitalized, so we’re able to represent and present knowledge of that member as part of that physician’s team. All of those combined elements help to build trust and to enhance those engagement rates.

Second, we also have learned over time that we need to offer multiple ways to work with members. Depending on the individual member and family situation, and depending on the risk and complexity of the member, we may have a team member go into one of our facilities to introduce themselves and set up a time for that initial outreach when a transition is being planned. We may meet members in their physician clinics if we have had difficulty outreaching to them. This allows us again to build that trust and rapport with a member, or build a face-to-face relationship base with the family. That has led to that higher telephonic outreach engagement rate of 74 percent.

Third, we also have been able to enhance our engagement rates because we have built very close relationships with care managers on the payor side in the past. Sometimes there might be a different type of relationship between the care or case managers on the insurance side, but in the world of our ACO, we have specifically and deliberately built very close relationships where we have worked out workflows. We get concurrent data reports for most payors so that we’re able to reach out to members in real time—within 24 hours after a discharge, for example. We also get real-time reports on gaps in care, and on frequent or high-cost utilizers.

In the past, we started out using claims that we received. That presented a challenge, because there still is a claims lag in the world we all work within. Now for the most part, we get information directly from our payor partners, which has enabled us to outreach and engage members in a real-time manner rather than three or six months after an acute episode has ended.

And finally, because we are embedded within our physician practices and so much a part of their culture, our physicians talk to their members at that point of care and let them know that a care manager by this name will reach out to them. They explain the reason for the program and encourage that member or family to participate.

Source: Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-Life

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Care-Coordination-in-an-ACO-Population-Health-Management-from-Wellness-to-End-of-Life_p_5092.html

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-Life details Memorial Hermann’s carefully executed journey to quality and the culmination of the ACO’s community-based care management program.

Longitudinal Care Plans, Risk Scores Raise Patient Engagement for MSSP ACO’s Complex Population

October 6th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

A top-performing MSSP in 2014, the Memorial Hermann ACO has successfully engaged its Complex Care population via a collaborative care coordination approach.

The Memorial Hermann ACO may have been one of 2014’s top-performing Medicare Shared Savings Programs (MSSPs), but the health system’s commitment to achieving quality outcomes was solidified more than eight years ago, when its own physicians asked for a clinically integrated physician network.

Memorial Hermann complied, developing a set of tools, training and care models to not only support the physicians but also reflect payors’ needs: chief among them, initiatives that could boost patient engagement.

Today, the Memorial Hermann ACO has a patient-centered care delivery strategy built on teamwork and collaboration. The Texas ACO is proud to point to a patient engagement rate of 74 percent for individuals enrolled in Complex Care, an initiative for individuals with long-term, multiple chronic conditions that has significantly reduced cost and hospital lengths of stay for participants.

This patient engagement measure represents members who consent to participate in the program and remain engaged for 30 days, explained Mary Folladori, RN, MSN, FACM, CMAC, system director of care management at Memorial Hermann Physician Network and ACO, during Care Coordination in an ACO: Managing the Population Health Continuum from Wellness to End-of-Life, a September 2015 webinar from the Healthcare Intelligence Network now available for replay.

Ms. Folladori provided an overview of the ACO’s care coordination strategy that in 2014 generated savings of nearly $53 million in the MSSP program, resulting in a health system payout of almost $23 million. The ACO’s performance earned Memorial Hermann a MSSP quality score of 88 percent.

Some high points from Memorial Hermann’s ACO strategy include the following:

  • Embedding of care coordinators into the ‘micro culture’ of a physician practice, its community and the members served by the practice;
  • Strategic use of a data warehouse to identify vulnerable members early and link them with needed health services;
  • Development of comprehensive risk scores derived from multiple sources for Complex Care patients; and
  • Creation of longitudinal care plans that follow Complex Care patients for up to 18 months and help to transition them back to a baseline level of functioning.

In wrapping up observations on Memorial Hermann’s quality-driven approach, Ms. Folladori quoted its CEO, Chris Lloyd: “The success that has been found within our ACO is deeply based on a collaborative approach to care. It has been cultivated over eight years with our commitment to clinical integration. We all strongly believe that without that strong clinically integrated physician network, without our physicians driving those quality outcomes, we would not have been as successful as we have.”

With so much emphasis on quality and outcomes, it’s no wonder participation today in the Memorial Hermann ACO is by invitation only—and only after a practice has passed an assessment.

3 Embedded Care Coordination Models Manage Diverse High-Risk, High-Cost Populations

June 30th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

YNHHS embedded care coordination

YNHHS uses an embedded care coordination approach to manage its high-risk, high-cost medical home patients, geriatric homebound and health system employees.

When it comes to coordinating care for its highest-risk, highest-cost individuals—whether patients in a medical home, the geriatric homebound or its own employees—Yale New Haven Health System (YNHHS) believes an onsite, embedded face-to-face approach will best position it for success in a value-based healthcare industry.

The Connecticut-based health system shared its vision for managing patients across its continuum via three embedded care coordination models during a June 2015 webinar, Embedded Care Coordination for At-Risk Populations: A Case Study from Yale New Haven Health System, now available for replay.

In the first model, livingwellCARES, RN care coordinators at YNHHS’s four health system campuses work with its high-risk, high-cost health system employees and their adult dependents with chronic disease.

“We help these employees access the care they need and identify their goals of care. We get under the surface a little bit to determine barriers to their being as healthy as they can be and manage them over time,” explained Amanda Skinner, executive director, clinical integration and population health, adding that YNHHS offers employees incentives such as waived insurance co-pays for participation.

Launched three years ago, livingwellCARES was YNHHS’s “on-the-job training for learning to manage care across the continuum,” she continued. Starting with employees with diabetes, livingwellCARES expanded to care coordination of most chronic diseases. Having significantly impacted clinical metrics like A1Cs as well as hospital utilization and ED visits in the approximately 500 employees it manages, livingwellCARES is now transitioning to a more risk-based approach.

The second embedded care coordination model, a patient-centered medical home (PCMH), also launched three years ago. Focused on complex care management, the PCMH is heavily driven by data derived from its electronic health records and patient registries, Ms. Skinner continued.

Because five of eight PCMH care coordinators are embedded and cover multiple physician practices, YNHHS is exploring the use of televisits by care coordinators to manage patients in the practices served. Also important is schooling PCMH staff in the relatively new practice of “warm handovers” during critical transitions of care.

Nine challenges of the PCMH embedded model shared by Ms. Skinner include engaging patients and obtaining reimbursement for various pay for performance programs.

In the third model, outpatient geriatric care coordination, embedded high touch care coordinators manage frail elderly deemed homebound by Medicare standards—when it’s a severe and taxing effort to leave the home—and those in assisted living facilities, explained Dr. Vivian Argento, executive director of geriatric and palliative services at Bridgeport Hospital.

“There is a challenge not just with frailty but also with access—having these patients go into the physician offices—so that the care tends to get shifted into the hospital because it’s easier for those patients to get there,” Dr. Argento explained.

Physicians and nurse practitioners provide care in the patient’s home to break that utilization cycle, while embedded care coordinators constantly collaborate with the care team to risk-stratify and prioritize patients, resolve medication concerns, make referrals, manage care transitions, triage telephone calls—all tasks required to coordinate care for what Dr. Argento termed “a very sick Medicare population in in the last two to three years of life.”

Well received by the geriatric patients, the program also has positively impacted healthcare utilization metrics: its annual hospital admission rate of 5.4-5.8 percent is significantly below Medicare’s overall 28-30 percent hospitalization rate, and the program boasts a readmissions rate of 14 percent, versus Medicare’s 20 percent national average, Dr. Argento added.

13 Metrics on Care Transition Management

May 7th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

Care transitions mandate: Sharpen communication between care sites.


Call it Care Transitions Management 2.0 — enterprising approaches that range from recording patient discharge instructions to enlisting fire departments and pharmacists to conduct home visits and reconcile medications.

To improve 30-day readmissions and avoid costly Medicare penalties, more than one-third of 116 respondents to the 2015 Care Transitions Management survey—34 percent—have designed programs in this area, drawing inspiration from the Coleman Care Transitions Program®, Project BOOST®, Project RED, Guided Care®, and other models.

Whether self-styled or off the shelf, well-managed care transitions enhance both quality of care and utilization metrics, according to this fourth annual Care Transitions survey conducted in February 2015 by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Seventy-four percent of respondents reported a drop in readmissions; 44 percent saw decreases in lengths of stay; 38 percent saw readmissions penalties drop; and 65 percent said patient compliance improved.

Following are eight more care transition management metrics derived from the survey:

  • The hospital-to-home transition is the most critical transition to manage, say 50 percent of respondents.
  • Heart failure is the top targeted health condition of care transition efforts for 81 percent of respondents.
  • A history of recent hospitalizations is the most glaring indicator of a need for care transitions management, say 81 percent of respondents.
  • Beyond the self-developed approach, the most-modeled program is CMS’ Community-Based Care Transitions Program, say 13 percent of respondents.
  • Eighty percent of respondents engage patients post-discharge via telephonic follow-up.
  • Discharge summary templates are used by 45 percent of respondents.
  • Home visits for recently discharged patients are offered by 49 percent of respondents.
  • Beyond the EHR, information about discharged or transitioning patients is most often transmitted via phone or fax, say 38 percent of respondents.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management

Care Transition Management

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Care Transitions Management HIN’s fourth annual analysis of these cross-continuum initiatives, examines programs, models, protocols and results associated with movement of patients from one care site to another, including the impact of care transitions management on quality metrics and the delivery of value-based care.

Making a Case for Embedded Case Management: 13 Factors Driving Onsite Care Coordination

April 16th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Compliance with Triple Aim goals, participation in CMS pilots to advance value-based care, formation of multidisciplinary teams and avoidance of CMS hospital readmissions penalties are among the factors driving placement of case managers at care points, according to HIN’s 2014 healthcare benchmarks survey on embedded case management.

Participation in the Medicare Physician Group Practice Demonstration, the Comprehensive Primary Care Initiative, and the Multi-Payer Advanced Primary Care Practice demonstration has prompted a number of the survey’s 125 respondents to embed case managers in primary care practices, hospital admissions and discharge departments and emergency rooms, among other sites.

To help organizations make the case for embedded case management, here are nine more program drivers, in respondents’ own words:

  • “Face-to-face contact with complex patients and their family to build trust and relationships, working directly with providers and staff.”
  • “Five to 8 percent of patients account for 40 to 60 percent of costs. It is logical. Second, ED visits and discharges represent at-risk patients where interventions can make a difference. Third, focus needs to be placed on fostering better screening results. Effort to reduce utilization.”
  • “Pursuing medical home model and team-based care, along with continuum care coordination.”
  • “Integration work between medical and behavioral healthcare.”
  • “Employer, health system, and payor collaboration to provide population health management in a medical home-like model. Also working on reducing readmissions for high-cost, high-risk conditions such as heart failure, and hospital wanted to develop an ambulatory component to reduce readmissions and improve patients’ quality of life and satisfaction.”
  • “Increased care fragmentation related to transitions in care, challenges in utilization between military and civilian network access-to-care, increased need for complex care coordination, etc.”
  • “We felt we needed to ensure the case managers were considered a part of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH) team.”
  • “Research shows [case managers] embedded at the point of care caring for the whole person in all healthcare environments produces better outcomes.”
  • “As a rural hospital, it made sense to make the best use of resources.”

Source: 2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Embedded Case Management

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/2014-Healthcare-Benchmarks-Embedded-Case-Management-_p_4985.html

2014 Healthcare Benchmarks: Embedded Case Management provides actionable data from 125 healthcare organizations leveraging embedded or co-located case management to improve healthcare quality, outcomes and spend—including those applying a hybrid embedded case management approach.

5 Trends in Chronic Care Management by Physician Practices

March 17th, 2015 by Cheryl Miller

One hundred percent of physician practices rely on face-to-face and telephonic visits to administer chronic care management (CCM) services, according to respondents to the Healthcare Intelligence Network’s 10 Questions On Chronic Care Management survey administered in January 2015.

A total of 119 healthcare organizations described tactics employed, 17 percent of which were identified as physician practices. A sampling of this sector’s results follows.

  • Less than half of physician practices (46 percent) admitted to having a chronic care management program in place. But they overwhelmingly agree (100 percent) that CMS’s CCM initiative will drive similar reimbursement initiatives by private payors.
  • This sector’s criteria for admission to existing chronic care management programs is on par with other sectors except for asthma; just 17 percent of physician practices use this as an admitting factor versus 49 percent of all respondents.
  • Not surprisingly, this sector assigns major responsibility for CCM to the primary care physician, versus 29 of all respondents. This sector also relies on healthcare case managers (40 percent versus 29 of all respondents) and advanced practice nurses (APNs) (20 percent versus 8 percent overall) to assist with CCM.
  • This sector relies most heavily on face-to-face visits for CCM services (100 percent versus 71 percent for all respondents) and telephonically (100 percent versus 87 percent of all respondents).
  • Among the biggest challenges for this sector is reimbursement (33 percent versus 20 percent overall) and documentation (17 percent versus 2 percent overall). Unlike other sectors, patient engagement is not a major challenge (17 percent versus 33 percent overall).

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Chronic Care Management

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/2015-Healthcare-Benchmarks-Chronic-Care-Management_p_5003.html

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Chronic Care Management captures tools, practices and lessons learned by the healthcare industry related to the management of chronic disease. This 40-page report, based on responses from 119 healthcare companies to HIN’s industry survey on chronic care management, assembles a wealth of metrics on eligibility requirements, reimbursement trends, promising protocols, challenges and ROI.

How Bon Secours Gets Paid for Providing Value-Based Healthcare

February 13th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

ACO

Bon Secours 'Good Health' ACO is one of the largest in CMS's Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Bon Secours Medical Group isn’t waiting for CMS to fully transition Medicare to pay-for-performance reimbursement models to get paid for providing value-based healthcare.

Instead, the 600-provider medical group has aligned itself closely with healthcare payment reform, applying a broad mix of patient-centered team-based care, technology and retooled care delivery systems to maximize quality and clinical outcomes and reduce spend associated with its managed patients.

Highlights of Bon Secours’ patient-centered approach were presented by Jennifer Seiden, administrative director, population health, and Lu Bowman, population health market program manager, during the recent webinar, Positioning for Value-Based Reimbursement: Workforce Development for Transitional Care, Chronic Care Management, now available for on-demand replay.

“The HHS’s historic announcement [of Medicare’s value-based payment timeline] was a clear signal to the industry and to the market that we better align ourselves and set ourselves up for it,” noted Ms. Seiden.

As far back as 2009, the prescient medical group had several pay-for-performance programs in place; in 2015, Bon Secours Good Health accountable care organization (ACO) is one of the largest participants in CMS’s Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

Today, most Bon Secours tactics emanate from the principles of the patient-centered medical home (PCMH), she said, with a focus on taking a population-wide view and closely managing “below-the-waterline” patients, guiding them to the most appropriate care settings and following up on them post-discharge.

The multidisciplinary care team is so essential to this patient-centered approach Bon Secours has constructed a business case to justify the team, she added, using a “Back to Basics” ROI equation developed by Robert Fortini, vice president and chief clinical officer.

Lauding Fortini’s efforts, Seiden explained the motivation behind his formula. “We had to develop a return on investment equation for the care team, because if you’re an independent practice or even if you’re employed, you’ve got to justify the expense of that additional overhead. That labor is not cheap.”

Results, revenue and key metrics like the number of post-discharge office visits and readmissions are tracked via electronic dashboards and rolled into the ROI equation.

Other strategies, including integration of behavioral health, embedding of case managers (nurse navigators) and EMTs, the use of ambulatory registries to stratify high-risk patients and a foray into retail healthcare contribute to Bon Secours’ impressive results, like a readmission rate of 2.08 percent for patients heavily monitored and managed by nurse navigators.

Ms. Bowman then described Bon Secours’ cohesive Care Management Services, which are divided into chronic care management services and complex chronic care management services. Nurse navigators are already working with Medicare’s new Chronic Care Management codes, another stepping stone in the federal payor’s volume-to-value transition.

“Nurse navigators are already providing chronic care management to patients. It was the natural next step for us to utilize these care management codes. The education for our team was focused on meeting the criteria, documentation and making sure the patient is always aware of and included in the care plan, which is so important to patient-centered care,” concluded Ms. Bowman.

Listen to comments from Jennifer Seiden.