Archive for the ‘Electronic Health Records’ Category

Infographic: Healthcare’s Blockchain Security Solution

September 26th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

As technology continues to advance, healthcare data security is becoming a great paradox where data breaches are quite commonplace. Blockchain technology is a promising solution to healthcare cybersecurity, according to a new infographic by Duquesne University.

The infographic provides an overview of blockchain basics, adoption and how it can be used in healthcare.

A New Vision for Remote Patient Monitoring: Creating Sustainable Financial, Operational and Clinical OutcomesAs healthcare moves out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into patients’ homes and their workplaces, and becomes much more proactive, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) has been expanding its remote patient monitoring program. The remote patient monitoring program at UPMC has its roots in the heart failure program but has since expanded to additional disease states across the integrated delivery system’s continuum of care.

A New Vision for Remote Patient Monitoring: Creating Sustainable Financial, Operational and Clinical Outcomes delves into the evolution of UPMC’s remote patient monitoring program from its initial focus on heart failure to how the program was scaled vertically and horizontally. Click here for more information.

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Infographic: 4 Major Healthcare Industry Digital Challenges

August 20th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Even as the Internet of Things (IoT) healthcare market is expected to grow from $41 billion in 2017 to $158 billion in 2022, the industry still faces several digital healthcare challenges, according to a new infographic by Alcatel-Lucent Enterprise.

The infographic details the four healthcare major digital challenges: IoT, mobility, digital health and security.

Real-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels.

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Infographic: Are EHRs Delivering Value-Based Care?

August 15th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

The majority of health system executives surveyed report that electronic health records (EHRs) alone are not delivering the data solutions needed to succeed with value-based care contracts, according to a new infographic by Philips Wellcentive.

The infographic examines the top-rated technology challenges EHRs lack; where executives are going for needed solutions; and how rip and replace scenarios are not being pursued.

A New Vision for Remote Patient Monitoring: Creating Sustainable Financial, Operational and Clinical OutcomesAs healthcare moves out of the brick-and-mortar traditional setting into patients’ homes and their workplaces, and becomes much more proactive, the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center (UPMC) has been expanding its remote patient monitoring program. The remote patient monitoring program at UPMC has its roots in the heart failure program but has since expanded to additional disease states across the integrated delivery system’s continuum of care.

A New Vision for Remote Patient Monitoring: Creating Sustainable Financial, Operational and Clinical Outcomes delves into the evolution of UPMC’s remote patient monitoring program from its initial focus on heart failure to how the program was scaled vertically and horizontally. Click here for more information.

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Infographic: Can Your Network Handle Healthcare Technology Shifts?

August 8th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

When patient lives are at stake, every connection matters. Evolving technologies enable healthcare innovation—unless an underperforming network slows progress. These healthcare technology shifts may affect your network in the future, according to a new infographic by Spectrum Enterprise.

The infographic examines how technology is changing healthcare and the network requirements under these new scenarios.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient MonitoringArtificial intelligence. Automation. Blockchain. Robotics.

Once the domain of science fiction, these telehealth technologies have begun to transform the fabric of healthcare delivery systems. As further proof of telehealth’s explosive growth, the use of wearable health-tracking devices and remote patient monitoring has proliferated, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has added several new provider telehealth billing codes for calendar year 2018.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring delivers the latest actionable telehealth and remote patient monitoring metrics on tools, applications, challenges, successes and ROI from healthcare organizations across the care spectrum. This 60-page report, now in its fifth edition, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and remote patient monitoring initiatives as well as the use of emerging technologies in the healthcare space.

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Infographic: How Big Data Will Unlock the Potential of Healthcare

August 6th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

The amount of medical data generated each year is rising astronomically. Understanding how to connect that data for new growth opportunities, greater efficiency and better serving consumer needs is a pressing challenge for healthcare organizations, according to a new infographic by Publicis Health.

The infographic examines these data trends and how healthcare organizations can successfully activate data.

UnityPoint Health has moved from a siloed approach to improving the patient experience at each of its locations to a system-wide approach that encompasses a consistent, baseline experience while still allowing for each institution to address its specific needs.

Armed with data from its Press Ganey and CAHPS® Hospital Survey scores, UnityPoint’s patient experience team developed a front-line staff-driven improvement action plan.

Improving the Patient Experience: Engaging Front-line Staff for a System-Wide Action Plan, a 45-minute webinar on July 27th, now available for replay, Paige Moore, director, patient experience at UnityPoint Health—Des Moines, shares how the organization switched from a top-down, leadership-driven patient experience improvement approach to one that engages front-line staff to own the process.

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Guest Post: A Report on Healthcare Data Security & Privacy Compliance

July 26th, 2018 by Gary Palgon

Privacy and security regulations for enterprise data in healthcare organizations are complex and current efforts to bolster enterprise data compliance among all organizations, including those in healthcare, are immature and ineffective, according to a recent study conducted by Aberdeen, an industry analyst firm.

In fact, 86 percent of 112 hospitals and hospital groups in the study are dealing with multiple types of data and data-related processes that are subject to compliance requirements. This is not surprising because healthcare organizations generate, collect, store and manage financial transactions, personally identifiable information, protected health information, employee records and confidential or intellectual property records such as partnership agreements and contracts.

When asked if their organizations were compliant with 11 common regulations and frameworks for data privacy and security, only 65 percent reported achievement. PHI has the highest percentage of compliance reported—85 percent. The lowest compliance rates were reported for ISO 27001 and the General Data Protection Regulation at 63 percent and 48 percent respectively.

To measure the maturity of healthcare organizations’ efforts to comply with privacy and security requirements for data, Aberdeen developed a Net Maturity Index across six key elements of an enterprise data lifecycle. An index score above 50 percent indicates strong maturity in compliance activities and below 50 percent indicates immaturity.

Managing data, which includes normalizing, cleansing, validating and correlating data, earned a 66.6 percent score for healthcare respondents, the only element that indicated maturity. Scores for other key elements were:

  • 49 percent for storing data—persistent, on-demand, self-service access to data;
  • 41.2 percent for protecting data—encryption, tokenization;
  • 33.4 percent for syndicating data between any two applications—including mobile, connected devices, on-premises or cloud;
  • 25.4 percent for ingesting data into a common repository—cloud-based, data lakes; and
  • 3.9 percent for integrating data from multiple sources—disparate sources, formats and protocols

The immaturity of the data lifecycle and associated enterprise data compliance efforts has real-world consequences for healthcare entities. Four out of five (81 percent) study participants reported at least one data privacy and non-compliance issue in the past year, and two out of three (66 percent) reported at least one data breach in the past year.

Investment in data compliance efforts is not lacking. A median of 37 percent of the overall IT budget of healthcare survey respondents is allocated to data compliance activities. This is a significant amount of funding to still experience data breaches, data compliance issues and low percentage of achievement of compliance with multiple enterprise data security and privacy regulations. When compared to respondents from life science and other industries, healthcare respondents reported the highest percentage of the IT budget devoted to data compliance.

The survey also indicated that healthcare organizations are more likely than organizations in other industries to have instituted compliance-specific governance processes and appointed specialized leadership such as data protection officers, compliance officers or chief risk officers, to oversee enterprise data compliance initiatives. While these are often considered to be best practices for achieving data compliance, still less than half of all healthcare organizations have instituted these approaches. Having specialized leadership is one of the most likely ways to effectively address enterprise data security and privacy compliance issues but it may also present further complications. Although the role may be assigned to an individual, the task of ensuring compliance with multiple regulations that evolve and change along with new technology and the addition of new data sources, requires an expertise that is difficult to achieve and oversee by one person who probably wears multiple hats in the organization.

One solution to the complex, challenging task of achieving data security and privacy compliance is the use of third-party providers who can address the healthcare organization’s need to enhance integration, management and storage of data. Providers who are experts at data management and integration but also provide the added value of the expertise needed to ensure compliance with regulatory requirements affecting data will offset some of the burden on hospital staff. The solution is not a simple application or a one-off project. Achieving and sustaining compliance with data privacy and security rules as they evolve is an ongoing effort.

The study also points to the need to better manage financial investment in compliance strategies. One option for healthcare organizations is managed services agreements with data management and integration providers. Switching to a predictable, monthly fee versus periodic capital investment or ongoing efforts that are ineffective frees IT funds to be used to advance other hospital goals.

Although many healthcare organizations do not consider outsourcing some of their data management, integration and compliance challenges, but choosing a partner wisely—one with expertise in healthcare as well as other data-centric industries with multiple privacy and security requirements—can reduce the compliance burden on an already overworked hospital IT staff and make funds available to continue digital transformation or other strategic initiatives.

Read the overall survey report here: Enterprise Data in 2018: The State of Privacy and Security Compliance

Read the brief on results for healthcare organizations here: Enterprise Data in 2018: The State of Privacy and Security Compliance in Healthcare

About the Author:

Gary Palgon

Gary Palgon

Gary Palgon is vice president of healthcare and life sciences solutions at Liaison Technologies. In this role, Gary leverages more than two decades of product management, sales, and marketing experience to develop and expand Liaison’s data-inspired solutions for the healthcare and life sciences. His unique blend of expertise bridges the gap between the technical and business aspects of healthcare, data security, and electronic commerce.

Infographic: Doctors Call for Overhaul of Electronic Health Records

July 6th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Physicians want substantial improvements in the way electronic health records (EHRs) work, according to a new infographic by Stanford Medicine based on a survey conducted by The Harris Poll.

The infographic examines how physicians would like to see EHRs evolve.

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results Between Medicare’s aggressive migration to value-based payment models and MACRA’s 2017 Quality Payment Program rollout, healthcare providers must accept the inevitability of participation in fee-for-quality reimbursement design—as well as cultivating a grounding in health data analytics to enhance success.

As an early adopter of the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) and the largest sponsor of MSSP accountable care organizations (ACOs), Collaborative Health Systems (CHS) is uniquely positioned to advise providers on the benefits of data analytics and technology, which CHS views as a major driver in its achievements in the MSSP arena. In performance year 2014, nine of CHS’s 24 MSSP ACOs generated savings and received payments of almost $27 million.

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results documents the accomplishments of CHS’s 24 ACOs under the MSSP program, the crucial role of data analytics in CHS operations, and the many lessons learned as an early trailblazer in value-based care delivery.

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HINfographic: Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring: No Limit to Where ‘Doctor Will See You Now’

March 14th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

No longer reserved for rural populations, telehealth is proving a game-changer across the care continuum, as telepsychiatry, tele-ERs, tele-ICUs and even telepharmacies proliferate. Telehealth adoption rose from 63 percent in 2015 to 74 percent in 2018, according to the latest Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring Survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

A new infographic by the Healthcare Intelligence Network examines clinical telehealth uses, telehealth-EHR integration and the use of free and/or discounted healthcare wearables.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient MonitoringArtificial intelligence. Automation. Blockchain. Robotics. Once the domain of science fiction, these telehealth technologies have begun to transform the fabric of healthcare delivery systems. As further proof of telehealth’s explosive growth, the use of wearable health-tracking devices and remote patient monitoring has proliferated, and the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has added several new provider telehealth billing codes for calendar year 2018.

2018 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Remote Patient Monitoring delivers the latest actionable telehealth and remote patient monitoring metrics on tools, applications, challenges, successes and ROI from healthcare organizations across the care spectrum. This 60-page report, now in its fifth edition, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and remote patient monitoring initiatives as well as the use of emerging technologies in the healthcare space. Click here for more information.

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Guest Post: Patient Engagement Technology Tool for Preventing Hospital Readmissions in Chronic Patients

January 23rd, 2018 by Allison Hart, Vice President of Marketing, TeleVox Solutions at West

While almost all chronic care patients say they need help managing their disease, less than one-third receive regular check-ins from healthcare providers.

During the past decade, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services have increased the pressure on hospitals to prevent readmissions. In response to that pressure, many hospitals made changes that have led to declines in readmission rates. However, even with more measures in place to prevent readmissions than ever before, the risk of being readmitted to the hospital is still high for patients with chronic illnesses.

Studies have shown that the risk of adverse health effects increases with each hospitalization. Unfortunately, it can be difficult to keep chronic patients from readmitting once they have been hospitalized. Because of this, it is important that healthcare teams prioritize chronic disease management, and work to engage and support chronic patients. One tool that can help with this is the patient engagement technology many healthcare teams already have in place.

Survey responses indicate that chronic patients welcome efforts from their healthcare team that are aimed at managing disease and preventing hospital admissions and readmissions. A West survey found that 91 percent of chronic patients say they need help managing their disease, and at least 70 percent would like more resources or clarity on how to manage their condition. Additionally, 75 percent of chronic patients want their healthcare provider to touch base with them regularly so they can be alerted of potential issues.

Although patients with chronic conditions have expressed that they desire more assistance from their healthcare providers, they are not necessarily receiving it. For example, more than half (54 percent) of patients feel a weekly or twice-weekly check-in from their provider would be valuable, yet only 30 percent of patients report receiving regular check-ins. This shows that, in some cases, providers could be doing much more to offer ongoing chronic disease management support.

Providers seem to be underestimating patients’ interest in chronic care and their desire to receive support. Patients have suggested that they not only want assistance with managing chronic conditions, they would also be willing to pay for that extra support. Many providers are unaware that their patients feel this way. When asked if their patients would agree to pay 10 dollars per month for additional chronic care support, just over half (53 percent) of providers answered “yes.” However, two-thirds of patients say they would be willing to pay a nominal amount for chronic care support. The eye-opening response from patients confirms that chronic disease management is in demand—more so than providers realize. It also suggests that some providers may need to do more to offer ongoing chronic disease management support.

Chronic Care Management Enrollment

One way healthcare teams can better serve chronic patients and potentially prevent readmissions is by enrolling patients in chronic disease management programs. Chronic care programs, like Medicare’s Chronic Care Management program, require a lot of communication on the part of the healthcare team. Automating some of the communication and outreach makes it easier for providers to offer ongoing chronic care support. Healthcare teams can use their patient engagement technology to:

  • Send patients messages to invite them to enroll in a chronic care program. Using information from electronic health records, healthcare teams can identify patients that are eligible for chronic care management programs. (Patients must have two or more chronic conditions to enroll in Medicare’s Chronic Care Management program.) Then, they can use their patient engagement technology to send patients automated messages with information about the benefits of participating in a chronic care program, and instructions or links for patients to enroll or get further information.
  • Schedule disease-specific preventive screenings and tests. The Chronic Care Management program mandates that patients receive recommended preventive services. Care managers can schedule and send patients automated text messages, emails or voice messages to notify them when they are due for preventive screenings and tests. Patients with diabetes, for example, would automatically receive messages when they are due for an A1C test, foot exam or eye exam.
  • Send medication reminders and messages. Providers are required to manage and reconcile medications for patients enrolled in the Chronic Care Management program. Providers can assign medication reminders and send automated messages to ensure patients know how and when to take their medication, and that they don’t forget to take it.

Communication that engages chronic patients and aids them in disease management can result in better health outcomes and fewer readmissions. Engagement communications can be easily automated, meaning outreach does not require excessive time or resources. Hospitals and healthcare providers have incentives to reduce readmissions, and in many cases, they have the technology in place to make chronic disease management efficient and effective.

About the Author: Allison Hart is a regularly published advocate for utilizing technology-enabled communications to engage and activate patients beyond the clinical setting. She leads thought leadership efforts for West’s TeleVox Solutions, promoting the idea that engaging with patients between healthcare appointments in meaningful ways will encourage and inspire them to follow and embrace treatment plans – and that activating these positive behaviors ultimately leads to better outcomes for both healthcare organizations and patients. Hart currently serves as Vice President of Marketing for TeleVox Solutions at West, where the healthcare mission is to help organizations harness communications to expand the boundaries of where, when, and how healthcare is delivered.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Infographic: Hospital CIOs’ 2018 Priorities

January 15th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Hospital CIOs are wrestling with a wide range of technology challenges, according to a new infographic by Spok.

The infographic details the trop priorities of hospital CIOs this year, including the progress toward a mobile health strategy.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

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