Archive for the ‘e-Health’ Category

Infographic: Medicine, Millennials and Mobile

March 20th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Telehealth is becoming a bigger part of the U.S. medical landscape each year, according to a new infographic by URAC.

The infographic examines the growing number of businesses that currently offer or plan to offer telehealth benefits as part of their employee health benefit package and the key driver of this expansion.

Real-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation's (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients' A1C blood glucose levels.

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Infographic: Technology and the 21st-Century Medicine Bag

March 6th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

The traditional clinician's medicine bag is now a thing of the past, but its replacement promises to be even more useful as a means of facilitating better patient care, according to a new infographic by Transcend Insight. Now, a doctor's visit is facilitated via laptop or with a smartphone -- technologies and products of healthcare innovation.

Healthcare innovation, in fact, is transforming everything from how physicians diagnose and treat their patients to how healthcare systems are reimbursed for their services. Here’s a quick look at how that transformation is unfolding, and how four key technologies in particular have become critical components of modern-day medicine.

Technology and the 21st-Century Medicine Bag

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today. Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Telemedicine Is Transforming Healthcare

January 30th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Telemedicine is one of the fastest growing sectors in healthcare. With increased pressure worldwide on improving the efficiency of care delivery and reducing costs, this growth is expected to be even more explosive in the next five years, according to a new infographic by ADROITENT.

The infographic looks at the impact of telemedicine, factors driving telemedicine growth and the benefits of telemedicine.

Remote Patient Monitoring To Drive Results in Value-Based ReimbursementAfter testing remote patient monitoring programs at a pilot level through its Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation, the University of Pennsylvania Health System and School of Medicine is scaling out some of these programs to the health system level.

As healthcare organizations take on more risk for patients beyond their healthcare walls in value-based reimbursement models, the ability to monitor patients remotely to identify problems before they escalate is becoming critical.

During Remote Patient Monitoring To Drive Results in Value-Based Reimbursement, a 45-minute webinar on March 8th at 1:30 p.m. Eastern time, Katy Mahraj, innovation manager, Penn Medicine Center for Health Care Innovation, will share how her organization develops, test and implements new health improvement technologies and strategies using rapid cycle innovation.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today. Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: How Healthcare Technology is Disrupting the Traditional Market

October 19th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Technology now has a role in nearly every aspect of a person's life, including healthcare, according to a new infographic by Minute Women.

The infographic examines how technology is being used in healthcare, global investments in healthcare technology companies and investment categories and the reasons for health technology growth.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Hospital Health IT Use in Maryland

September 16th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

All of Maryland's acute care hospitals use a certified electronic health record (EHR), according to a new infographic by the Maryland Health Care Commission.

The infographic examines the top three EHR vendors in use in Maryland, as well as the use of patient portals, IT for population health management and telehealth and the number of hospitals participating in health information exchanges.

While widespread adoption of electronic health records has generated new streams of actionable patient data, John C. Lincoln has taken data mining to new levels to enhance performance of its accountable care organization (ACO).

Beyond the EMR: Mining Population Health Analytics to Elevate Accountable Care reviews the concentrated data dig undertaken by John C. Lincoln to prepare for participation in the CMS Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP).

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Infographic: Virtual Health Trends

August 8th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

With looming physician shortages, healthcare coverage expansions and increasing consumer demand for convenient care, virtual health is primed for future growth, according to a new infographic by SG2.

The infographic examines consumer demand for virtual health and the steps healthcare providers should take before implementing virtual health options.

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care ManagementReal-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation's (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients' A1C blood glucose levels.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

HINfographic: Digital Health Connects Complex Comorbid to Care Management

June 27th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

In evaluating candidates to engage in digital health, those with chronic comorbidities are prime targets, say 58 percent of respondents to the 2016 Digital Health Survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Diabetes tops the list of chronic conditions ripe for connected health interventions, report 58 percent.

A new infographic by HIN examines which populations are targeted by digital health initiatives, the percent of healthcare organizations that have adopted digital health and how digital health programs are staffed.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital Health2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital Health assembles hundreds of metrics on digital health strategies from hospitals, health insurers, physician practices and other responding organizations, charting the growth of digital health and its expanding role in population health management.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital Health examines program goals, platforms, components, development strategies, target populations and health conditions, patient engagement metrics, results and challenges reported by more than 100 healthcare organizations responding to the February 2016 Digital Health survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Click here for more information.

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Guest Post: 5 Ways to Protect Against Cyber Attacks

February 23rd, 2016 by Salim Hafid, product marketing manager, Bitglass

Cyber attacks like the recent hack of Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center are on the rise.

Editor's Note: Could the Hollywood hack happen to your organization?

The event had all the hallmarks of a Hollywood blockbuster, but this month's assault by a hacker on Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center (HPMC) was frighteningly real. The malware attack locked access to certain computer systems and prevented the medical center from sharing communications electronically, according to a statement by Allen Stefanek, President & CEO. The medical center paid the requested ransom—40 Bitcoins, equal to approximately $17,000—and restored its electronic medical record (EMR) system. There is no evidence at this time that any patient or employee information was subject to unauthorized access, Stefanek said in his statement.

The HPMC hack is only the latest cyber attack to plague the industry. In this guest blog post, Salim Hafid, product marketing manager for Bitglass, suggests ways organizations can safeguard themselves against these damaging events.

Data breaches in 2015 resulted in a massive 113 million leaked records nationwide, up from 12 million in 2014, according to Bitglass’ Healthcare Breach Report. This means that one in three Americans’ personal information was leaked as a result of cyber attacks. The increase suggests that hackers are increasingly targeting medical records, which contain a trove of valuable information including addresses, Social Security numbers, and patients’ medical history. As hackers become more sophisticated, IT must take steps to secure data both in the cloud and across all employee devices.

Given the rising threat of cyber attacks, healthcare organizations must be proactive when it comes to securing corporate data. Here are five ways IT can both protect healthcare data in the cloud and limit the risk of a large-scale breach:

1. Control access.

Cloud applications have made file-sharing and access to data easier than ever, but for all the flexibility these apps offer, there are risks to sharing files with unsecured, unmanaged devices outside the corporate network. Granular access controls are a critical piece of the security puzzle in that organizations need the ability to limit access in certain risky contexts. In the case of the Anthem breach for example—in which phished credentials were used in China, resulting in 78.8 million leaked records—access controls would have limited the damage.

2. Encrypt, track, protect.

The most sensitive data in an organization is often the most valuable to hackers. Files with customer Social Security numbers, addresses, and medical claims information are the targets of large-scale breaches. To secure data, IT needs a means to identify the files that contain sensitive content and apply Data Loss Prevention (DLP) to those files. Contextual DLP solutions enable IT administrators to distinguish between devices and set policies to encrypt, apply watermarks to track data, or even wrap files with digital rights management (DRM).

3. Secure BYOD.

As demand for bring-your-own-device (BYOD) in healthcare rises, organizations need to protect data on unmanaged devices without impeding user privacy. What is critical here is control over data as it travels to the end-user’s device and data that resides on the device itself. With features like selective wipe and native mail access, organizations can encourage adoption of BYOD while still protecting data and maintaining HIPAA compliance on these unmanaged devices.

4. Quickly identify potential breaches.

As healthcare organizations are now more likely to be targeted by hackers than ever before, IT needs the ability to quickly identify suspicious traffic and be alerted to potential risks. Administrators can leverage tools like cloud access security brokers to act on that information and limit sharing using the aforementioned access control capabilities.

5. Improve authentication.

Major breaches like Anthem and Premera, coupled with the low rate of single sign-on adoption across the healthcare industry, highlight the need for a more secure means of authenticating users. With an integrated identity solution, organizations can maintain control over the key access points to their data and can easily manage user account credentials with tools like Active Directory. Industry standards like single sign-on, multi-factor authentication, and single-use passwords can also help minimize risk of breaches due to stolen credentials.

These are just a few of the many ways healthcare organizations can better secure corporate data in public cloud applications like Google Apps, Box, and Office 365. In light of the massive year-on-year increase in breaches, securing healthcare data has never been more critical. Healthcare organizations need a HIPAA-compliant, comprehensive, data-centric solution that provides complete control and visibility over protected health information (PHI), a means of securely authenticating users, and BYOD security.

Download the Bitglass Healthcare Breach Report for more on the key capabilities necessary to protect healthcare data in the cloud and achieve compliance.

About Bitglass: In a world of cloud applications and mobile devices, IT must secure corporate data that resides on third-party servers and travels over third-party networks to employee-owned mobile devices. Existing security technologies are simply not suited to solving this task, since they were developed to secure the corporate network perimeter. The Bitglass Cloud Access Security Broker solution transcends the network perimeter to deliver total data protection for the enterprise—in the cloud, on mobile devices and anywhere on the Internet. For more information, visit bitglass.com

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Infographic: What Makes a Successful mHealth App?

December 30th, 2015 by Melanie Matthews

With over 10,000 medical apps available today, only 28 percent of smartphone users have reported to be very satisfied with the overall mHealth app quality and experience, according to a new infographic by Vigyanix.

The infographic details the components of a successful mHealth app and the pitfalls to avoid.

Despite reimbursement challenges, the healthcare industry is charged up about remote patient monitoring to manage chronic illness: two-thirds of respondents to HIN's 2015 Telehealth and Telemedicine survey monitor high-risk patients in this fashion. Encouraged by early success in coaching 23 patients to wellness at home via remote monitoring, CHRISTUS Health expanded its remote patient monitoring (RPM) enrollment to 170 high-risk, high-cost patients. At that scaling-up juncture, the challenge for CHRISTUS shifted to balancing its mission of keeping patients healthy and in their homes with maintaining revenue streams sufficient to keep its doors open in a largely fee-for-service environment.

Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management: Leveraging Technology in a Value-Based System chronicles the evolution of the CHRISTUS RPM pilot, which is framed around a Bluetooth®-enabled monitoring kit sent home with patients at hospital discharge.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Telehealth, Wearables Tighten Provider-Patient Connection

June 16th, 2015 by Patricia Donovan

Remote monitoring of high-risk individuals engages patients in self-care of chronic illness.

It’s become a mantra in healthcare: “Meet patients where they are.”

The emergent field of telehealth helps to make this a reality. Almost two-thirds of respondents to this year's Telehealth and Telemedicine Survey have a direct connection to patients and health plan members in their homes via remote monitoring—a vital telehealth strategy for management of high-risk, high-cost populations that continues to surge in popularity.

Our fourth comprehensive Telehealth survey captured dozens of data points and trends, including how the use of ‘vintage’ tools like fax machines and land lines for telehealth delivery has given way to wireless and smart phone technologies patients carry on their person 24/7. Wireless telehealth applications jumped 13 percent in two years, respondents tell us, while telemedicine smart phone apps increased by 10 percent.

And let us not forget the wearables: 26 percent of healthcare respondents embrace this category of personal devices that are buckled or strapped onto the individuals whose care they manage and programmed to transmit health and fitness data. We can only speculate how the Apple® Watch, with its three rings that provide a visual snapshot of the wearer’s daily activity, will impact wearables metrics once the device debuts this summer.

High-tech obsessions and gadget-heads aside, telehealth live-streams care to populations needing it most: rural residents requiring specialist diagnostics but perhaps lacking the means or time to travel to the office of an orthopedist or a dermatologist, two specialties that participate in a groundbreaking multi-specialty telehealth collaborative in California.

Though telehealth faces a bandwidth worth of barriers, not the least of which are reimbursement and physician engagement, it’s exciting to visualize what this year’s respondents have in store for populations they serve. If the plans they shared come to fruition, telehealth in 2015 will variously link veterans, the mentally ill, women with high-risk pregnancies, pediatric patients and even employees at work sites to a hub of remote services designed to integrate care and boost population health outcomes.

Stay tuned.

Source: 2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine

Telehealth & Telemedicine

2015 Healthcare Benchmarks: Telehealth & Telemedicine delivers actionable new telehealth metrics on technologies, program components, successes and ROI from 115 healthcare organizations. This 60-page report, now in its fourth year, documents benchmarks on current and planned telehealth and telemedicine initiatives, with historical perspective from 2009 to present.