Archive for the ‘Data Analytics’ Category

Mounting Pressure from Value-Based Reimbursement Models Drives Clinical Improvement Strategy at Allina Health System

April 17th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Value-Based Reimbursement Models Drive Clinical Improvement Strategy

As a greater percentage of hospital payments are through value-based contracts, hospitals that reduce costs while maintaining quality will survive, predicts Pam Rush, cardiovascular clinical service line program director at Allina Health.

“How do we improve outcomes and decrease costs?” Rush asked participants in the March 2018 webinar, Predictive Healthcare Analytics: Four Pillars for Success. “We need to start to look at the world differently.”

How can we be more creative and do things differently? How can we use different members of the healthcare teams in new ways, such as nurse practitioners or advanced practice providers, she added. In addition, “we need to invest in data analytics and data resources and have data analysts who can pull the information for us so we can find the variation. We need to invest in physician and caregiver time to look at the data, to make changes in how they improve care, to monitor and see what is working and what doesn’t work.”

These four pillars…population health management, reducing clinical variation, testing new care processes and new models of payment, and leveraging cutting edge technologies…have been critical to the work at Allina Health System’s Minneapolis Heart Institute Center for Healthcare Delivery Innovation, said Rush.

In population health management, we’re looking at how can we focus on adherence to guidelines, identify where there are gaps in care and partner with people across the system, primary care and specialists, to improve consistency and adherence to guidelines, she explained.

Allina is reducing clinical variation by looking at unnecessary variations in care where there is inconsistent care without an influence on outcomes.

“We’re also looking at new ways of doing things. How can we use our nurse practitioners, how do we care for patients once they’re discharged from the hospital and bring them back in for clinic visits? It’s really looking at the care model and how we can do things differently to reduce total cost of care,” she said.

In cardiology, there are so many new devices, procedures and techniques to monitor, said Rush, but we need to figure out who are the right providers to do that monitoring, who are the right patients to do these expensive procedures on and who achieves the best outcomes, because we can’t afford to do all of this new technology to every single person.

Allina looks at these four pillars across the continuum. Starting in primary care to partner on prevention strategies, moving to who gets referred to cardiology, and when they’re referred to cardiology, what are the set of tests or treatments and guidelines to adhere to along the continuum to subspecialties, emergency services and all the way up through advanced therapies, such as transplant.

During the webinar, Rush along with Dr. Steven Bradley, cardiologist, MHI and associate director, MHI Healthcare Delivery Innovation Center, shared these four pillars of predictive analytics success along with details on creating a culture of quality and innovation, building performance improvement dashboards, as well as several case examples of quality improvement initiatives contributing to these savings and much more.

Listen to Ms. Rush describe how MHI leveraged an enterprise data warehouse to identify care gaps and clinical quality improvement opportunities.

Guest Post: Outcomes Drive the Evidence-Based Practice Journey

March 29th, 2018 by Michele Farrington and Cindy Dawson

The Institute of Medicine set a goal that 90 percent of all healthcare decisions will be evidence-based by 2020. Executives and nursing leaders, at all levels within organizations, have clear responsibility for making this goal a reality and ensuring consistent, standardized use of evidence-based practice (EBP) in care delivery that will meet patient, family, clinician, and organizational outcomes.

Promoting use of evidence, valuing questioning of clinical and administrative practice, and building organizational capacity, culture, and commitment are pivotal to building a supportive organizational culture related to EBP.

Organizations must meet regulatory requirements, from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and The Joint Commission, that incorporate EBPs and the need for increasing public accountability and transparency (e.g., use of national benchmarks) for quality and safety. Financial incentives associated with pay-for-performance are also directly linked to EBP. Despite these outside forces in today’s healthcare environment, clinicians and executives cannot forget about the need to provide individualized patient care, which includes patient engagement strategies aimed at improving the overall patient experience.

EBP is a continuous journey for individual clinicians and organizations alike and starts with building organizational capacity.

Organizational Capacity

EBP capacity is built using a strategic, systematic approach to create a solid foundation and infrastructure to support the work. Before EBP work can be successful at the unit or clinic level, EBP must be integrated at the organizational level and a culture for change must exist.

The organization’s mission, vision, and strategic plan must include EBP language to ensure evidence-based healthcare is clearly portrayed as the organizational norm. Creating a culture valuing inquiry and innovation must start during orientation for new hires and continue during competency review for current employees and through ongoing training and professional development opportunities for both clinicians and executive leaders.

An infrastructure that directly integrates EBP work into the organizational governance structure is needed to support the mission, vision, and strategic plan. A crucial organizational decision is determining what group will hold primary accountability or functional responsibility for EBP to ensure it is integrated into practice processes, policies, and documentation.

Recruiting and hiring clinicians and executives with experience and/or interest in EBP will help build the desired culture and capacity. EBP mentors are developed from successful projects and are used to nurture the next generation.

A well-defined path for EBP includes adoption of an EBP-process model to guide implementation and sustained organizational change across disciplines. There are a number of EBP process models: The Iowa Model Revised: Evidence-Based Practice to Promote Excellence in Health Care; Johns Hopkins Nursing Evidence-Based Practice Model; Stetler Model of Evidence-Based Practice; and Advancing Research and Clinical Practice Through Close Collaboration (ARCC) Model. Each model follows a step-by-step problem-solving process suitable for concurrent use with the organization’s quality improvement processes.

Culture

The governance structure must clearly outline the process and channels for communicating EBP work and obtaining necessary approvals from applicable committees. EBP discussions should be a regular agenda item for all shared governance committees.

Project results should be reported internally through the organization’s shared governance and quality improvement structures to promote practice change adoption, share learning, garner continued support (e.g., time, resources), and as a platform to recognize success for the institution’s EBP program.

Successful EBP work takes time and effort, so successes should be celebrated and rewarded throughout the process. Celebrations are an opportunity to spotlight clinicians for doing this work and helps build a pervasive culture that supports and expects use of evidence in practice. These strategies promote organizational buy-in and commitment for the EBP process and set higher standards as a foundation for future efforts.

Expected behaviors from clinicians across all job classifications at every level must clearly demonstrate the value of EBP. Behavioral expectations regarding EBP are easily set if they are built into every job description and can be quickly reviewed annually during the performance appraisal process. Utilizing documents and mechanisms that already occur is an easy and efficient way to promote positive reinforcement and priority setting in busy work environments with many ongoing and competing demands for clinicians’ and leaders’ time and attention.

Benefits

EBP is value-added with a strong return on investment and responds to current priorities. A single project may improve patient and clinician safety, improve clinical outcomes, improve patient/family satisfaction, promote innovate care, and/or reduce costs.

Clinicians, nurses, and leaders all influence an organization’s capacity for EBP. Leaders who demonstrate and expect EBP will promote its use in clinical and operational decision-making at the unit or clinic and organizational levels. Building on the organization’s mission, vision, capacity, and value for delivery of reliable, safe, high quality care provides a foundation for success.

About the Authors:

Michele Farrington, BSN, RN, CPHON, is a clinical healthcare research associate at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. She is certified in pediatric hematology/oncology nursing and received her BSN from the University of Iowa. She has been leading, co-leading, or mentoring EBP initiatives since 2003, and her work has been awarded extramural funding, validating the strength of the projects and impact on nursing care. She is widely published and has given multiple local, regional, national, and international presentations.

Cindy Dawson, MSN, RN, CORLN, is the chief nurse executive and associate director of the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. She received her BSN from the University of Iowa, MSN from the University of Phoenix, and is a Certified Otorhinolaryngology Nurse. Over the course of her career, she has published extensively on EBP, nurse triage, nursing management/leadership, and clinical practice guidelines and has given numerous local, regional, national, and international presentations on these topics.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Infographic: Statewide Health Information Network for New York

March 23rd, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

The Statewide Health Information Network for New York (SHIN-NY) is a statewide network that facilitates secure and confidential sharing of patient data across the healthcare system to improve outcomes. The SHIN-NY is comprised of eight Qualified Entities (QEs) that are regional health information exchanges, according to a new infographic by the New York eHealth Collaborative, which leads the advancement of SHIN-NY.

The infographic examines how SHIN-NY works, the information that can be shared and the benefits to patients and providers.

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results Between Medicare’s aggressive migration to value-based payment models and MACRA’s 2017 Quality Payment Program rollout, healthcare providers must accept the inevitability of participation in fee-for-quality reimbursement design—as well as cultivating a grounding in health data analytics to enhance success.

As an early adopter of the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) and the largest sponsor of MSSP accountable care organizations (ACOs), Collaborative Health Systems (CHS) is uniquely positioned to advise providers on the benefits of data analytics and technology, which CHS views as a major driver in its achievements in the MSSP arena. In performance year 2014, nine of CHS’s 24 MSSP ACOs generated savings and received payments of almost $27 million.

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results examines program goals, platforms, components, development strategies, target populations and health conditions, patient engagement metrics, results and challenges reported by more than 100 healthcare organizations responding to the February 2016 Digital Health survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

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Essentia Health Virtual Telemedicine Services Support Rural Hospitals and Clinics

March 13th, 2018 by Patricia Donovan

Essentia Health conducts 5,000 virtual visits annually.

There may be some challenges associated with Essentia Health’s comprehensive telemedicine program, but provider engagement isn’t one of them.

“In the seven years I have been with Essentia Health, I have not gone to any provider to ask them to do telehealth,” notes Maureen Ideker, RN, BSN, MBA, the organization’s senior advisor for telehealth. Instead, physicians seek out Ms. Ideker, asking to be connected to any of Essentia Health’s six hospital-based and more than 20 clinic-based telehealth services.

Such robust telemedicine adoption among Essentia Health’s more than 800 physicians may be one reason why the organization averages 5,000 virtual visits annually, and why it has another 10 to 20 new telehealth offerings in development, according to Ms. Ideker’s presentation during Telemedicine Across the Care Continuum: Boosting Health Clinic Revenue and Closing Care Gaps.

The largely rural footprint of Essentia Health, which touches the three states of Minnesota, Wisconsin and North Dakota, is ideally suited to telehealth implementation. During this March 2018 webinar, which is now available for rebroadcast, Ms. Ideker outlined her organization’s telehealth program models, history of program development, and equipment and staffing requirements. She also shared key program outcomes, such as the impact of remote patient monitoring on hospital readmissions and clinic ROI from telehealth.

For example, the 30-day readmission rate for Essentia Health patients with heart failure remotely monitored at home is 2 percent, versus its non-monitored heart failure patients (9 percent) and the national 30-day readmissions average of 24 percent.

Essentia Health’s hospital-based telemedicine began with an emergency room platform, which includes pediatric ER and pharmacy and toxicology and a soon-to-be-added behavioral health component. Today, hospitalist and stroke care are the largest of Essentia Health’s hospital-based telemedicine programs, explained Ms. Ideker. These virtual services support Essentia Health’s rural hospitals in five key ways, including the avoidance of unnecessary patient transfers.

On the outpatient side, the 20-something tele-clinic based services developed by Essentia Health over the last seven years run the gamut from allergy and infant audiology to urology and vascular conditions, she explained. Her organization’s telemedicine approach to opioid tapering is catching on across Minnesota, she added.

And while it is appreciative of its providers’ enthusiasm, Essentia Health approaches telehealth development with precision, consulting data analytics such as metrics on annual health screenings to create target groups for new services. The launching of a new telemedicine service can take up to twelve weeks, using a 75-item checklist and an implementation retreat and walk-through, Ms. Ideker explained.

In closing, Ms. Ideker shared several innovation stories from its portfolio of telehealth offerings, including Code Weather, employed during hazardous weather for patient safety reasons and to reduce cancellations of appointments, and a gastroenterology initiative designed to reduce no-show rates.

Listen to Maureen Ideker explain how Essentia Health pairs remote patients with hospital- and clinic-based telehealth services.

Infographic: The Current State of Healthcare Predictive Analytics

March 12th, 2018 by Melanie Matthews

Most organizations sit on a wealth of healthcare data but raw data in itself is not enough to drive down costs and reduce risk, according to a new infographic by Advanced Plan for Health.

The infographic examines how to leverage predictive analytics to improve key areas of cost and risk including wellness programs, case management and telehealth use.

Predictive Healthcare Analytics: Four Pillars for SuccessWith an increasing percentage of at-risk healthcare payments, the Allina Health System’s Minneapolis Heart Institute began to drill down on the reasons for clinical variations among its cardiovascular patients. The Heart Institute’s Center for Healthcare Delivery Innovation, charged with analyzing and reducing unnecessary clinical variation, has saved over $155 million by reducing this unnecessary clinical variation through its predictive analytics programs.

During Predictive Healthcare Analytics: Four Pillars for Success, a 45-minute webinar on March 29th at 1:30 p.m. Eastern, Pam Rush, cardiovascular clinical service line program director at Allina Health, and Dr. Steven Bradley, cardiologist, Minneapolis Heart Institute (MHI) and associate director, MHI Healthcare Delivery Innovation Center, will share their organization’s four pillars of predictive analytics success…addressing population health issues, reducing clinical variation, testing new processes and leveraging an enterprise data warehouse. Click here for more information.

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Guest Post: Real-Time Data Analytics Key to Decreasing Denial Rates, Saving Time and Lowering Costs

February 22nd, 2018 by Jonathan Farr, Senior Vice President, North America, EFFY

For hospital and health system leaders, financial challenges pose some of the most insurmountable hurdles, with claim denials a significant contributor. Consider the numbers: annual losses from denial write-offs average 5 percent, and up to 15 to 20 percent of initial denials occur with the first billing. The burden of reworking denials not only impedes the revenue cycle process, but can also compromise care quality.

Furthermore, the number of hospital mergers and acquisitions surged by 15 percent between 2016 and 2017. This has generated massive sets of disparate data that must be reconciled and reviewed, creating an environment where the revenue cycle management (RCM) process can be fraught with missteps. As a result, today’s hospital leaders seek new opportunities for maximizing revenue, and identifying solutions that enhance both financial and clinical performance.

Optimizing Revenue Cycle Management

Issues that lead to denials occur throughout the revenue cycle. Certain best practices are helpful for hospitals of every kind and size, such as taking steps to minimize denials up front, managing them through efficient workflows and processes, and analyzing denials after the fact to identify common causes.

Perhaps the most important step hospitals can take is to find the right RCM solution to optimize financial performance—one that doesn’t require replacing an existing and often expensive operating system (OS). The best option is to find a partner that offers an actionable real-time or near real-time data analytics platform that overlays or integrates with the current installations.

Actionable Real-Time Data Analytics

An actionable real-time data analytics platform, especially one powered by an RCM optimization tool that has been proven effective across leading healthcare systems, telecom companies, utilities, retail and other complex industries, can help hospitals significantly minimize denials, and save time and money.

How does an RCM optimization tool work? It can audit and trigger efficiency actions in a way that is non-intrusive to the day-to-day work of the revenue cycle clerical staff. What’s more, this type of solution offers an efficiency platform that overlays an existing system to help healthcare organizations compare massive amounts of data across their total enterprise, detect exceptions and problems, and guide actions and interventions to improve efficiency.

An actionable RCM solution has the reconciliation and analytical tools that help organizations gather and compare data enterprise-wide, detect deviations, issue alerts and offer an integrated workflow to guide the ‘fixes’ they need.

With this solution, hospitals do not have to discard their OS because the RCM solution overlays the current installation, provides the necessary analytics and drives the corrective actions needed. Even better news for hospital leaders, this type of innovative RCM solution eliminates the need for large up-front acquisition costs, representing a financial transaction that does not compromise the bottom line.

Impressive Returns

An RCM solution that uses actionable real-time data analytics and powerful action-driven analytic tools has seen proven results: for one not-for-profit hospital, savings related to denials and write-offs continued to accrue and reached upwards of $800,000 in the first six months of operation.

Furthermore, back-end processes were streamlined, relieving stress and time constraints imposed on the clinical staff. Inadequate documentation of medical necessity was addressed, allowing the hospital to transition charges to patient self-pay or to initiate a change in the course of treatment.

This type of RCM solution represents the future of data analytics, helping hospitals increase net revenue by 3 to 4 percent, with ROI multiples of between eight and ten. It also allows a hospital to use any data from any OS to set up sophisticated validations to detect issues immediately.

By simply overlaying an actionable real-time data analytics system, RCM managers can quickly gain control of aggregated data, and detect/resolve issues that impact revenue integrity, as well as clinical and operational performance, in a way that is truly cost-effective.

About the Author: Jonathan Farr, MHA, is Senior Vice President, North America, for EFFY. Jon has prior experience managing general acute hospitals, surgical hospitals, emergency centric hospitals, behavior health hospitals, and a large physician practice, both for-profit and not for profit, urban and rural, domestic and international. He is highly respected for his ability to work with physicians, boards, committees, regulatory agencies, third party payors, vendors, patients and all levels of personnel. Jon earned a Master’s in hospital administration from the Medical College of Virginia and is a member of the American College of Healthcare Executives.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remains with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

2018 Success Strategy: Differentiate to Survive Next Wave of Healthcare

January 5th, 2018 by Patricia Donovan

Are supermarkets the next wave of healthcare?

Perhaps not, but if a health insurer can move into the community pharmacy, why not the local grocery store?

On the heels of the recent non-traditional CVS Health-Aetna merger and amidst other swirling consolidation rumors, industry thought leaders are encouraging healthcare organizations to embrace similar partnerships and synergies.

And given the presence of pharmacies inside many supermarkets, “there is potential for greater synergies around what we eat, what we buy and how our healthcare is actually purchased or delivered,” suggests David Buchanan, president of Buchanan Strategies.

“The bonanza [from this merger] might be where data can be shared between CVS’s customers and Aetna’s customers and whether we can steer those CVS customers to Aetna,” he added.

Buchanan and Brian Sanderson, managing principal of healthcare services for Crowe Horwath, sketched a roadmap to help healthcare providers and payors navigate the key trends, challenges and opportunities that beckon in 2018 during Trends Shaping the Healthcare Industry in 2018: A Strategic Planning Session, a December 2017 webinar now available for rebroadcast.

Key guideposts on the road to success: data analytics, consolidation, population health management, patient and member engagement, and telemedicine, among other indicators. Also, organizations shouldn’t hesitate to test-drive new roles in order to differentiate themselves in the marketplace.

“If you are not differentiated, you will not survive in what is a very fluid marketplace,” Sanderson advised.

Honing in on the healthcare provider perspective, Sanderson posed five key questions to help shape physician, hospital and health system strategies, including, “What are the powerful patterns?” Industry mergers, an infusion of private equity money into areas like ambulatory care and emerging value-based payment models fall into this category, he suggested.

These patterns were echoed in four primary trends Sanderson outlined as shaping the direction of the healthcare market, which faces an increasingly “impatient” patient. “I could tell you the market wants care everywhere,” he said. “In the same way we have become impatient with our commoditized goods, so have patients become impatient with accessing care.”

Among these trends are “unclear models of reimbursement,” he noted, adding that after a self-imposed “pause” relative to healthcare reimbursement at the start of a new presidential administration, the industry is ready to “restart with some new sponsors now.”

Notably, Sanderson advised providers to embrace population management. “Don’t think population health, think population management. It’s no longer just the clinical aspects of a patient’s or a population’s health. It’s the overall management of their well-being.”

Following Sanderson’s five winning strategies for healthcare provider success, David Buchanan outlined his list of hot-button items for insurers, which ranged from the future of Obamacare and member engagement to telemedicine, healthcare payment costs and models and trends in Medicare and Medicaid.

Healthcare payors should not underestimate the value of engaging its members, who today possess higher levels of health literacy, he stated. “The member must be an integral part of healthcare transactions, as are the provider, the facility and the insurer. The member must have a greater level of personal responsibility and engagement in the process.”

Offering members wearable health technologies like fitness trackers is one way insurers might engage individuals in their health while creating ‘stickiness’ and member allegiance to the health plan.

Telemedicine, the fastest growing healthcare segment, is another means of extending payors’ reach and increasing profitability, he adds. “Telemedicine is not just for rural health settings anymore, but is finding another subset of adopters among people who can’t fit a doctor’s visit into their busy schedule.”

Payors should expect some competition in this area. “I believe the next wave [of telehealth] will be hospitals expanding into local telehealth services as a lead-in to their local clinics,” Buchanan predicted.

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) and robotics in healthcare is growing, but Buchanan and Sanderson agree that adoption will be slow. On the other hand, expect more collaboration between digital players like Amazon, Google and Apple and larger health plans.

“You will see [synergies] when you can put those two players together: the company that can bring the technology to the table as well as those companies that bring the users to the table,” concluded Buchanan.

Listen to a HIN HealthSounds podcast in which David Buchanan predicts the future of mega mergers in healthcare, the impact of the CVS-Aetna alliance on brand awareness, and the real ‘bonanza’ of the $69 billion partnership, beyond bringing healthcare closer to home for many consumers.

Infographic: Impact of New Hypertension Guidelines

November 27th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

OM1, an AI health outcomes and data company, has released an analysis on the impact of the new American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) high blood pressure guidelines. Using the OM1 Intelligent Data Cloud, OM1 performed preliminary analyses to evaluate the impact of the new guidelines on approximately 19 million adults over 20 years of age with more than 120 million blood pressure measurements, who had been seen for a scheduled visit over the last year.

A new infographic by OM1 highlights the findings of this data analysis.

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results Between Medicare’s aggressive migration to value-based payment models and MACRA’s 2017 Quality Payment Program rollout, healthcare providers must accept the inevitability of participation in fee-for-quality reimbursement design—as well as cultivating a grounding in health data analytics to enhance success.

As an early adopter of the Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) and the largest sponsor of MSSP accountable care organizations (ACOs), Collaborative Health Systems (CHS) is uniquely positioned to advise providers on the benefits of data analytics and technology, which CHS views as a major driver in its achievements in the MSSP arena. In performance year 2014, nine of CHS’s 24 MSSP ACOs generated savings and received payments of almost $27 million.

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results examines program goals, platforms, components, development strategies, target populations and health conditions, patient engagement metrics, results and challenges reported by more than 100 healthcare organizations responding to the February 2016 Digital Health survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Guest Post: Value-Based Care is Dying—But Longitudinal Patient Data Can Revive It

November 16th, 2017 by William D. Kirsh, DO, MPH, CMO at Sentry Data Systems

In 2013, Harvard Business Review (HBR) called value-based care “the strategy that will fix healthcare.” And the concept goes back even further than that—Michael Porter and Elizabeth Teisberg introduced the value agenda in their book, Redefining Health Care, in 2006, accord to HBR. Yet years later, value-based care is still struggling to survive, still in limbo, not quite breathing on its own. At this point, you might say it’s in critical condition.

More than a decade after Porter and Teisberg’s book, the industry is still talking about the “transition” to value-based care. In January of this year, CMS and HHS’ Office of the National Coordinator for Health IT (ONC) issued a vision for the continued shift to value-based care. In April, CEOs from Kaiser Permanente, Medtronic, Novartis and others, along with the Netherlands’ health minister, the head of England’s National Health Service, and Harvard economics professor Michael Porter (author of the 2006 book mentioned above) called for a new approach that would embrace patient-centered care and focus on outcomes.

Also in April, the World Economic Forum, in collaboration with The Boston Consulting Group, released a report, Value in Healthcare: Laying the Foundation for Health-System Transformation. Why are we still seeing words like “a new approach” and “laying the foundation” after all the time we’ve had, as an industry, to embrace value-based care?

After much wandering, it’s apparently a destination we still haven’t found on the map.

Resisting Change

According to a report from professional services organization EY (Ernst & Young) in July, about a fourth of 700 respondents (chief medical officers, clinical quality executives and chief financial officers at U.S.-based healthcare providers with annual revenue of $100 million and higher) polled said they had no value-based reimbursement initiatives planned for 2017. And that’s despite figures stating that healthcare spending in the United States “has now risen to 17.8 percent of GDP,” as the EY report says. So, what’s stopping physicians and hospitals from acting on value-based care?

As Modern Healthcare notes, the EY report points to “the escalating cost of care, a lack of standardization in how quality is defined, a disengaged workforce that leads to more medical errors, and a lack of trust and transparency between providers, payers and regulators,“ as some of the barriers. A 2016 article from Deloitte Insights adds that physician compensation may be part of the problem, stating, “Currently, there is little focus on value in physician compensation, and physicians are generally reluctant to bear financial risk for care delivery…86 percent of physicians reported being compensated under fee-for-service (FFS) or salary arrangements.” Deloitte recommends, “At least 20 percent of a physician’s compensation should be tied to performance goals. Current financial incentive levels for physicians are not adequate.”

But financial incentives alone are not enough. “Regardless of financial incentives to reduce costs and improve care quality, physicians would have a difficult time meeting these goals if they lack data-driven tools,” Deloitte says. “These tools can give them insight on cost and quality metrics, and can help them make care decisions that are consistent with effective clinical practice.”

Achieving Quality Outcomes

The EY report seems to come to the same conclusion as Deloitte about the lack of metrics and data. “Clinical outcomes and healthcare quality are often measured inconsistently by healthcare providers — if they are measured at all,” EY says. One way for hospitals to change that—a vital step in the value-based payment model—is through access to and analysis of longitudinal patient data, which is data that tracks the same patients over multiple episodes of care over the course of many years.

The problem is that hospitals and physicians often do not see the outcomes of particular treatment protocols (prescriptions, diagnostic tests, surgeries, etc.) for a long time, and capturing clinical data with this level of accuracy has historically been the industry’s blind spot. Without having a comparison population, each institution can only compare its data to real-world experience within their own data depository. A critical need is to use a de-identified real-world census population to compare protocols, best practices or specific utilization by National Drug Codes to help identify patterns of interventions that create value consistently across multiple systems, physicians, and patients. To truly answer these challenging questions about value in a meaningful way, hospitals need a comparison longitudinal patient data set.

There are countless questions about patient cohorts that physicians might want answered as they seek to make the best treatment decisions: What treatment protocol will result in the highest quality outcomes for a 50-year-old female diabetic patient with kidney failure? Which medications most effectively keep children with asthma from repeat visits to the ER? What comorbidities and symptoms are seen among patients with acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) in their earliest visits to the ER, and how can that information result in earlier diagnosis or different treatment options down the line? Quality historical longitudinal patient data may answer all these questions.

“Market forces are moving the industry toward a new paradigm; one in which delivering the highest value is an organization’s defining goal,” notes the EY report. “Optimizing patient experiences across the continuum of care while industrializing quality requires more than episodic effort.” This is the crux of value-based care. The only way to bring all stakeholders together and keep value-based care alive is by leveraging real-world, longitudinal patient data and using that information to make actionable treatment and prescribing decisions that lead to overall wellness and financial value, instead of focusing on just acute-care treatment.

William D. Kirsh, DO, MPH, CMO at Sentry Data Systems

About the Author: William D. Kirsh, DO, MPH, is chief medical officer at Sentry Data Systems and a practicing physician, clinically certified in family practice, geriatrics, hospice and palliative medicine. Sentry Data Systems, a pioneer in automated pharmacy procurement, utilization management and 340B compliance, is leading the healthcare industry in turning real-time data into real-world evidence through Comparative Rapid Cycle Analytics™ to reduce total cost of care, improve quality, and provide better results for all.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Healthcare Hotwire: Blockchain Technology and AI in Healthcare

November 9th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Blockchain technology and artificial intelligence are healthcare game-changers.

Blockchain technology is a game-changer with the potential to impact not one or two industries, but the complete landscape of how business is done. When 200 healthcare executives were recently surveyed by IBM, 16 percent expect to have a commercial blockchain solution at scale sometime this year.

And artificial intelligence (AI) and robots that support, diagnose and treat people are already in homes, workplaces and clinical environments all over the world, according to PWC.

Still in their infancy, early adopters of these technologies are starting to report promising results.

In the new edition of Healthcare Hotwire, you’ll learn more about the patient benefits of blockchain technology, how AI is being used to identify high-risk colon cancer patients and improve medication adherence and other healthcare blockchain and AI trends.

HIN’s newly launched Healthcare Hotwire tracks trending topics in the industry for strategic planning. Subscribe today.