Archive for the ‘Care Management’ Category

Infographic: Chronic Migraine Patients

March 1st, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Chronic migraine patients have impaired socioeconomic status, reduced quality of life and reduced workplace productivity, according to a new study released by the Headache & Migraine Policy Forum. Moreover, chronic migraine patients commonly have other comorbid conditions that complicate their medical treatment.

The Headache & Migraine Policy Forum has released a new infographic based on the study's findings. The infographic examines the prevalence of chronic migraine patients, healthcare spending on migraine patients and the leading comorbidities associated with migraine patients.

EHR and Clinical Documentation Effectiveness

Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk PopulationsWhen AMITA Health set out to devise a more efficient method of moving its highest-risk Medicare beneficiaries across its care continuum, the newly minted Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) accountable care organization (ACO) abandoned its siloed approach in favor of an enterprise-wide human-centric model of care.

Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk Populations describes how the nine-hospital system inventoried, reexamined and revamped its care management resources, ultimately implementing a centralized care management model that would support the Institute for Healthcare Improvement's Triple Aim goals.

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Infographic: Evidence-based Guidelines for Managing Low-Back Pain

February 15th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Evidence-based Guidelines for Managing Low-Back Pain

The complexity and intensity of treatment for lower back pain may vary depending on how likely it is that the patient will have a good, functional outcome, according to a new infographic by BMJ Publishing Group.

The infographic provide care pathways for patients by expected outcome.

When success in a fee-for-value reimbursement framework calls for a care coordination vision focused on the highest-risk, highest-cost patients, an organization must be able to identify this critical population.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Stratifying High-Risk Patients captures the latest tools and practices employed by healthcare organizations across the care continuum as they risk-stratify patients and health plan members in preparation for care management.

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3 Priority Populations for Home Visits and 10 More House Calls Benchmarks

February 14th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

More than half of home visits include screening for social determinants of health.

More than half of home visits include screening for social determinants of health.

Which patients should healthcare providers visit at home? A new survey on home visits identified three key populations that should receive home-based care management: the frail elderly and homebound (69 percent); the medically complex (69 percent); and individuals recently discharged from the hospital (68 percent).

In stratifying patients for these home visits, 62 percent rely on care manager referrals.

These were just two findings from the 2017 Home Visits survey conducted by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Nearly three quarters of the survey's 107 respondents visit targeted patients at home, an intervention that can illuminate health-related, socioeconomic or safety determinants that might go undetected during an office visit.

Who's conducting these home visits? In more than half of responding programs, a registered nurse handles the visit, although on rare occasions, patients may open their door to a primary care physician (4 percent), pharmacist (4 percent) or community paramedic (3 percent).

Once inside the home, the visit is first and foremost about patient and caregiver education, say 81 percent of respondents, with an emphasis on medication reconciliation (80 percent). Fifty-nine percent also screen at-home patients for social and economic determinants of health, factors that can have a huge impact on an individual's health status.

Patient engagement, including obtaining consent for home visits, tied with funding and reimbursement issues tied as the top challenges associated with in-home patient visits.

How to know if home visits are working? The most telling success indicator is a reduction in 30-day hospital readmission rates, say 83 percent of survey respondents, followed by a drop in hospital and ER utilization (64 percent). Seventy percent of survey respondents reported either a drop in readmissions or in ER visits.

Here are a few more metrics derived from HIN's 2017 Home Visits survey:

  • Eighty-five percent of respondents believe that the use of in-home technology enhances home visit outcomes.
  • Fifteen percent report home visits ROI of between 2:1 and 3:1.
  • Eighty percent have seen clients’ self-management skills improve as a result of home visits.

Download an executive summary of results from HIN's 2017 Home Visits Survey.

AMITA Health Places Patient at Center of Care Management Redesign

February 2nd, 2017 by Patricia Donovan
AMITA Health care management redesign

AMITA Health's care management redesign began in one patient unit on one floor.

In rolling out a new connected care management strategy across its nine-hospital system, AMITA Health aimed to keep its target patient population at the heart of the initiative—unit by unit, floor by floor. Here, Susan Wickey, vice president, quality and care management at AMITA Health, shares one of the guiding principles of the Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organization (MSSP ACO).

The key component for us in our redesign was making sure that the patient was at the center of everything we did. With that in mind, we developed structured processes and programs that would span the care continuum while retaining the patient at the center. We wanted to establish relationship-based care with the patient and the primary care physician. We wanted to be able to use available data to help drive our decisions. We wanted to ensure that our patients had regular access to care, and that we leveraged what we currently had in place.

Our congestive heart failure clinic was key in this process. Navigating through the care continuum is not an easy process for many of our patients. We wanted to make sure we could help them through that, and construct some processes for them to be able to navigate. We wanted to make sure we were continuing to build the health literacy of our patients and our families. We wanted to establish interventions for the most vulnerable population of patients. We wanted to make sure we had a dedicated, multidisciplinary team to help us. We had psychiatrists, dieticians, pharmacists, primary care physicians and physician champions along the way to help us.

We began implementation very slowly, starting with a specific cohort of patients on one specific unit. This cohort was small; the number of people touching the cohort at the time was small. As we went along, we were able to define problem areas where we needed to intervene, quickly readjust and then go down the right path.

Slowly, over a period of time, we were able to add additional floors in our acute care hospitals, which then meant adding additional staff. Those additional staff then became the super users who helped us roll out the program on the next floor.

Source: Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk Populations

Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk Populations

Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk Populations describes how the nine-hospital system inventoried, reexamined and revamped its care management resources, ultimately implementing a centralized care management model.

Social Determinants of Health: Does Technology Connect or Isolate?

January 12th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan
social isolation

Only half of Americans with two or more chronic conditions actually go online.

Social determinants are areas of health that involve an individual’s social and environmental condition as well as experiences that directly impact health and health status. Here, Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer, Pharos Innovations, examines why, contrary to popular thought, technology advances may actually increase the gap between social connectedness and social isolation for certain populations.

In the age of the Internet, technology itself may become a barrier to being connected with others through social interactions. The Pew Research Center has done some nice work on health and the Internet. It turns out that three quarters of adults in the United States go online. That's probably not all that surprising, but what's more nuanced in this data is that the Internet access of individuals in the United States actually differs, depending on whether or not those individuals suffer from chronic health conditions.

It turns out that of Americans who have two or more chronic conditions, which by the way represents the vast majority of the Medicare population, only half go online. As it turns out, the very same groups that suffer most from social determinants of health, and not just from social isolation, also have the highest rates of chronic disease. And according to this research, they are the ones most likely to NOT have access to the Internet. This is called the Internet Divide.

We might be encouraged by the prevalence and penetration of mobile technologies, and maybe those would be the great bridge over the Internet Divide. Unfortunately, that may not be the case yet. According to this same Pew research, 90 percent of Americans who don't have a chronic condition actually own a cellphone. However, if you do have two or more chronic conditions, that number drops down pretty dramatically to 70 percent. That finding is a bit better than Internet access, but certainly not ubiquitous. If you look at those who have a cellphone, only 23 percent of them actually access text-messaging technologies on their cellphones, and smartphone apps fall well below that.

Source: Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services

social determinants of health

In Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services, care teams will learn that by asking patients the right questions and listening carefully to their responses, they can begin to identify and address social determinants, dramatically impacting patient outcomes as well as their own financial success under value-based care.

Infographic: A Digital Prescription for Medication Adherence

December 26th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

A Digital Prescription for Medication AdherenceMedication adherence is a $337 billion problem in the U.S. healthcare industry. Patients failing to take their prescriptions or follow treatment plans result in more than $100 billion every year in hospitalizations alone, and healthcare spending on noncompliant patients is nearly double the cost of abiding patients, according to a new infographic by epam.

The infographic examines how telehealth can be used to improve medication adherence.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Medication ManagementMedication management is the standard of care that ensures each patient’s medications (whether prescription, nonprescription, alternative, etc.) are individually assessed for appropriateness, effectiveness, safety given the individual's comorbidities, other medications and ability to be taken as intended, according to a 2012 Patient-Centered Primary Care Collaborative definition. And while medications represent only a fraction of overall medical cost, they wield considerable influence over patients' chronic condition outcomes, utilization, cost and care experiences.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Medication Management compiles actionable data on the infrastructure, challenges and outcomes of medication management initiatives, based on responses from 101 healthcare organizations to the August 2016 Medication Management survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network. Click here for more information.

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Infographic: 2017 Chronic Care Management Update

December 21st, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services has updated the Chronic Care Management (CCM) rules for 2017 to improve adoption of CCM services by reducing the administrative burden on providers, according to a new infographic by CCM Navigator.

The infographic highlights these changes to CCM and new 2017 CCM codes.

2017 Chronic Care Management Update

A 2015 adopter of Medicare's Chronic Care Management (CCM) reimbursement program, The Center for Primary Care (CPC) quickly expanded its CCM initiative to qualifying Medicare beneficiaries at its nine locations. Today, with a detailed profile of its CCM population and the health improvements and revenue that resulted, the CPC is leveraging this Chronic Care Management experience for participation in MACRA.

Physician Chronic Care Management Reimbursement: Roadmap to MIPS Success Under MACRA describes how early adoption of Medicare's CCM Reimbursement program enhanced the Center's MACRA-readiness, laying the foundation for success under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) path.

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Providers and ACO Data Analytics: Too Much Information Is Not Helpful

November 22nd, 2016 by Patricia Donovan
Add a different caption here.

Collaborative Health Systems believes the health data it distributes to its physicians should speak to the challenges providers see in the market.

As the largest sponsor of Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) accountable care organizations (ACOs), Collaborative Health Systems (CHS) has learned a number of lessons about the integration of data analytics and technology. Here, Elena Tkachev, CHS director of ACO analytics, outlines three challenges her organization has faced in the rollout of health analytics to its provider base, and some CHS approaches to these hurdles.

What are some of the challenges we have identified, and some solutions? Number one is the availability and access to timely and accurate data. This has been a challenge for us. As an insurance company, we have a very strong expertise and access to the claims information Medicare provides to us, but we did face the challenge of incorporating electronic medical records (EMRs) into our data. We have been taking a phased approach, where we continue only adding and enhancing our data. If you are not at a point where you’re ready to consume everything, it doesn’t mean you should not do it until you have all the pieces together. It’s better to start with something and then you can grow from that point and improve it.

The second is related to the technology and capability—the ability to aggregate all this different data from different resources and have it be meaningful. For us, it’s really an investment in having strong technology data architect subject matter experts as well as the tools that can help us with that.

The third is display of meaningful results. This has been a challenge and we’ve reiterated it. Since I first started at CHS, the reports have drastically changed, because we learned from our providers that too much information is not helpful; just giving someone a spreadsheet with a lot of columns is not very useful.

Providers would rather see information summarized, and less is more. It’s really important to have information be very clear. The data needs to speak to the challenges the providers see in the market.

Source: Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Health-Analytics-in-Accountable-Care-Leveraging-Data-to-Transform-ACO-Performance-and-Results-_p_5185.html

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results documents the accomplishments of CHS's 24 ACOs under the MSSP program, the crucial role of data analytics in CHS operations, and the many lessons learned as an early trailblazer in value-based care delivery.

MACRAeconomics: Chronic Care Management Is the Future of Medicare Reimbursement

November 3rd, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

The newly finalized 2017 Physician Fee Schedule expands Chronic Care Management codes to complex patients with multiple chronic illnesses.

Managing a Medicare population, particularly when the majority has two or more chronic illnesses, can be daunting. But in the current realm of healthcare reimbursement, the care of these beneficiaries is rife with opportunity.

"Depending on the manner in which you're managing your Medicare Part B demographic, you have an opportunity to generate from 100 to 120 percent of the Medicare fee schedule under MACRA," noted Barry Allison, chief information officer, the Center for Primary Care, during Physician Chronic Care Management Reimbursement: Setting MACRA's MIPS Path for 2017.

During this October 2016 webinar now available for replay, Allison described how early adoption of Medicare's Chronic Care Management (CCM) Reimbursement program enhanced the Center's MACRA-readiness under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) path. By identifying the more than three-quarters of its 24,000 active Medicare beneficiaries that met CMS's CCM requirements, the Center had a ready pool of patients on which to overlay CMS's care coordination best practices and begin earning crucial CCM revenue.

"CMS recognizes that care management is a critical component of primary care. It contributes to better health and care for individuals, as well as reduced spending," said Allison, who estimates his 40-provider organization is the largest chronic care management initiative in the Southeast.

Using the value-based modifier data available within CMS's Quality Use and Resource Report (QRUR), The Center for Primary Care further identified its percentage of high-risk Medicare patients for more focused care management.

Accessing and reviewing QRUR reports, available from the CMS Enterprise Identity Management (EIDM) desk, is an essential prerequisite to MACRA participation, advised Allison, who also detailed the type of reports and data available from the QRUR. "Procure that data as soon as possible, because you can learn a lot about what CMS will be looking for in the future, and how the value-based modifier will actually become a part of that MACRA multi-pronged approach."

While his organization's CCM program utilized ENLI software to identify 'hot-spotter' data elements such as unfilled prescriptions or ER visits for specific conditions, physician practices that lack this technology still have many tools at their disposal—even appointment scheduling software—to identify high-risk patients.

"Open up consistent lines of dialogue and engage your providers. Sit down with them and say, 'You know your patients better than anyone else. Tell us who to reach out to.'" With or without CCM software, practices should "document, document, document" the amount of time devoted to CCM, as well as how that time benefited patients.

Long-term planning rather than a reactive view will better position physician practices for success under MACRA's Quality Payment Program, Allison concluded. The Center is already estimating how it will fare under Medicare's newly finalized 2017 Physician Fee Schedule (PFS). Next year's PFS significantly updates CCM, offering new codes for complex chronic care management and for extra care management furnished by a physician or practitioner following the initiating visit for patients with multiple chronic conditions.

"For us, CCM is not really focused on the near term revenue as much as it is about the long term action-reaction we can have in the patient's life, and how our physicians are paid over the next three years."

Click here for an interview with Barry Allison on the MACRA Prerequisite of Procuring QRUR Performance Data to Maximize MIPS Success.

‘Connect the Dots’ Transitional Care Boosts ROI by Including Typically Overlooked Populations

October 11th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

Typically overlooked patient populations do benefit greatly from nurse-directed transitional care management.

Some typically overlooked patient populations do benefit greatly from nurse-directed transitional care management.

Determining early on that transitional care works better for some patients than others, the award-winning Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) transitional care (TC) program is careful to allocate resource-intensive TC interventions to those patients that would benefit most. Here, Carlos Jackson, Ph.D., CCNC director of program evaluation, explains the benefits of including often-overlooked patients in TC initiatives.

Transitional care must be targeted towards patients with multiple, chronic or catastrophic conditions to optimize your return on investment. These patients are the ones that benefit the most. It’s the 'multiple complex' part that is the key; this includes conditions that are typically overlooked in transitional care, such as behavioral health or cancers.

We may pass over and not focus on these patients in typical transitional care programs, but actually, they do benefit greatly from our nurse-directed transitional care management.

For example, with a cancer population, transitional care keeps them out of the hospital longer. The transitional care is not necessarily preventing or curing the cancer, but it’s helping to connect those dots in a way that keeps them from returning to the hospital. Again, we are also talking about complex patients. This is not just anybody with cancer; this is somebody with cancer and multiple other physical ailments as well.

The same is true for people who come in with a psychiatric condition. Again, we’re talking about a very sick population. For every 100 discharges, without transitional care almost 100 of these patients will go back to the hospital within the next 12 months. That’s almost a 100 percent return to the hospital. But with transitional care, only about 80 percent return to the hospital within the coming year.

This translates to an expected savings of nearly $100,000 just in averted hospitalizations per 100 patients managed. We were able to demonstrate that the aversions happened not only with the non-psychiatric hospitalizations, but also on the psychiatric hospitalizations.

Even though nurse care managers often tend to be siloed, by doing this coordinated ‘connecting the dots’ transitional care, they were able to prevent psychiatric hospitalization. That certainly has implications for capitated behavioral health systems. We don’t want to forget about these individuals.

Source: Home Visits for Clinically Complex Patients: Targeting Transitional Care for Maximum Outcomes and ROI

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Home-Visits-for-Clinically-Complex-Patients-Targeting-Transitional-Care-for-Maximum-Outcomes-and-ROI_p_5180.html

Home Visits for Clinically Complex Patients: Targeting Transitional Care for Maximum Outcomes and ROI describes the award-winning Community Care of North Carolina (CCNC) transitional care program, how it discerns and manages a priority population for transitional care, and why home visits have risen to the forefront of activities by CCNC transitional care managers.