Archive for the ‘Accountable Care Organizations’ Category

5-Part Framework for MIPS Success Under MACRA

March 2nd, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

Before picking MACRA pace, physician practices should construct a framework for MIPS success.

Along with picking a MACRA pace, physician practices should construct a framework for MIPS success.

Regardless of the pace a healthcare organization sets for Quality Payment Program participation, there are some key tactics that should form the framework of any MACRA initiative. Here, William Holding, consultant with PDA Inc., outlines the critical elements organizations need to achieve "MACRA-readiness."

  • The first component for success is perhaps the most important, and that's having a culture of provider support. A willingness to explore new options. This component is free, so if you don't have that culture in place today, before going and investing in analytics products, performance improvement or new staffing, you've got to put this culture in place. We have seen organizations do this successfully, and make the journey into accountable care organizations (ACOs) or value-based programs by working on this piece first.
  • Second is strategic planning. Set measurable goals. That's important. Look ahead one year, two years, three years. Set goals that have timelines, and goals that are reasonably achievable.
  • The next piece is strong leadership. If you don't have a quality committee or a Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) committee, consider establishing one, and establishing a position lead in that program. It should be a multidisciplinary effort. Pull physicians, mid-levels, nursing leadership, IT and program management into that program. You should have tailored reporting strategies that align with your planning efforts.

    I've experienced teams that didn't work well. In working with large systems, even with the support of clinical leadership and with the right analytical skills, efforts, I have witnessed efforts that were slower than they should have been until they brought in the right team member. This team member possessed in-depth knowledge of clinical workflows, had clout within the organization, knew personnel across IT, could talk to providers, and was a good communicator. When that person was on the team, the efforts began to move forward much faster. You've got to find the right people to be involved.

  • Next, data analytics is key. This starts with an individual with the right skills. It doesn't mean you have to buy the most expensive solution for this. Sometimes ad hoc solutions work just fine for certain organizations. However, you need the right individual who knows the data, who knows how to respond to requests from leadership, and who can really own it.
  • Lastly, clinical documentation is essential. Doing that well will improve your position in this program.

Source: Physician MACRA-Readiness: Mining QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize MIPS Performance

social determinants of health

Physician MACRA-Readiness: Mining QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize MIPS Performance describes the wealth of data analytics available from the CMS Enterprise Portal—Quality Resource Use Reports (QRURs) and other analyses providing a window into practice performance under the Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS). MIPS is one of two MACRA reimbursement paths and the one where most physician practices are expected to align.

Physician Supplemental QRUR: Episode-Specific Patient-Level Data Tells Story of High Utilizers

February 7th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

QRUR reports provide a mirror into physicians' cost and quality performance under MACRA.

As year one of MACRA unfolds, healthcare providers deterred by security hurdles associated with CMS Enterprise Portal access may want to reconsider. The wealth of aggregate quality and cost performance data available through the portal is well worth the trouble of accessing it, advises William Holding, consultant with PDA, Inc.

Specifically, Quality Resource and Utilization Reports (QRURs) downloadable from the portal are essential tools for physician practices that hope to succeed on MACRA-defined reimbursement paths, Holding said—even practices equipped with robust internal reporting systems.

"This is the same system that accountable care organizations (ACOs) use, and that CMS uses for many other things, so it's a good idea to get past those barriers," he explained during Physician MACRA Preparation: Using QRUR and Other CMS Data to Maximize Your Performance, a February 2017 webinar now available for replay.

Originally designed for CMS's value-based modifier, QRURs are good indicators of future cost performance under MACRA, via either Merit-Based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), where most physician practices are expected to fall initially, or Alternate Payment Models (APMs), he said.

After providing an overview of MIPS and APMs, including five essential prerequisites to MACRA preparation, Holding delved into the quality and cost metrics contained in QRURs, from aggregate data in the main report to detailed tables rich with patient-specific information.

The main QRUR report illustrates where a physician practice falls in relation to other practices on the overall composite for cost and quality. The QRUR's Quality portion shows scores for a series of domains, including effective clinical care and patient experience, which offer a great window into how a practice might perform with different selected measures in MIPS.

Next, QRUR cost performance indicates per capita costs for attributed beneficiaries, which will remain a cost measure in MIPS.

Drilling down, Holding characterized seven associated QRUR downloads—including one table on individual eligible professional performance on the 2015 PQRS Measures—as even more useful than the QRURs themselves.

And finally, he termed the downloadable supplemental QRUR "a very powerful tool" that drills down to the beneficiary level, providing a snapshot of some of the highest cost events occurring among a practice's patients.

"For high utilizers, for specific episodes, you can drill right down to the patient to try and understand the story. What's happening to your patient when they're not in your practice, and what can you do about it?" said Holding.

Having presented the available reports, Holding described four key benefits of using QRUR downloads, including as a priority setting tool, and then detailed the myriad of ways QRURs can be analyzed to improve MIPS performance.

However, Holding stressed, even physician practices with the most sophisticated reporting structures will not thrive under MACRA without the right team or culture of provider support in place. He closed his presentation with a formula for determining investment in performance improvement activities and a five-step plan for MACRA preparation.

Listen to an interview with William Holding on the use of QRURs to determine a physician practice's highest value referral pathways.

AMITA Health Places Patient at Center of Care Management Redesign

February 2nd, 2017 by Patricia Donovan
AMITA Health care management redesign

AMITA Health's care management redesign began in one patient unit on one floor.

In rolling out a new connected care management strategy across its nine-hospital system, AMITA Health aimed to keep its target patient population at the heart of the initiative—unit by unit, floor by floor. Here, Susan Wickey, vice president, quality and care management at AMITA Health, shares one of the guiding principles of the Medicare Shared Savings Program Accountable Care Organization (MSSP ACO).

The key component for us in our redesign was making sure that the patient was at the center of everything we did. With that in mind, we developed structured processes and programs that would span the care continuum while retaining the patient at the center. We wanted to establish relationship-based care with the patient and the primary care physician. We wanted to be able to use available data to help drive our decisions. We wanted to ensure that our patients had regular access to care, and that we leveraged what we currently had in place.

Our congestive heart failure clinic was key in this process. Navigating through the care continuum is not an easy process for many of our patients. We wanted to make sure we could help them through that, and construct some processes for them to be able to navigate. We wanted to make sure we were continuing to build the health literacy of our patients and our families. We wanted to establish interventions for the most vulnerable population of patients. We wanted to make sure we had a dedicated, multidisciplinary team to help us. We had psychiatrists, dieticians, pharmacists, primary care physicians and physician champions along the way to help us.

We began implementation very slowly, starting with a specific cohort of patients on one specific unit. This cohort was small; the number of people touching the cohort at the time was small. As we went along, we were able to define problem areas where we needed to intervene, quickly readjust and then go down the right path.

Slowly, over a period of time, we were able to add additional floors in our acute care hospitals, which then meant adding additional staff. Those additional staff then became the super users who helped us roll out the program on the next floor.

Source: Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk Populations

Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk Populations

Centralized Care Management to Reduce Readmissions and Avoidable ED Visits in High-Risk Populations describes how the nine-hospital system inventoried, reexamined and revamped its care management resources, ultimately implementing a centralized care management model.

Infographic: ACO Trends

January 23rd, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Momentum in value-based care has been building over the last several years, and 2016 was no exception, according to a new infographic by Oliver Wyman.

The infographic maps out the more than 630 ACOs in the United States.

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-LifeWhen acknowledging its position as a top-ranking Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), Memorial Hermann is quick to credit its own physicians—who in 2007 lobbied for a clinically integrated network that formed the foundation of the current Memorial Hermann accountable care organization (ACO). Now, eight years later, collaboration and integration continue to be the engines driving the ACO's cost savings, reduced utilization and healthy patient engagement rates associated with Memorial Hermann ACO's highest-risk population.

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-Life details Memorial Hermann's carefully executed journey to quality and the culmination of the ACO's community-based care management program.

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Infographic: Maternity Episodes of Care

January 16th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Maternity Episodes of CareThe cost of maternity care varies significantly by payer (commercial or Medicaid), by type of birth (vaginal or cesarean section), and by setting (hospital or birth center). Too often, women are not experiencing optimal outcomes in maternity care despite the significant resources spent, according to a new infographic by the Health Care Payment Learning & Action Network.

The infographic examines how an episode of care could be applied to maternity care—from an episode timeline for prenatal through postpartum care; episode parameters; operational considerations; and maternity care design elements.

Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey (BCBSNJ) has awarded $3 million to 51 specialty medical practices as part of a shared savings arrangement through the company's Episodes of Care (EOC) program. The doctors, in five different specialty areas, earned the payments by achieving quality, cost efficiency and patient satisfaction goals in 2014 while treating more than 8,000 Horizon BCBSNJ members. As the largest commercial payor of Episodes of Care in the United States, Horizon BCBSNJ recently reported far lower hospital readmission rates and improved clinical outcomes for members in its EOC practices versus non-EOC practices in 2014.

During Episodes of Care: Improving Clinical Outcomes and Reducing Total Cost of Care Through a Collaborative Payor-Provider Relationship, a March 31, 2016 webinar, available for replay, Lili Brillstein, director of the Horizon EOC program, shares the details behind the health plan's EOC program, from the episodes they have bundled to the goals and results from the program.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today. Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Social Determinants of Health: Does Technology Connect or Isolate?

January 12th, 2017 by Patricia Donovan
social isolation

Only half of Americans with two or more chronic conditions actually go online.

Social determinants are areas of health that involve an individual’s social and environmental condition as well as experiences that directly impact health and health status. Here, Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer, Pharos Innovations, examines why, contrary to popular thought, technology advances may actually increase the gap between social connectedness and social isolation for certain populations.

In the age of the Internet, technology itself may become a barrier to being connected with others through social interactions. The Pew Research Center has done some nice work on health and the Internet. It turns out that three quarters of adults in the United States go online. That's probably not all that surprising, but what's more nuanced in this data is that the Internet access of individuals in the United States actually differs, depending on whether or not those individuals suffer from chronic health conditions.

It turns out that of Americans who have two or more chronic conditions, which by the way represents the vast majority of the Medicare population, only half go online. As it turns out, the very same groups that suffer most from social determinants of health, and not just from social isolation, also have the highest rates of chronic disease. And according to this research, they are the ones most likely to NOT have access to the Internet. This is called the Internet Divide.

We might be encouraged by the prevalence and penetration of mobile technologies, and maybe those would be the great bridge over the Internet Divide. Unfortunately, that may not be the case yet. According to this same Pew research, 90 percent of Americans who don't have a chronic condition actually own a cellphone. However, if you do have two or more chronic conditions, that number drops down pretty dramatically to 70 percent. That finding is a bit better than Internet access, but certainly not ubiquitous. If you look at those who have a cellphone, only 23 percent of them actually access text-messaging technologies on their cellphones, and smartphone apps fall well below that.

Source: Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services

social determinants of health

In Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services, care teams will learn that by asking patients the right questions and listening carefully to their responses, they can begin to identify and address social determinants, dramatically impacting patient outcomes as well as their own financial success under value-based care.

Infographic: Social Determinants of Health

January 9th, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Health IT data platforms and delivery systems are increasingly including social determinants of health into population health management goals, and many public-private initiatives are advancing and fine-tuning ways to gauge impact and improvement, according to a new infographic by Philips Wellcentive.

While addressing social determinants of health is an effective strategy to impact population health, it requires focused collaboration. The infographic details six promising examples of current programs and stakeholders.

Social Determinants of Health

Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical ServicesAlthough nearly three-fourths of health outcomes are determined by social determinants, few clinicians can ably identify those patients facing challenges related to social and environmental conditions or other experiences that directly impact health and health status.

In Social Determinants and Population Health: Redesigning Care Management to Bridge Clinical and Non-Medical Services, care teams will learn that by asking patients the right questions and listening carefully to their responses, they can begin to identify and address social determinants, dramatically impacting patient outcomes as well as their own financial success under value-based care.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today. Have an infographic you'd like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.

Infographic: Patient Attribution Guide for Population-based Payment Models

January 2nd, 2017 by Melanie Matthews

Patient Attribution Guide for Population-based Payment Models

Patient attribution is a foundational component of population-based payment (PBP) models, which are based on a simple concept: providers accepting accountability for managing the full continuum of care for their patients, according to a new infographic by the Health Care Payment Learning and Action Network.

The infographic outlines the key steps in patient attribution.

Chronic Care Management Reimbursement Compliance: Physician Requirements for Value-Based RevenueBeyond providing added revenue, billing via Medicare Chronic Care Management (CCM) CPT codes helps to bridge physician practices to value-based care delivery models like the accountable care organization (ACO) or patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Use of the CCM codes is also an opportunity to launch or enhance a chronic care management program. According to 2015 market data, nearly half of responding healthcare organizations lack a formal chronic care management structure, leaving critical reimbursement dollars on the table.

However, practices poised to bill under CCM codes must contend with vague guidance from CMS in certain areas and conflicting interpretations from outside sources on CCM implementation.

Chronic Care Management Reimbursement Compliance: Physician Requirements for Value-Based Revenue sets the record straight on CCM reimbursement compliance, offering strategies for navigating obstacles and meeting requirements.

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7 Healthcare Movements to Monitor in 2017

January 2nd, 2017 by Patricia Donovan

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Growing population base should be a 2017 priority for healthcare organizations, advises Steven Valentine.

In offering a set of guiding principles for 2017 success, Steven Valentine, vice president, Advisory Consulting Services, Premier Inc., outlines seven key areas healthcare executives should monitor in the coming year.

First, we have seen some commercial plans move to risk adjustment payments. This could be helpful or detrimental. We definitely have seen more time spent as health systems have moved to more risk payments, more two-sided models.

Next, a definition of financial responsibility (DoFR) will be critical: knowing all the various benefits that are offered and perhaps listing them on the left side of a spreadsheet. As you move across the sheet, what remains with a health plan, if anything? What would go with the physician organization? What would go to an inpatient facility acute hospital? To ambulatory providers and post-acute providers? We would advise you to begin to move in 2017 to standardize those DoFRs.

Then, if at all possible, exclude specialty drugs, where we’ve seen tremendous price increases. If you can exclude any new kinds of therapies, and I mention one there that’s been popular and growing in 2016, IVIG, and we expect a pretty good jump in 2017. Some doctors have labeled this the 'feel good infusion.'

Then, determine whether you can do anything on an exclusive basis that would help you capture more population. At the end of the day, strategically, in 2017, you need to grow your population base.

Next is effective use of comanagement agreements and a renewed focus on your risk adjustment factor (RAF) scores: there will be slight adjustments as they go down and you’re going to have to do a better and better job of documenting and trying to push those up.

Then we see patient engagement; we do want to see the patients engaged. The more you use various patient portals, the more helpful it will be.

Finally, we also look at the repatriation of patients, because if you have them under your care, you would be responsible for getting those patients and paying for them.

Source: Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2017: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Home-Visits-for-Clinically-Complex-Patients-Targeting-Transitional-Care-for-Maximum-Outcomes-and-ROI_p_5180.html

Healthcare Trends & Forecasts in 2017: Performance Expectations for the Healthcare Industry, HIN's thirteenth annual business forecast, is designed to support healthcare C-suite planning during this historic transition as leaders prepare for both a new year and new presidential leadership.

2016 Healthcare Headlines: MACRA Monopolizes News Until Election Shake-Up

December 26th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan
top 2016 news stories

The unexpected election of Donald J. Trump to the U.S. presidency threatened some healthcare initiatives from the Obama administration, including the Affordable Care Act.

There was only one thing capable of distracting the healthcare industry in 2016 from MACRA's imminent rollout: the election of Donald J. Trump to the presidency of the United States.

Nevertheless, the majority of the last twelve months was spent on healthcare business as usual—the business of transitioning to value-based models of care delivery and reimbursement.

Here are the headlines that dominated the news feeds of healthcare executives in 2016:

New CMS 'Accountable Health Communities' Model Aims to Improve Patients' Health by Addressing Social Needs

January 2016: In a first-ever CMS Innovation Center pilot project to test improving patients’ health by addressing their social needs, the HHS appropriated $157 million in funding to bridge clinical care with social services.

The new pilot will test whether screening beneficiaries for health-related social needs and associated referrals to and navigation of community-based services will improve quality and affordability in Medicare and Medicaid. Many of these social issues, such as housing instability, hunger, and interpersonal violence, affect individuals’ health, yet they may not be detected or addressed during typical healthcare-related visits.

Medicare Shares 6 Core Principles for 21 New 'Next Generation ACOs'

January 2016: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) made waves when it launched a new accountable care organization (ACO) model called the Next Generation ACO Model (NGACO Model). The twenty-one ACOs participating in the NGACO Model in 2016 have significant experience coordinating care for populations of patients through initiatives, including, but not limited to, the Medicare Shared Savings Program and the Pioneer ACO Model.

Providers Slow to Adopt Population Health, Value-Based Models of Care: Study

February 2016: Most healthcare providers continue to lag in implementing population health management despite broad agreement it will be important for future market success, according to a national study by healthcare strategy consultancy Numerof & Associates. The study synthesized survey responses from more than 300 executives and in-depth interviews with over 100 key decision-makers across U.S. healthcare delivery organizations. It provided the first in-depth, national look at the pace of transition from fee-for-service to models based on fixed payments linked to outcomes.

Horizon BCBSNJ 'Episodes of Care' Program Pays $3 Million in Shared Savings to Specialty Medical Practice

February 2016: Horizon Blue Cross Blue Shield of New Jersey (Horizon BCBSNJ) announced that it paid out approximately $3 million to 51 specialty medical practices as part of shared savings generated through the company’s innovative Episodes of Care (EOC) Program. The doctors, in five different specialty areas, earned the payments by achieving quality, cost efficiency and patient satisfaction goals in 2014 while treating more than 8,000 Horizon BCBSNJ members. The EOC model, also known as bundled payments, is one in which specialists manage the full spectrum of care related to a specific procedure, disease diagnosis or health event—such as a joint replacement or pregnancy.

Bundled Payments Improve Care for Medicare Joint Replacement Patients: NYU Langone Study

March 2016: Implementing bundled payments for total joint replacements resulted in year-over-year improvements in quality of care and patient outcomes while reducing overall costs, according to a new three-year study from NYU Langone Medical Center. The three-year pilot at the medical center reported reductions in patient length-of-stay and readmission rates.

CMS to Test New SNF Payment Model to Curb Readmissions, Foster Multidisciplinary Care

March 2016: The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) today announced it would test whether a new payment model for nursing facilities and practitioners will further reduce avoidable hospitalizations, lower combined Medicare and Medicaid spending, and improve the quality of care received by nursing facility residents. This next phase of the Initiative to Reduce Avoidable Hospitalizations among Nursing Facility Residents seeks to reduce avoidable hospitalizations among beneficiaries eligible for Medicare and/or Medicaid by providing new payments to practitioners for engagement in multidisciplinary care planning activities.

Proposed MACRA Rule Would Streamline Medicare Value-Based Payment Models

May 2016: In issuing a proposal to align and modernize how Medicare payments are tied to the cost and quality of patient care for hundreds of thousands of doctors and other clinicians, the Department of Health & Human Services took the first step in implementing certain provisions of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA).

Are You MACRA-Ready? Physician Groups Prep Members for Medicare Payment Modernization

May 2016: As they digested the HHS's momentous proposal to modernize how Medicare provider payments are tied to the cost and quality of patient care, physician organizations began assembling arsenals of educational tools to de-mystify MACRA. The federal government's first step in implementing certain provisions of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) was detailed in an April 2016 announcement.

CMS Releases MACRA Final Rule; Creates Two Pathways for Clinician Value-Based Payments

October 2016: The Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) finalized a landmark new payment system for Medicare clinicians that will continue the administration’s progress in reforming how the healthcare system pays for care. The Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) Quality Payment Program, which replaces the flawed Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR), will equip clinicians with the tools and flexibility to provide high-quality, patient-centered care.

ACA Afterlife: Unwinding Obamacare Under the Trump Administration

November 2016: If U.S. President-elect Donald J. Trump delivers on his campaign promises, the 'repeal and replacement' of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should be an early priority for the nation's chief executive-in-waiting. That prospect sent shock waves through the healthcare industry, as evidenced by a snapshot of post-election responses to the Healthcare Trends in 2017 survey sponsored by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

Trump Taps Orthopedic Surgeon, Medicaid Architect to Helm U.S. Healthcare Posts, Determine ACA Fate

November 2016: Calling his nominees "the dream team that will transform our healthcare system for the benefit of all Americans," President-elect Donald J. Trump announced his plan to nominate Chairman of the House Budget Committee Congressman Tom Price, M.D. (GA-06) as secretary of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) and Seema Verma as administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS).

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