At MACRA Launch, Think Like a MIPS Top Performer

Monday, January 9th, 2017
This post was written by Patricia Donovan

Change this caption to something else.

A focus on quality activities like influenza vaccines is a good starting point for MIPS performance improvement.

With the opening of the first Quality Payment Program performance period on January 1, 2017, many eligible healthcare providers have picked their MACRA participation pace and begun to collect performance data. In certain cases, Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) top performers and MIPS exceptional performers potentially could fare better than Advanced Alternative Payment Model (APM) practices. Here, Barry Allison, chief information officer, the Center for Primary Care, describes some ways clinicians can aspire toward MIPS top performer or exceptional performer status.

According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), a MIPS top performer must be one standard deviation point above the mean, as far as the total cost of care for the patient as well as for the quality metrics reported to CMS. This illustrates why it is critical to look at your organization’s Quality and Resource Use Report (QRUR) data. From looking at our own QRUR data internally, we want to be in the 90th percentile or higher for things like annual flu shots, influenza vaccines, Pneumovax® vaccinations, or Prevnar® vaccinations in conjunction with the Pneumovax 23.

These are very key points. For most EHRs and registries, if you look at quality, that 60 percent that CMS will review in MACRA’s first year, those are the activities where you should aim to report at the high end. I would recommend anywhere from 88 percent and upwards, but my minimum would be reporting on 90 percent of areas where you can use technology to deploy a short message service (SMS) outreach campaign for influenza vaccines or similar tasks.

You want to make sure that in the areas considered low hanging fruit, that you’re either rendering those services, or if you don’t render those types of services, you direct the patient toward a Medicare provider or provider that does render those services and from whom Medicare receives that information.

Let’s take flu shots, for example. Even though your particular practice may not render that service, you should refer your patients somewhere that does administer the shots. You want to refer that patient somewhere where you know that claim will be filed to Medicare, because through their attribution methodology, you’re still that patient’s primary care provider. You still get credit right now for that quality element, even though you may not have administered the shot.

Source: Physician Chronic Care Management Reimbursement: Roadmap to MIPS Success Under MACRA

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Home-Visits-for-Clinically-Complex-Patients-Targeting-Transitional-Care-for-Maximum-Outcomes-and-ROI_p_5180.html

Physician Chronic Care Management Reimbursement: Roadmap to MIPS Success Under MACRA describes how early adoption of Medicare’s CCM Reimbursement program enhanced the Center’s MACRA-readiness, laying the foundation for success under the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) path.

Tags: , , ,

Related Posts:





Comments are closed.