Archive for 2016

Infographic: IoT in Healthcare Trends

November 25th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Some 6.4 Billion connected things will be in use by the end of 2016, with some 5.5 million new things getting connected every day, according to a new infographic by Gartner. The IoT revolution is spreading and healthcare institutions are embracing the change. The industry is taking advantage of connected devices to improve healthcare outcomes and patient engagements.

The infographic looks at the role IoT plays in the healthcare ecosystem and what the future may look like.

Empowered Digital Patients

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital HealthDigital health, also referred to as ‘connected health,’ leverages technology to help identify, track and manage health problems and challenges faced by patients. Person-centric health management is slowly acknowledging the device-driven lives of patients and health plan members and incorporating these tools into care delivery and management efforts.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital Health examines program goals, platforms, components, development strategies, target populations and health conditions, patient engagement metrics, results and challenges reported by more than 100 healthcare organizations responding to the February 2016 Digital Health survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

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Infographic: Medicare and End-of-Life Care

November 23rd, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Although Medicare spent significantly more on care for people at the end of life who died in 2014 ($34,529 per person) than for other beneficiaries that year ($9,121 per person), the share of total Medicare spending for people at the end of life decreased from 18.6% to 13.5% between 2000 and 2014, according to a new Visualizing Health Policy infographic by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

The infographic also examines Medicare spending for end of life care by age, Medicare spending on hospice and the impact of Medicare reimbursement to discuss end of life care, which began in January 2016.

Medicare and End-of-Life Care

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-LifeWhen acknowledging its position as a top-ranking Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP), Memorial Hermann is quick to credit its own physicians—who in 2007 lobbied for a clinically integrated network that formed the foundation of the current Memorial Hermann accountable care organization (ACO). Now, eight years later, collaboration and integration continue to be the engines driving the ACO’s cost savings, reduced utilization and healthy patient engagement rates associated with Memorial Hermann ACO’s highest-risk population.

Care Coordination in an ACO: Population Health Management from Wellness to End-of-Life details Memorial Hermann’s carefully executed journey to quality and the culmination of the ACO’s community-based care management program.

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Providers and ACO Data Analytics: Too Much Information Is Not Helpful

November 22nd, 2016 by Patricia Donovan
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Collaborative Health Systems believes the health data it distributes to its physicians should speak to the challenges providers see in the market.

As the largest sponsor of Medicare Shared Savings Program (MSSP) accountable care organizations (ACOs), Collaborative Health Systems (CHS) has learned a number of lessons about the integration of data analytics and technology. Here, Elena Tkachev, CHS director of ACO analytics, outlines three challenges her organization has faced in the rollout of health analytics to its provider base, and some CHS approaches to these hurdles.

What are some of the challenges we have identified, and some solutions? Number one is the availability and access to timely and accurate data. This has been a challenge for us. As an insurance company, we have a very strong expertise and access to the claims information Medicare provides to us, but we did face the challenge of incorporating electronic medical records (EMRs) into our data. We have been taking a phased approach, where we continue only adding and enhancing our data. If you are not at a point where you’re ready to consume everything, it doesn’t mean you should not do it until you have all the pieces together. It’s better to start with something and then you can grow from that point and improve it.

The second is related to the technology and capability—the ability to aggregate all this different data from different resources and have it be meaningful. For us, it’s really an investment in having strong technology data architect subject matter experts as well as the tools that can help us with that.

The third is display of meaningful results. This has been a challenge and we’ve reiterated it. Since I first started at CHS, the reports have drastically changed, because we learned from our providers that too much information is not helpful; just giving someone a spreadsheet with a lot of columns is not very useful.

Providers would rather see information summarized, and less is more. It’s really important to have information be very clear. The data needs to speak to the challenges the providers see in the market.

Source: Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results

http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Health-Analytics-in-Accountable-Care-Leveraging-Data-to-Transform-ACO-Performance-and-Results-_p_5185.html

Health Analytics in Accountable Care: Leveraging Data to Transform ACO Performance and Results documents the accomplishments of CHS’s 24 ACOs under the MSSP program, the crucial role of data analytics in CHS operations, and the many lessons learned as an early trailblazer in value-based care delivery.

Infographic: Measuring Total Investments in Health

November 21st, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Current spending on medical care is increasing, but does not always translate to improved health. Research has, however, shown a positive relationship between spending on social services and improved health and there has been a growing number efforts to measure “total spend on health” or the investments being made to produce health, according to a new infographic by Leavitt Partners.

To better understand total spend on health, defined as health expenditures that extend beyond traditional clinical care costs or total cost of care measures to include costs related to social determinants of health, Leavitt conducted, with support from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, an assessment of related research and initiatives.

The infographic examines the key challenges of analyzing total spend on health and next steps for healthcare leaders, researchers and other stakeholders in this area.

Empowered Digital Patients

The move from fee-for-service to value-based healthcare is driving the need for increased capabilities in population health management, including addressing all of the areas that may impact a person’s health. There is growing recognition that a broad range of social, economic and environmental factors shape an individual’s health, according to the New England Journal of Medicine. In fact, 60 percent of premature deaths are due to either individual behaviors or social and environmental factors. Healthcare providers who adopt value-based reimbursement models have an economic interest in all of the factors that impact a person’s health and providers must develop new skills and data gathering capabilities and forge community partnerships to understand and impact these factors.

During Social Determinants and Population Health: Moving Beyond Clinical Data in a Value-Based Healthcare System a December 8th webinar at 1:30 p.m. Eastern time, Dr. Randall Williams, chief executive officer, Pharos Innovations, will share his insight on the opportunity available to providers to impact population health beyond traditional clinical factors.

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Infographic: Empowered Digital Patients

November 18th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Today’s empowered digital patients desire smarter, more connected care, according to a new infographic by CDW Healthcare.

The infographic examines the technology making the rounds across healthcare settings to deliver value to patients and providers.

Empowered Digital Patients

Real-time remote management of high-risk populations curbed hospitalizations, hospital readmissions and ER visits for more than 80 percent of respondents and boosted self-management levels for nearly all remotely monitored patients, according to 2014 market data from the Healthcare Intelligence Network (HIN).

Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels.

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Infographic: MACRA Pathways

November 16th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Under MACRA, 2017 will be the first performance year physicians will be scored to determine payment adjustments in 2019. Physicians will choose between two payment tracks: the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) or the Alternative Payment Model (APM), according to a new infographic by the American Academy of Family Physicians (AAFP).

The infographic highlights the path options physicians can choose.

Infographic: MACRA Pathways

No matter which level of participation physician practices choose for the first Quality Payment Program performance period beginning January 1, 2017, CMS’s “Pick Your Pace” announcement means practices should proactively prepare for the impact of the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (MACRA) on physician quality reporting and reimbursement.

MACRA Physician Quality Reporting: Positioning Your Practice for the MIPS Merit-Based Incentive Payment System delivers a veritable MACRA toolkit for physician practices, with dozens of tips and strategies that lay the groundwork for reimbursement under Medicare’s Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS), expected to begin in 2017 and one of two payment paths Medicare will offer to practices.

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Guest Post: Care Transitions Are Susceptible To Breakdowns; Technology-Enabled Patient Outreach Offers Clarity and Improved Outcomes

November 15th, 2016 by Chuck Hayes, vice president of product management for TeleVox Solutions, West Corporation

Technology-Enabled Patient Touchpoints Post-Discharge

A surprisingly simple way to improve care transitions is to reach out to patients within a few days of hopsital discharge automatically with the help of technology.

Transitional care’s inherently complex nature makes it susceptible to breakdowns. During care transitions there are many moving parts to coordinate, patients are vulnerable, and healthcare failures are more likely to occur. For these reasons, transitional care is a growing area of concern for hospital administrators and other healthcare leaders.

Errors that happen at pivotal points in care, like during a hospital discharge or transfer from one facility to another, can have serious consequences. Fortunately, strengthening communication and engaging patients can effectively solve many of the problems that transpire during care transitions.

When patients’ needs go unmet after being discharged from the hospital, the risk of those individuals being readmitted is high. Around 20 percent of Medicare patients discharged from the hospital return within a month. CMS has taken several steps to try to improve transition care and minimize breakdowns that lead to hospital readmissions. Under the government’s Hospital Readmissions Reduction Plan (HRRP), hospitals can be assigned penalties for unintentional and avoidable readmissions related to conditions like heart attacks, heart failure, pneumonia, COPD, and elective hip or knee replacement surgeries.

Between October 2016 and September 2017, Medicare will withhold more than $500 million in payments from hospitals that incurred penalties based on readmission rates. These penalties affect about half of the hospitals in the United States.

Not only are payment penalties problematic, but because readmissions rates are published on Medicare’s Hospital Compare website, public opinion is also worrisome for hospitals with a high number of readmissions.

A surprisingly simple way to prevent patients from returning to the hospital is to reach out to them within a few days of discharge. Outreach can be done automatically with the help of technology. For example, with little effort, hospitals can send automated messages prompting patients to complete a touchtone survey. A survey that asks patients whether they are experiencing pain–and whether or not they have been taking prescribed medications–provides good insight about the likelihood of them returning to the hospital. It also allows hospitals to respond to issues sooner rather than later.

Medical teams know that patients are particularly vulnerable during the 30 days following a hospital discharge. Leveraging technology-enabled engagement communications multiple times, in multiple ways throughout that month-long window is a good strategy for improving post-discharge transitions. Whether that involves reminding a patient about a follow-up appointment, asking them to submit a reading from a home monitoring device, verifying that they are tolerating their medication, or communicating about something else, it is important to have plans in place to initiate an intervention if necessary.

For example, if a patient indicates that they are experiencing side effects or symptoms that warrant examination by a doctor, a hospital team member should escalate the situation and help coordinate an appointment for the patient. Recognizing problems is one component of improving care transitions, responding to them is another.

Imagine a patient has recently been released from the hospital after having a heart attack. The patient was given three new prescriptions for medications to take. He may have questions about when and how to take the medications or whether they can be taken in combination with a previous prescription. Hospital staff can use technology-enabled communications to coordinate with the patient’s primary care doctor and pharmacy to ensure the patient has all the information they need to safely and correctly follow medication instructions. The hospital can also survey the patient to find out if he is having difficulty with medication or other discharge instructions, and learn what services or interventions might be beneficial. Following that, a care manager can provide phone support to answer questions.

Fewer than half of patients say they’re confident that they understand the instructions of how to care for themselves after discharge. Without some sort of additional support, what will happen to those patients? In the past, hospitals may have felt that patient experiences outside the walls of their facility were not their concern. But that has changed.

Care transitions are exactly that–transitions. They are changes, but not end points. Hospitals should foster a culture that recognizes and supports the idea that care does not end at discharge. It continues, just in a different way. When patients physically leave a hospital, the manner in which care is delivered needs to progress. Rather than delivering care in person, healthcare organizations can support patients via outreach communications. The degree to which that happens impacts how well (or poorly) transitions go for patients.

Improving care transitions is not as daunting as it might seem, particularly for medical teams that use technology-enabled communications to support and engage patients. To ensure patients have the knowledge and resources they need, and that they are acting in ways that will keep them out of the hospital, medical teams must focus on optimizing communications beyond the clinical setting.

About the Author: Chuck Hayes is an advocate for utilizing technology-enabled communications to engage and activate patients beyond the clinical setting. He leads product and solution strategy for West Corporation’s TeleVox Solutions, focusing on working with healthcare organizations of all sizes to better understand how they can leverage technology to solve organizational challenges and goals, improve patient experience, increase engagement and reduce the cost of care. Hayes currently serves as Vice President of Product Management for TeleVox Solutions at West Corporation (www.west.com), where the healthcare mission is to help organizations harness communications to expand the boundaries of where, when, and how healthcare is delivered.

HIN Disclaimer: The opinions, representations and statements made within this guest article are those of the author and not of the Healthcare Intelligence Network as a whole. Any copyright remains with the author and any liability with regard to infringement of intellectual property rights remain with them. The company accepts no liability for any errors, omissions or representations.

Infographic: Overcoming 5 Data Challenges Preventing Effective Physician Alignment

November 14th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Achieving physician alignment, critical to the success of health systems, requires a view into physician activity and referrals, according to a new infographic by Evariant.

Claims data is the best source of information to help analyze and identify referral patterns to move toward achieving physician alignment, but analyzing this information does not come without its own unique set of challenges. The infographic examines five data challenges preventing effective physician alignment and how to overcome them.

Overcoming 5 Data Challenges Preventing Effective Physician Alignment

6 Value-Based Physician Reimbursement Models: Action Plans for Alignment, Analytics and Profitability In today’s value-based healthcare sphere, providers must not only shoulder more responsibility for healthcare outcomes, cost and quality but also align with emerging compensation models rewarding these efforts—models that often seem confusing or contradictory. The challenges for payors and partners in creating a common value-based vision are sizing the reimbursement model to the provider organization and engaging physicians’ skills, knowledge and behaviors to foster program success.

6 Value-Based Physician Reimbursement Models: Action Plans for Alignment, Analytics and Profitability examines a set of provider compensation models across the collaboration continuum, advising adopters on potential pitfalls and suggesting strategies to survive implementation bumps.

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ACA Afterlife: Unwinding Obamacare Under the Trump Administration

November 14th, 2016 by Patricia Donovan

The people have spoken: the future of the ACA is healthcare's most pressing concern for 2017.

The people have spoken: the future of the Affordable Care Act is healthcare’s most consuming concern for 2017.

If U.S. President-elect Donald J. Trump delivers on his campaign promises, the ‘repeal and replacement’ of the Affordable Care Act (ACA) should be an early priority for the nation’s chief executive-in-waiting.

That prospect sent shock waves through the healthcare industry, as evidenced by a snapshot of post-election responses to the ongoing Healthcare Trends in 2017 survey sponsored by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

“The change or replacement of Obamacare might affect us significantly, including changing our USA market priority over other markets,” contributed one respondent.

“We don’t know what ACA repeal implications will mean for us,” offered another.

Other respondents identified “changes to our government structure and the unknown impact” as well as “lack of clarity post-election” as their most pressing concerns for the year ahead.

Take the Healthcare Trends 2017 survey and receive an executive summary of the results.

Given Trump’s ambitious healthcare agenda, much is at stake for industry stakeholders. But is it possible for the incoming administration to unravel the ACA, when the public already has been exposed to many of its provisions? And if repeal is possible, how long might the process take?

Greg Mertz, managing director for Physician Strategies Group, LLC, advises healthcare organizations not to panic about the ACA’s demise. “A ‘“repeal and replace’ means that Trump admits Obamacare can’t go away. Nothing will happen quickly, and whatever happens will be less dramatic than many expect,” predicts Mertz, who points to Trump’s lack of specifics as to what might replace Obamacare as further evidence.

“House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wisconsin, has already put forward his plan for healthcare reform, so I would think his ideas will be a pivotal part of what eventually gets passed,” continues Mertz. “However, Congress still decides what happens, so whatever Trump proposes will be mired in hearings, staff work, and debate for at least the next year. This means that we limp along with a broken program as we argue what is better.”

Also based on Ryan’s healthcare proposals, Travis Ansel, senior manager of strategic services for Healthcare Strategy Group, is advising providers to brace for more Health Savings Account (HSA)-related payment woes. “Ryan’s plans for Medicare, which have loomed over the industry for five years, bring with them increased patient payment obligations,” Ansel explains. “Expect more and more employer-based coverages to shift to HSAs as well. We can expect payors to raise insurance premiums across the board as the Republican-led Congress unwinds the ACA.”

Ansel pointed out that major payors were forced to shift their business models and infrastructure to compete in an ACA-focused market. “The quick shift back will be a reality these payors are not prepared for and not prepared to succeed under,” he concludes.

As payor margins suffer, adds Mertz, pressure will be placed on commercial insurers to raise reimbursement to offset the gap. “Employers will howl and the feds will be pressured to control costs, especially big pharma.”

Where Mertz does expect activity is within the Health Insurance Exchanges created by the ACA. “The insurance exchanges are in trouble already, so we would expect that providers that were seeing significant numbers of exchange-insured individuals would have likely seen a drop in those numbers regardless. I think the number of uninsured will increase in the short-term, as many will decide that paying the penalty is better than paying the premium.”

As to what healthcare might look like under the Trump administration, Mertz thinks the industry will see tax credits or vouchers. “However, I seriously doubt we’ll see a government-sponsored alternative, which I think we would have seen with (the Democratic presidential nominee) former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.”

On the provider side, Mertz expects that while physicians will see little impact, hospitals will see a rise in charity care, and no major increase in income.

For a post-election roadmap to the challenges and opportunities facing healthcare in the year ahead under GOP leadership, don’t miss Trends Shaping the Healthcare Industry in 2017: A Strategic Planning Session, a live webcast on Thursday, November 17 at 1:30 Eastern.

Take the Healthcare Trends 2017 survey and receive an executive summary of the results.

Infographic: Hidden Encrypted Threats Impact Healthcare

November 11th, 2016 by Melanie Matthews

Healthcare organizations are increasingly targeted by cyber criminals seeking to steal electronic protected health information, electronic health records, personally identifiable information and other confidential patient data, according to a new infographic by A10.

The infographic examines the healthcare cyber threat, the need for SSL, why healthcare organizations have been slow to adopt SSL and the top SSL decryption tools.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital HealthPerson-centric health management is slowly acknowledging the device-driven lives of patients and health plan members and incorporating these tools into care delivery and management efforts.

2016 Healthcare Benchmarks: Digital Health examines program goals, platforms, components, development strategies, target populations and health conditions, patient engagement metrics, results and challenges reported by healthcare organizations responding to the February 2016 Digital Health survey by the Healthcare Intelligence Network.

Get the latest healthcare infographics delivered to your e-inbox with Eye on Infographics, a bi-weekly, e-newsletter digest of visual healthcare data. Click here to sign up today.

Have an infographic you’d like featured on our site? Click here for submission guidelines.