Countering 5 Remote Monitoring Cautions in Face of mHealth Uncertainty

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015
This post was written by Cheryl Miller

remote_patient_monitoring

Physician champions and legislative advocates can spur remote patient monitoring success.

Physician skepticism about mHealth is a frequently cited barrier to implementing remote monitoring. But once physicians understand they can allot in-person visits for those who truly need them, then use their other time remotely monitoring other patients to wellness, they might be more willing to buy in to mHealth.

It’s all about educating the physician, advises Dr. Luke Webster, vice president, chief medical information officer, CHRISTUS Health, who shared how CHRISTUS responded to these challenges during its remote patient monitoring pilot.

  • Unclear ROI: There are always questions around ROI. We look at pre-implementation costs and pre-enrollment costs versus post-costs, including all project costs. What does that ROI mean for your organization?
  • Limited Resources: With care transitions, we took remote patient monitoring and put it on top of the care transitions program. That added additional responsibilities to the already busy workflow process. Whether you’re looking at an E-Hub model or expanding these programs into other areas of your organization, it’s important to review that budget up front. What’s expected of your outcome goals? How will you do that from a day-to-day process and biweekly performance outcomes and measures so you meet that targeted overall outcome, whether it’s reducing length of stay, cost of care, or 30-day readmissions?

    You want all of that to match. Your resources have to be identified upfront. We have been very fortunate to have our providers as champions. They buy into it; they understand it. They didn’t buy into it initially because the nurse coach thought it necessary to make that patient home visit. Sometimes it is. But she has found, with these tools, that she can better do that from her office and manage more patients.

  • Physician Skepticism: It is important to understand your champions, your available resources, backup, etc., when issues come up and you need those resources. We’re finding — and statistics state this — that physicians are still more comfortable doing face-to-face visits. Keeping those patients healthier and at home means we’re keeping them out of the facilities. The physicians and primary care providers may have some skepticism regarding that as well. They have less hands-on training with the equipment so perhaps don’t fully understand the opportunity for them to fill clinic days with patients that are truly in need of an appointment that day versus monitoring others who can be coached to wellness at home.

    It’s about educating physicians, finding those champions and engaging them in the overall process and direction of our health system.

  • Reimbursement Regulations: You need an advocate who can speak for you, represent what you’re doing, and prove the value both at a state and federal level. That should be an ongoing process and on your calendar monthly: identifying and calling your state or federal representative.
  • Rising Technology Costs: This is a booming area; vendors can’t get their products out fast enough. When you set up a budget for a program like this and look to initiate a pilot or expansion, you must look at all technology costs—not only for hardware but for software, upgrades and required support. Do you go through a third party vendor, and do you lease or purchase your equipment? When do you purchase the equipment? Just from our original pilot in late 2012 to today, we’ve seen some changes in technology. If your kits are organized to fit that original technology, how will that change 18 months later, and what will be the cost of adjusting the kits (for example, Styrofoam, boxes, etc.)?

    All of that will change. Look at those technology costs and related issues as you move forward and have a plan to how best recycle that kit.

    Remote Monitoring
    Luke Webster, MD, is vice president and chief medical information officer of CHRISTUS Health. Dr. Webster has over 20 years of clinical and health informatics experience. He specializes in health informatics and physician leadership, clinician adoption and change leadership, clinical transformation, evidence-based medicine, clinical analytics and process improvement.

    Source: Remote Patient Monitoring for Chronic Condition Management

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