Overcoming ‘Clinical Inertia’ and 7 Other Barriers to Remote Patient Monitoring

Thursday, February 26th, 2015
This post was written by Cheryl Miller

It’s important to identify potential barriers from both patients and providers before implementing a telehealth program, says Susan Lehrer, RN, CDE, associate executive director of the telehealth office for the New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation (NYCHHC), because both groups need to change behaviors. Resistance to change is universal, and if you’re changing any kind of work flow or communication, there will be initial resistance.

  • Slow buy-in and some resistance by clinicians (referrals).
  • Clinicians concerned with appearance of decreased productivity.
  • Resistance to change in clinic work flow.
  • Inability to “integrate” Web site data and electronic medical records (EMRs).
  • Language and literacy.
  • Complexity of chronic disease management.
  • Lack of protocols for use of email in coordination of care.
  • Not all clinicians utilize secure email system.
  • Source: Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management

    http://hin.3dcartstores.com/Remote-Monitoring-of-High-Risk-Patients-Telehealth-Protocols-for-Chronic-Care-Management_p_5008.html

    Remote Monitoring of High-Risk Patients: Telehealth Protocols for Chronic Care Management profiles a successful eight-year initiative by New York City Health and Hospitals Corporation’s (NYCHHC) House Calls Telehealth Program that significantly lowered patients’ A1C blood glucose levels. Susan Lehrer, RN, BSN, CDE, associate executive director of the telehealth office for NYCHHC, shares key aspects of the real-time monitoring program, including how the program blends telehealth, electronic medical records, electronic communication with providers and direct communication with patients by nurse case managers, and much more.

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