Motivational Interviewing by Ochsner Health Coaches Drives Results in 4 Key Areas

When health coaches employ motivational interviewing during patient encounters, expect upticks in medication adherence, weight loss, HbA1c levels and overall engagement, notes Alicia Vail, RN health coach for Ochsner Health System. Ochsner’s eight health coaches focus on patients with diabetes, hypertension and obesity who have come to their attention by way of physician referrals, health screenings and pre-chart reviews.

In this podcast, Ms. Vail describes how Ochsner Health System incorporates health coaches in its clinic structure and describes the benefits that result from the coaching intervention.

Alicia Vail and Bill Appelgate, executive director of the Iowa Chronic Care Consortium, shared how an evidence-based health coaching focus drives returns in a value-based payment delivery system during a June 19, 2013 webinar, Health Coaching’s Value in Accountable Care and Medical Homes.


Length: 3:59 minutes

Health Coaching’s Value in Accountable Care and Medical Homes

Primary care and the patient-centered medical home offer a great opportunity for health coaches to become allies with patients in improvement of their health, notes William Appelgate, executive director of the Iowa Chronic Care Consortium. Individuals with the highest health risks should be given priority, but those on the cusp of a serious health event also merit coaching assistance, he says. For providers new to the coaching conversation, Appelgate shares three benefits of incorporating health coaches in the care process — including the upping of their ‘outcomes game.’

Bill Appelgate and Alicia Vail, RN health coach for Ochsner Health System, shared how an evidence-based health coaching focus drives returns in a value-based payment delivery system during a June 19, 2013 webinar, Health Coaching’s Value in Accountable Care and Medical Homes.


Length: 8:35 minutes

Integrated Health Coaching: The Next Generation in Health Behavior Change Management

Integrated health coaching’s person-centric approach to health behaviors across the entire health risk continuum aligns with many of the key principles of post-ACA care delivery models like the patient-centered medical home and the accountable care organization (ACO), explains Dr. Dennis Richling, HealthFitness chief medical and wellness officer. Dr. Richling and HealthFitness Vice President of Service Delivery, Kelly Merriman describe the population presenting the greatest opportunities for integrated health coaching, the key to discerning participant values during the coaching intervention, and the art of ‘appreciative inquiry’ — an essential coaching skill that helps to define an individual’s ‘exceptionality.’

Dr. Richling and Kelly Merriman presented during Integrated Health Coaching: The Next Generation in Health Behavior Change Management, a 45-minute webinar on September 20, 2012, now available for replay, during which they shared the key features of HealthFitness’ integrated health coaching program, from how participants are assessed and assigned to coaches to the program’s impact.


Length: 8:36 minutes

Health Coaching Trends for 2012

While telephonic sessions were the primary vehicle for health coaching in the last five years, Internet-based face-to-face coaching incorporating motivational interviewing techniques is one of the directions the industry will be taking going forward, says Melinda Huffman, partner in Miller and Huffman Outcome Architects, co-founder of the National Society of Health Coaches, and a cardiovascular clinical specialist, writer and author. Mobile applications will also become more widely used, enabling health professionals to quickly access their patients’ personal records, and coach via internet-based in-person calls.

There will also be a move toward standardizing health coaching in terms of definition, education, and training and skill validation, Huffman says.


Length: 6:23 minutes

Evaluating Health and Wellness Incentive Programs for Behavior Change


Getting people to think about dying is not the first health behavior that comes to mind when employing incentives. However, incentives can be used anywhere in the healthcare continuum — including end of life — to influence behaviors, notes Neal Sofian, MSPH, director of member engagement at Premera Blue Cross. Sofian describes the barriers individuals face at this time in their lives and how the use of incentives can result in exactly the kind of care these patients want and need.

Sofian shared the latest strategies to increase engagement and the results from these efforts during Evaluating Health and Wellness Incentive Programs for Behavior Change, a 45-minute webinar on February 10, 2011.




Length: 3:19 minutes

Health Coaching Evaluation: Measuring the ROI on Healthcare Utilization and Costs

The dismal economy of 2009 has been a bright spot for health coaching and other health improvement programs, notes Dr. Jim Reynolds, chief medical officer for Health Fitness Corporation. Dr. Reynolds also compares early results from a Massachusetts’ smoking cessation program for Medicaid beneficiaries with outcomes in commercial populations, and describes what Year 1 of a coaching program for improved medication adherence might yield in the way of behavior change and cost impacts.

Dr. Reynolds and Dr. Elizabeth Rula, clinical research manager at the Center for Health Research at Healthways Inc., shared how their organizations respond to the challenges of evaluating and reporting on health coaching ROI during the January 13, 2010 webinar, Health Coaching Evaluation: Measuring the ROI on Healthcare Utilization and Costs.


Length: 4:13 minutes

Finding Success in Health Behavior Change


A move backward in readiness to change should not be perceived as a failure on the client’s part but rather as an opportunity to readjust behavior goals, observes Kate Larsen, president of Winning LifeStyles, Inc., an ICF-certified professional coach and a WellCoaches® faculty member and mentor coach. There’s value in reminding clients that health coaching is a journey and in checking coaching egos at the door to improve listening skills and allow clients to own their behavior change goals, notes the author of “Progress, Not Perfection.”

Larsen and Claudine Reilly, wellness manager at CVS Caremark, a Certified Intrinsic Coach, and a Certified Health Education Specialist, provided different scenarios that coaches might encounter with patients and examples of how coaches can and should respond to assist clients in achieving the health behavior change they need during the July 15, 2009 webinar, Finding Success in Health Behavior Change.


Length: 9:39 minutes

Calculating the Health Coaching ROI: Models and Results

According to Paul Terry, Ph.D., president and CEO of StayWell Health Management, when evaluating health coaching and population health programs, it is rare to see a return on investment in a program’s first year, but generally by the second and third years, ROI begins to build. In addition to discussing ROI trends, Terry evaluates the value of self-reported data and the impact health coaching can have on an organization’s productivity, presenteeism and absenteeism, and also gives some benchmarks for ROI in health coaching.

Terry, along with Dr. Craig Nelson, director of health services research for American Specialty Health, described the measures to look at when evaluating health coaching and population health programs and provided case studies of how they are actually using these measures to demonstrate a health management ROI during a March 25, 2009 webinar, Calculating the Health Coaching ROI: Models and Results.


Length: 7:12 minutes