Behavioral Health Patient Engagement: Change Talk Highly Predictive of Behavior Change

Mia CroyleIncreasingly in motivational interviewing (MI) research, change talk—anything a patient or client says that counts as an argument for change—is a reliable sign they’re ready to make a change, notes Mia Croyle with the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health.

Here, Ms. Croyle shares some of the latest thinking regarding change talk: how motivational interviewing practitioners might interpret change talk in interactions with clients, particularly those with behavioral health diagnoses, as well as how to elicit more change talk during an MI session.

During a June 2016 webinar, Behavioral Health Patient Engagement: Using Motivational Interviewing Techniques and Strategies To Improve Outcomes, now available for replay, Ms. Croyle shares key learnings from patient engagement initiatives targeted at patients with behavioral health conditions.


Length: 3:40 minutes

HCSC’s Community Behavioral Health Links Essential to Duals Care Coordination

Relationships with community organizations that support mental health as well as recovery from addiction are essential to care coordination of Medicare-Medicaid beneficiaries, notes Julie Faulhaber, vice president of enterprise Medicaid at Health Care Service Corporation (HCSC). These collaborations enable HCSC to address the needs of duals as “a whole sick person, and not just as a diagnosis,” she explains, noting that duals often suffer from depression along with some physical disability. HCSC also has its own integrated team with behavioral health expertise.

Julie Faulhaber shared her organization’s approach to designing a care coordination model for dual eligibles and initial findings from these new programs during a March 12, 2014 webinar Moving Beyond the Medical Care Coordination Model for Dual Eligibles, a 45-minute program sponsored by The Healthcare Intelligence Network.


Length: 4:06 minutes